Perfume Directory

Ysatis (1984)
by Givenchy


Ysatis information

Year of Launch1984
AvailabilityIn Production
Average Rating
(based on 233 votes)

People and companies

PerfumerDominique Ropion
PackagingPierre Dinand
Parent CompanyLVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton
Parent Company at launchLa Veuve Clicquot

About Ysatis

Ysatis is a feminine perfume by Givenchy. The scent was launched in 1984 and the fragrance was created by perfumer Dominique Ropion. The bottle was designed by Pierre Dinand

Reviews of Ysatis


She was my main supporter in writting.and she was the first one who read my reviews.
An unique queen with a wonderful collection.
Whereas most of my feminine reviews was about the vintage fragrances derived from her awesome collection.
I remember well the last time she hugged me,I smelled this of her favorite perfume.
She always eager to read my review about it but...
Now I am going to present this special review to her big soul,that I wrote it today in my three special style.She is a heroine.Yes she is my grandmother.

1.The snow-blind white of the jasmine and tuberose blossoms sparkle with beguiling sweetness,with narcotic opulence;the atmosphere instantly becomes dreamy upon inhaling their emanations.but the beautiful can be rendered dangerous if you smell too much too much of either.
GIVENCHY stops just short of the haunting dark intensions engulfing you with the design,adding a garland of tempting elements with a soapy vibe(orange blossom,rose and jasmine)and some spice(cloves,ylang ylang)for nice balance.
The insinuating base,though,full of animalistic civet,recalls vintage perfume of yore,when women were real women and had men for breakfast.just like HER!

2.She wearing deep red lipstick,her cheeks bring a hint of blush to her porcelain skin,she wears high heel tightly fitted boots,with fir coats and fat diamond rings,..she walks through the hallway in the empire state building with confidence.she glids her fingers down her hair every now and then and grabbs everyone attention with her style and her scent.her scent is timeless,classy,classic,memorable,queenly,rich and floral which makes it clear that the wearer is a real heroine just like HER!

3.I am a real vintage lover just like experience that do not put this kind of perfumes on clothes as they are not a linear smell that stays the same whenever you put it.this scents really a multifaceted gem that needs body feminine warmth.
Fracas,N5 and Miss dior I am not saying this is similar to them just that it evokes the same feeling:power and being in control.if you like any if those you would adore this one just like HER!

12th January, 2016
This perfume is really great if you are looking for something that gives an impression of freshly cut grass or green leaves. I was actually looking for something like this a while back, and didn't even realize that's exactly what this scent is!
It's great for both men and women, and can be worn pretty much any time and anywhere because it isn't a very strong or overwhelming scent. The main reason I'm only giving it three stars is because I find it fades out kind of fast and doesn't have great longevity, so you may have to re apply this one throughout the day. I'm not really a big fan of having to do that. Aside from that, this is a really great Classic Chypre that you should definitely think of trying, especially if you're a fan of Chypres and green and woody scents in general.
23rd October, 2015
A superb tropical floral.

Coconut, Tuberose, Honey, Rose, Jasmine, Amber - what could be wrong?

This manages to be both brilliantly floral and at the same time warm, as if it has already received the skin/blood warmth of the wearer on a cool tropical evening. The warmth is imbued from the castoreum, civet and cistus.

I am a great admirer of tropical scents, when they are balanced and not over-bearing in their heaviness. This is perfection of that type of floral.

Barbara Herman nails it down - "Sensal floral, nutty, milky, tropical."

Turin misses it entirely - "Lemon custard - woody floral - 3 stars." Three strikes, he's out!

I'm adding this to my must always have with me list of great scents.

Top notes: Rosewood, Coconut
Heart notes: Tuberose, Jasmine, Narcissus, Carnation, Rose, Ylang
Base notes: Patchouli, Sandalwood, Castoreum, Civet, Oakmoss, Amber, Honey, Cistus

Due to so many notes now being forbidden, seek out only Vintage bottles.

