Perfume Directory

Fahrenheit (1988)
by Christian Dior

Advertisement

Fahrenheit information

Year of Launch1988
GenderMasculine
AvailabilityIn Production
Average Rating
(based on 1521 votes)

People and companies

HouseChristian Dior
PerfumerJean-Louis Sieuzac
PerfumerMaurice Roger
Parent CompanyLVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton

About Fahrenheit

Fahrenheit is a bright "green" fragrance and is popular today, twelve years after it's launch. It is a fragrance that whether you love it or hate it, it is instantly recognisable.

Fahrenheit fragrance notes

  1. Top Notes
  2. Heart Notes
  3. Base notes

Reviews of Fahrenheit

I don't wear it as often as i did in yesteryear but i still think it's one of the best fragrances out there. It's so unique and different from all the others out there. A true classic and very versatile one.
12th August, 2017
Fahrenheit hit in 1988 and was an instantaneous commercial success. It was a bold scent, innovative in concept and execution and was immediately recognizable as something new. It might have been developed using the framework of the fougère, but unlike the other massive launch of the year, Cool Water, it bore little resemblance to the genre. Fahrenheit’s infamous gasoline note gave it an edginess that separated it from other masculine fragrances. 1988 was effectively pre-niche and unorthodox perfumes were rare. Dior bet that there was an unmet demand for a fragrance that didn’t play by the ‘normal’ rules of scent. The combination of gasoline and dehydrated sweetness gave Fahrenheit a deliberately synthetic appearance and distanced it from the fougères and woody chypres that were still the norm for masculine fragrances. The olfactory image of gasoline is convincing. The dryness of woods and the coolness of the violet leaf suggest volatility, like drops of gasoline evaporating from your skin.

To Dior’s credit, they didn’t simply take a traditional perfume and dress it out with ‘avant-garde’ images and a trendy ad campaign. They created a straight-up oddball that didn’t fit easily into existing categories. What’s interesting, though, is that while Fahrenheit was groundbreaking, it wasn’t without precedent. Dior seem to have learned from a few great masculine fragrances of the prior dozen years. The pressurized hiss of violet leaf is a nod to Grey Flannel and the aggressively dry woods are reminiscent of Antaeus. The last piece in the puzzle comes from perfumer Jean-louis Sieuzac himself. Two years before he co-authored Fahrenheit for Dior, Sieuzac composed Hermès Bel Ami, a sumptuous leather chypre with a noticeable whiff of gasoline. He isolated the gasoline note and amplified it to form the basis of Fahrenheit.

Fahrenheit juggled offbeat style and mainstream PR and production streams with remarkable success. Take a look at a network sit-com or an action movie from 1988. Or a fashion magazine. Listen to some 1988 pop music. Most of it doesn’t hold up very well. (see above.) Fahrenheit on the other hand might come off as era-specific, but not dated. It has survived reformulation, the vagaries of trend and an increasingly competitive market yet remains distinctive.
06th August, 2017
Chronologie II

I've always had difficulties to find the words for describing the most beautiful of perfumes.

Overproduction in perfume industry resulted with hundreds of new perfume houses whose offer has already been seen. Too many leather and oud combinations made people smell like worn off russian counts and desert bedouins, and almond, coconut and vanilla are just waking nutritional scents.

Sadly, today one can rarely find a perfume which is strictly made for male or female. New directions are being formed in which undecided perfumes are preferred, so both males and females now smell the same. Just to be straight, I have nothing against this kind of perfumes, because many of them smell really nice and some of them I have in my collection, but first of all I'm an old school kind of guy and my opinion is that a perfume has to have a 'side'. However, as time goes by, and by judging by the offer, the expectations are low that a new perfume, that will impersonate either male or female, will emerge.

In rush of aggressive propaganda which puts niche production in forefront, Fahrenheit still firmly holds its place on top by its originality, beauty, quality and, the most important, masculinity. If there is a male perfume which holds the essence of a real masculine man, then this is the one. It is a cult perfume you can either love or hate, nothing in between, which gives you a feeling that the perfume chose you and not the other way around. I own the first formula, dated in 1987, and every formula that came after it. It has been a bit 'damaged' by reformulations, but still it kept its style and recognizability.

I will finish this review by quoting one man who gave the best description of this masterpiece: When man becomes of my age and looks behind him.. he sees all kinds of things. Ups, downs, joys that take over your being, sorrows that rip you apart strongly enough that you think you can't take it anymore. And now, if I were to sit down and describe that kind of human life on a piece of paper, I would put that paper in an envelope and seal it with Fahrenheit.

The smell of life has the same notes as this perfume...
27th July, 2017
Opium... Bel Ami... Fahrenheit!

Sieuzac was not prolific, but with icons like that on his CV, he could easily make many a nose green with envy.

Fahrenheit was a rebel when it was released, and it still is to this day. A true gamechanger. Not just in the world of fragrance, but probably also for many of the wearers. I know it changed a lot for me.

Fahrenheit was probably the scent, that made me realise, that fragrances are not just nice smells; they can be art and stir one's emotions.

How evocative it was! That almost chameleonic ability to morph between gentle florals and creamy woods, and into a leatherjacket wearing, lawn-mowing animal.

Many say it is more of a winter fragrance, but to me it has always screamed "SUMMER!" From the first spray years ago, it has always conjured up the image of fresh cut grass and a petrol-driven lawn mower. When I need to feel and smell the summer, this is what I reach for.

Ever since that first day, it has been a mainstay of my evergrowing collection, always hanging on to the top, as one of my true favourites.

They say first loves never truly die.

When it comes to Fahrenheit, the saying is most fitting; I will always love this one and have it in my collection.

PS: My mum thought it smelled like pickled cucumbers.
12th July, 2017
Another northbound thumb.

I don't wear it often but will probably always have an early iteration bottle (pre ifra-styrax restriction)in my stable.

Well-worn lawnmower replete with caked clippings slowly composting away. Sour. Honeysuckle. Summer wear appeal.

My nose, oddly perhaps, identifies overlap in its non-floral structure with Or Black.
09th July, 2017
Not my favorite. I bought this on a blind buy when it first came out. This is very strong and does not wear off. It projects down the block and makes my eyes water wearing it. I ordinarily love Dior frags, but this one is a stench bomb.
21st June, 2017

Add your review of Fahrenheit

You need to be logged in to add a review

Shop for Fahrenheit products online

Shop for Fahrenheit at online perfumeries

Search Amazon for Fahrenheit

Member images of Fahrenheit

You need to log in or register to upload images

Private Notes

You need to be logged in (or register here) to use Private Notes.

Advertisement

Advertisement