Perfume Directory

Fahrenheit (1988)
by Christian Dior

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Fahrenheit information

Year of Launch1988
GenderMasculine
AvailabilityIn Production
Average Rating
(based on 1483 votes)

People and companies

HouseChristian Dior
PerfumerJean-Louis Sieuzac
PerfumerMaurice Roger
Parent CompanyLVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton

About Fahrenheit

Fahrenheit is a bright "green" fragrance and is popular today, twelve years after it's launch. It is a fragrance that whether you love it or hate it, it is instantly recognisable.

Fahrenheit fragrance notes

  1. Top Notes
  2. Heart Notes
  3. Base notes

Reviews of Fahrenheit

Picture a bunch of Adam Levine fans in a room together. Now picture a Bruce Springsteen fan coming in and wedging himself in the middle of the Levine fans. This is what I see when noticing Fahrenheit among the other colognes at the tester counter at Macy’s.

Fahrenheit is a classic of the old school style, but it’s “classic" nature is timeless and is what makes it so enduring and timeless. It’s like Uncle Jesse or Fonzie. Who wouldn’t think these guys aren’t cool anymore?

Fahrenheit is my signature scent for the fall. I wear it every day from October through November. And I never tire of it. Or get fatigued from it. It’s just that great.
The petroleum smell is there, sure. It’s a gasoline smell of 1988 to be sure, but it transcends that era and fits into the modern age. The gasoline (of whatever combination of notes creates the effect) does not overpower, it makes its grand entrance on center stage – does its solo number under the spot light for about 1 hour, and then dutifully slips back in the chorus with all the other notes. And the other notes? Awesome. Every day I smell something different. Some days I get a whiff of nutmeg (which is why this fits squarely in Fall to my nose) Some days the leather shines throughout. Others, the floral creeps in and takes a solo. It’s as if this was some kind of jazz track, with the petroleum note starting off and each notes taking turns coming in to take a stab at the main melody. And the main melody? The sum of all notes that is Fahrenheit.

I have tried to dissect the notes (as I just tried now) and it always leaves me feeling I didn't do it justice. Fahrenheit is truly the sum of all parts. It’s not a "gasoline" scent. It’s not a "leather" scent. It’s Fahrenheit. You can’t analyze the humor of a good joke and well, sometimes you can’t really take apart the greatness of a master fragrance blend.

So I'll just say that the reason why this is such a great fragrance... is that it smells like Fahrenheit.

Well done!
10/10
12th January, 2017 (last edited: 13th January, 2017)
This has to be in my top 5 fragrances of all time..truelly a piece of genius to incorporate that petrol/violet smell into a fresh green type of scent..I'm talking about the 2016 formulation which I don't think has drastically suffered from reformulation..my last purchase of this would of been in 1998. I prefer the original over the absolute version, I personally don't like that strange sweaty curry smell in absolute.. the aqua version is very nice with added cucumber notes.
24th December, 2016 (last edited: 17th January, 2017)
Reviewing a Vintage 2002 Fahrenheit. Fahrenheit was a sensation in the late 80's, early 90's. I was living in my Bel Ami, Tiffany for Men cloud during those first few years, so I missed the glory days wearing it myself, however always admired it on others. The Violet note as constructed in this, I was to meet later and is what attracts me to Heeley's CPF.
This sample of 2002 has all elements that most remember of the original. Floral Violet sitting on top of a Petroleum Leathery Base. Brilliantly conceived and still stands alone in it's originality. Occurs to me that it projected more in the earlier years, however most of us oversprayed in that Era.
Rightly a Masterpiece.
05th September, 2016 (last edited: 08th January, 2017)
One of the wonders of the world is how this fragrance was ever made, bottled and sold in stores for people to spray onto their skin and clothes. If you want to know what this smells like, imagine an automobile mechanic who changed car oil all day, came home from his job and decided to cut the grass before it got too late, came inside, took off his shirt, and suffocated you with it. Seriously. You smell cut grass, leather, gasoline, metal, and oil. I am not kidding you. I asked a few girls what they thought and they shook their heads and said "no. uh-uh. nope... not for a fragrance". Dior should add grapefruit accords to it for a natural body odor armpit scent to complete it. LOL. If you like it, that is fine. But it is not for me. Thank you for reading my review.
26th August, 2016
I like Absolute version a lot more than current Fahrenheit. Vintage up until 2012 Fahrenheit, though, is superior.

If you can't find 2012 or earlier, get Absolute instead. Or if you like Midnight in Paris, absolute is a richer version of it.
25th July, 2016
Back in middle school in the late '90s, Fahrenheit was THE cologne for guys to have. Problem was, it made the hallways smell like gasoline and leather during a particularly tumultuous time in our lives. To this day, many of my middle school classmates can still smell Fahrenheit in their nightmares. And every time I go into Sephora or Ulta, I pick up and sniff the tester to remind myself how much worse the selection of fragrances was back then. Smelled bad then, still smells bad now, and reformulations over the years haven't changed the nastiness one bit.

Simply put, Fahrenheit almost turned me off from fragrance forever. If it wasn't for sniffing Acqua di Gio on someone in high school, I wouldn't be on Basenotes.
14th July, 2016

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