Perfume Directory

Lapidus pour Homme (1987)
by Ted Lapidus

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Lapidus pour Homme information

Year of Launch1987
GenderMasculine
AvailabilityIn Production
Average Rating
(based on 247 votes)

People and companies

HouseTed Lapidus
PerfumerJacques Konckier
Parent CompanyBogart Group

About Lapidus pour Homme

Lapidus pour Homme is a masculine fragrance by Ted Lapidus. The scent was launched in 1987 and the fragrance was created by perfumer Jacques Konckier

Lapidus pour Homme fragrance notes

  1. Top Notes
  2. Heart Notes
  3. Base notes

Reviews of Lapidus pour Homme

Designer Ted Lapidus launched a masculine nearly a decade before this, one that has all but been forgotten about as a late 70's "me too" in a smoky tobacco and leathery style that was probably better suited to the 1960's. But while Ted Lapidus Pour Homme (1978) serves as only a historical footnote obsessed about by elitest collectors wallowing in the delusion that older and longer discontinued is better, the rebooted Lapidus Pour Homme (1987) proved a far more potent and memorable beast that became a poster child for the "powerhouse" 80's style. The scent is notorious for it's virile undercurrents and strong fruity top, both of which were uncommon in a decade filled with loud but stiff oakmoss scents. It did spawn several flankers, but appears that most of them live in the shadow of the original, which is often called a staple 80's period piece for hobbyists interested in the masculines from the decade. The scent also was a marked shift towards more floral powerhouses that would seek to take the reigns from the mossy and woodsy ones from the decade's beginning, sort of straddling that 1880's-meets-1980's neon dandy aesthetic, and the more austere forthright masculine scents from the late 70's and early 80's. The previous Ted Lapidus Pour Homme was something of an inbetweener too, so this trait being present in the latter Lapidus is unsurprising. The bottle shape epitomizes the steely power and prestige of the 1980's businessman, the "Gordon Gekko" stereotype, but this scent is anything but about business, unless the business at hand is that of making love, to anyone, anywhere.

Lapidus Pour Homme opens with lemon and pineapple -an opening accord later revisited by the much more upmarket Aventus by Creed (2010)- surrounded by light and sweet heart notes of honey, jasmine, and rose. The base is where all the masculine growl in this scent lies, being a sandalwood and patchouli foundation with that same civet/civetone-powered "man skin" glow that Kouros first brought into the world in 1981. Unlike YSL's unabashed and homoerotic ode to machismo, Lapidus tries to come across a little more foppish and colorful, being the Andy Warhol to the Tom of Finland that is Kouros. Projection is of the intercontinental ballistic variety and longevity is that of a radioactive isotope probably found in said missile, so use with care. The drydown is where the similarities between the two uber-masculines really seems clear, but the obviously fruitier and more flamboyant journey Lapidus takes appeals to my sensibilities just a tad more, as I've always been one to prefer the scenic route to my destination if time allows. There's rose here, mixed with honey and jasmine, all notes that would become hallmarks of future floral powerhouses that would cap off the 80's decade before aquatics took over. The base of civet, sandalwood, patchouli, and oakmoss is also pretty strong indicator of where the powerhouse genre was headed in it's final mutations into the early 90's. This scent is just so jubilantly chromatic to me, so joyous in it's exclamation of it's own masculinity and virility. It's not an "alpha male" jock stereotype staring you down across a basketball court with backwards-turned cap, but a man in an open shirt, large belt buckle, and white leather pants, ready to make you feel as you never have. It's here to make it's presence known, but not here to loom over anyone menacingly. You'll feel like the late Freddie Mercury in his trademark yellow jacket, mixed with a bit of Boy George, but with the muscle and martial prowess of Jean-Claude Van Damme. This stuff walks softly and carries a big stick. Well, at least I hope that's just a stick anyway.

Lapidus Pour Homme is a gem among powerhouse masculines and one that reportedly survives modern IFRA regulatory reformulations well, since it was never very heavy on the things now frowned-upon by the organization. It definitely stays just left of any real genre classification outside the powerhouse category, and is a pure abstract creation so far as I can tell. I can imagine the delight among guys in the 80's discovering it's rather unique nature after slogging through the glut of oakmoss and bergamot bombs popular then. It's still a compliment-getter in the 21st century, which is a rarity amongst middle-age scents such as this, since it's not old enough to be considered timeless but certainly not quite relevant to what's going on in male perfumery these days. It's good for 3 seasons of the year but a bit too resinous for hot summers with the honey note. Despite my personal love for it, I wouldn't call this right for everyone, because not every guy is going to enjoy loud, tacky, fruity, and full of "feel like makin' love" swagger, but whether it was the 1980's or nowadays, I'd certainly be put on guard by any man walking into the office soaked in this stuff. It's not a must-buy for every guy, but definitely a must-try for everyone as this simply has to be experienced by anyone seriously into male fragrance: it's that much of an encapsulation of it's era. Lapidus Pour Homme is best used on weekends and time off, days running errands when you wish to cut through a crowd or be the center of attention. Be careful, this old tiger still has his stripes.
08th February, 2018 (last edited: 01st May, 2018)
Not getting any fruit in Lapidus pH. It's all powdery rose and patchouli. Similar to Kouros, so if you're a fan, try this.

Impressive performance. Projects and lasts all day.
31st October, 2017
I love this and cannot wait for the cold weather to wear it, that's the downfall to Lapidus, it's very limited in what kind of climate you can wear it in. This really truly requires bitter cold air to enjoy it's sillage, that and if you apply more then 2 sprays, it's overwhelming, for endless hours. Anything over 60 degrees and it's a nauseating powder bomb but in cold weather, it's this awesome patchouli and oakmoss combo that's creamy in feel.