A masterpiece.
27th July, 2014 (last edited: 26th May, 2015)
Genre: Floral Oriental

Ysatis is a hefty floral oriental fragrance built around a lush, sweetened tuberose note that dominates from the moment the liquid exits the bottle. It’s composed in the same general style as Boucheron, Giorgio, and Poison, though on less monumental scale. This relative (but only relative,) modesty makes Ysatis a lot easier to wear than some of its 1980s congeners, though I’d never call it subtle. Think large SUV vs. Panzer tank.

Luca Turin and Tanya Sanchez compare Ysatis with Byzance, and while I perceive similarities, Ysatis is a heavier scent, and I think it smells positively stately next to the Rochas. An emphasis on white flowers and abundant soapy aldehydes may also account for the greater sense of occasion I feel when wearing Ysatis. I can see Byzance worn informally or at the office (as my wife frequently does), but Ysatis? Not so much. The aldehydes and the more conspicuous tuberose also leave Ysatis smelling more specifically “feminine” - at least within the Western cultural framework of gender associations and scent.

The vanilla-seasoned drydown depends less on amber than on soapy floral notes and woods, further emphasizing the relatively starched, formal aspect of the scent while moderating the tuberose’s lascivious tendencies. Ysatis can smell harsh at times, but only moderately so, and it remains a viable alternative for anyone who wants a sweet tuberose scent with oriental base notes and a relatively serious demeanor.
09th July, 2014
Givenchy Ysatis (1984) gives me some new thoughts on scent and memory. It comes from an era when I rarely wore perfume, and didn't pay attention to the state-of-the-art at all.  Still, I remembered it instantly when I found a perfectly preserved vintage specimen recently.

Ysatis is more nuanced than Dior Poison, less car-alarmish than Givenchy Amarige, less cartoonish than Boucheron by Boucheron. There's no doubt it's cut from the same cloth, though. It's a classic 80s signature fragrance.  In the 80s, an era noted for valuing assimilation and aspiration, a signature fragrance wasn't one that made you stand apart, it was one that loudly signaled your inclusion with a group, or affiliation with a type. No one of these fragrances was fatal, but together, they were nightmarish. (note: At this time I lived in New York City, a city of public transportation and confined spaces.) They made me appreciate the ridiculous slogan of the era: Just Say No.

So, memory.  I remember associating this perfume with the go-go sensibility of the 80s. It was a time of gross misproportion, of ill-judged dynamics.  The perfume and fashion of the era might have been set-dressing, but their were indicative, and Ysatis demonstrates the inappropriateness.

Example:  shoulder pads aren't my style, but I can understand their use in suits jackets dresses. In the 80s, shoulder pads were used in short sleeve T-shirts. Imagine a T-shirt so poorly fitted that the bulk of the voluminous fabric hanging about your waist must be tucked into your high waisted jeans. Slapping some packaging material into the shoulders of this T-shirt does nothing to mitigate its inattention to the human form. In fact, it highlights it. The person who wore this T-shirt/jeans combination wore Poison in elevators. Wore Cacharel Lulu to brunch.  Wore clouds of YSL Paris on the RR. Wore Amarige to the gym. You get the picture.

Ysatis shares the era's sin of volume, but it utterly typifies another great miscalculation of the time, which is the overuse of formality.  The market of smart sportswear had yet to be unearthed in the 1980s. The choice was often torn Levi's or a hideous dress, and the hideous dress usually won. A variation of an old bromide was reinvented for the 1980s: If it things worth doing it's worth doing... with ruffles, with chintz, with gris gris, with cheap adornment.  "Jewelry" was stated,"costume" was implied.

Seen from later eras, Ysatis could be considered tasteful version of the big 80s perfumes. But what is the value of a slightly more tasteful monster?  It’s like someone kicking you hard in the balls, but not as hard as he could have. Dominique Ropion is a master of the highly calibrated floral perfume. But for current use, Ysatis lacks the camp of Opium, Poison, Giorgio. They are dated and caricaturish, but they’re fun.  Ysatis, Ropion's tailored monster, is so busy sucking in her cheeks and posing she doesn't crack a smile.  

19th June, 2014 (last edited: 18th May, 2015)
Probably the BEST women's fragrance EVER created, with Poison by Christian Dior coming in a close 2nd place! Oh, I also LOVE Lacoste Pour Femme (similar to Bulgari Blv, but lasts MUCH longer).
28th May, 2014

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