I had a love affair with this stuff all last winter and wore it quite a bit so I know this scent like the back of my hand. I have a first edition flacon with the blue printed batch code on the bottom and it's the best formula. Lots of note separation with a fat and sweet amber note bathed in incense. I don't really get too much in the way of pineapple or honey in this. The best part for me is the soapy red rose in the heart notes which unfortunately only lasts for about an hour. The drydown is good but not really my favorite. This stuff dries down to a boat load of oakmoss and patchouli and if you accidentally over apply which is very easy to do, the sillage is choking and super powdery that never lets up. 2 sprays from really far away is all that this stuff needs, the walk through approach. It's kind of an intimidating scent to wear as the sillage is over the top ridiculous, absurd actually and kind of unnecessary. I mean, who really needs perfume that's this strong? Was this Ted Lapidus' intentions or was that just the outcome? If you over apply it's a horrid experience where the really long lasting grand finale is patchouli and oakmoss for days that continually projects, it never really let's up where the impression becomes musty like but when applied very lightly, Lapidus produces a fabulous smell. I firmly believe that if this mix was an 80° concentration and not 85° it wouldn't project as aggressively. I know that sounds like it doesn't make sense but the oils in perfume will volatilize faster when the alcohol concentration is higher, and at a slower rate when there's more oil which amounts to less 'sillage'. The one thing I learned from wearing Lapidus Pour Homme is how to properly apply a nuclear strong perfume that took a lot of trial and error.

I gave a 30ml vintage flacon to my boss once upon a time because he loved it on me. I made it a point to stress how strong this is and to apply it with caution. He said he would spray some into his hand after a shower and rub it all over his neck, chest and shoulders really quickly like. The sillage that wafted from him was nice and smelled nothing like it does when you sniff Lapidus up close, at least to me. Believe it or not but I always perceived the overall smell as a fuzzy kind of patchouli scented fabric softener, soapy like that was the olfactory color of dark teal and dark green, more dark teal though. Weird I know but it was pleasant, maybe this is because he applied very little over a spread out area. As an FYI for any guy who's interested in trying this out, the reformulation is not even close and is a sad sad shell of what Lapidus is supposed to be. You need to grab a flacon with the '85% VOL' logo that's embossed onto the front right hand bottom corner. Please don't waste your time with the reformulation. That was the first formula that I had ever tried of Lapidus until I got my hands on a vintage flacon and was blown away. I will say that the reformulation of this is atrocious.
18th October, 2017
The 1987 Aventus..
A power house in the world of perfumery.
Its powerful , and sexy , and smells great .

A blast of bliss that gives ayou a boost of confidence .
May be not suitable for the younger crowd , 35 + .
10th October, 2017
When I smelled this fragrance recently, for the first time I felt like I had been transported to a park, on a cool fall day, sometime in 1987.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE:
I opened the package containing Lapidus Pour Homme that I had recently ordered from Amazon. After sniffing the bottle, I immediately loved the scent that emanated from the wonderfully 80s looking bottle. It was really unique. Reminded me of some place I can't quite remember. A distant memory or imagined?
I decided to try it on before I went to bed. I pressed down on the integrated sprayer and a strong PSSSSSHHHHHHHT hit my chest. And oh my goodness...the scent was a beast. This stuff was so strong it was assaulting my olfactory sense with chains and bats. I was foolish enough to put this on as if it were Vick's Vapor Rub. It was a far cry from the initial smooth smell from the box. I quickly took a whiff of my vintage Obsession, of which I normally can't stand, as it's so thick and heavy, and this time Obsession was like actually light, airy and refreshing compared to the nearly suffocating smell I was breathing in. Somehow I managed to fall asleep.
Woke up the next day and couldn't smell a trace on me.

Gave it to my father later that day, and the day after that he was wearing it. That atomic powered cloud wasn't present on him. Instead it was a very pleasing and refined scent. Just like it was when I first smelled from when the bottle was in the box.

SIMILAR TO :
Kouros and Santos de Cartier.

WHO SHOULD WEAR IT:
Gentlemen 40+ who would be considered to have some class. I can't see a young guy wearing this at all.

CONCLUSION:
Either it didn't mix well with my body's chemistry, or, as others have said, it takes a considerable amount of time before the fragrance becomes well-behaved and amazing.
But that said, it's a great smelling fragrance, at an amazingly cheap price. It's a little too mature for me, but I liked it so much I bought another bottle of it for myself.
I think that it may have lost some of it's longevity because even though it goes on like a beast, I couldn't smell it on me in the morning, and even current Drakkar Noir leaves a skin scent on me in the morning.
But yeah, nice unique fragrance.
09th August, 2017 (last edited: 19th August, 2017)
Lapidus pour Homme comes across as a conventional 80s masculine built on a sandalwood-patchouli core, augmented by honey, and embellished with florals (rose) with one key difference: there's a big slap of a fruity pineapple note. The pineapple persists well into the base and only stops being discernible right at the end.

I'm not a fan of fruity sweetness within a traditional classic masculine structure. Hence, Lapidus pour Homme is not for me. Otherwise, it's a decent composition with obvious virility and old school machismo.

Think of it as Aventus, but worn by Joe Pesci in Goodfellas. There you have the complete picture. Now, that would actually be some much-needed redemption for the Creed.

3/5
01st July, 2017 (last edited: 02nd July, 2017)

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