Perfume Directory

One Man Show (1980)
by Jacques Bogart

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One Man Show information

Year of Launch1980
GenderMasculine
AvailabilityIn Production
Average Rating
(based on 208 votes)

People and companies

HouseJacques Bogart
PerfumerRoger Pellegrino
Parent CompanyBogart Group

About One Man Show

One Man Show is a masculine fragrance by Jacques Bogart. The scent was launched in 1980 and the fragrance was created by perfumer Roger Pellegrino

One Man Show fragrance notes

Reviews of One Man Show

One Man Show must be one of the most audacious names for a masculine fragrance I have ever seen, to the point of initially staying away from it when I first saw the stuff in mall perfume kiosks. I assumed it sold to that narcissistic set of guys that believe in the "Three F's" and no, I won't spell out what they are, but when it and it's house of Jacques Bogart kept coming up in recommendations from fellow basenotes users, I decided to let my gaurd down to try it. Unsurprisingly, this is a loud "typical 80's" aromatic chypre of the "powerhouse" sub-genre, but unlike it's name, isn't quite so brash to actually wear. Those who have worn the previous Bogart by Jacques Bogart (1975) will instantly understand this as a progression on that theme. Perfumer Roger Pellegrino took the biker-meets-boardroom appeal of that debut masculine and cut away all safety restraints, bolstering the top notes and cutting out the leather. I'm not saying this is a flanker, but just a continuation of a dry, aromatic theme in a more boisterous and noticeable direction.

One Man Show opens with bergamot, basil, stiff galbanum, and rosewood, which outside the last one is a pretty grassy, male-centric arrangement. The heart of jasmine and rose is the only real counterpoint to that masculinity, and when the virile base kicks in with a loud woosh, you'll instantly know if you over-applied because all eyes will be on you as it dries down. Castoreum, labdanum, both cedar and sandalwood, plus a dollop of amber touch off the experience. There is surprisingly no oakmoss listed by Bogart, but unless I've lost all sense of smell, I swear some is there. One Man Show sits squarely between Aramis Devin (1978) with it's galbanum overload, and the endless forest of Quorom by Antonio Puig (1981). There is a slight skank to the opening too, so fans of Kouros (1981) and Lapidus Pour Homme (1987) will appreciate the lack of subtlety here, while users of the more dapper Dunhill Edition (1984) will find redemption in the interplay of cedar and sandalwood base notes.

One Man Show is a proper powerhouse that delivers on all fronts for the man still wishing to make this kind of aggressive statement in the 21st century, although more moderate guys might relegate this to the history books because unlike other early 80's classics such as Oscar de la Renta Pour Lui (1981), this one has "no chill" and eschews balance in favor of projection. It sits confident and uncaring if you approve or not, but despite that stance, has spawned a half-dozen flankers and still surprisingly does sell. It's certainly no fumigator like Joop! Homme (1989), but if you wear this anywhere except outside on a cold winter day, people WILL notice you, and just like the title of the juice, you will indeed become your own "One Man Show". Recommended use is obviously cold months, but this really has no context that suits it best outside a vintage 80's nightclub or a brisk walk in February, on the waterfront. You'll be the only out there anyway, so what does it matter? I love scents that encapsulate a period or personality, so I give it 4 stars and thumbs up, but I also realize this is for the serious enthusiasts only nowadays, which suits me fine.
20th February, 2018
Bogart's One Man Show has a reputation preceding it, of its hyper masculine demeanour, and being able to clear rooms on account of its strength. While all of this is rather exaggerated, there is indeed an element of truth. I find One Man Show to be dry, sharp and even aggressive at times. It opens with a sharp accord of citrus, basil and galbanum; very soon the leathery attribute announces its presence, and this feature is similar to leathers such as Versace L'Homme and Van Cleef & Arpels Pour Homme. There's an astringency in One Man Show, and this persists throughout the mid phase where the herbal elements persist, there is an added note of incense, and any floral element is barely discernible. In the base I register some mossy woods and labdanum. Duration is excellent and sillage is good based on a moderate application.

Unlike the excellent leather of Bogart (Signature / Classic, 1975), One Man Show reveals a few cracks that prevent me from having an overall favourable impression. It seems a little unbalanced in its 'masculine powerhouse' style, with the emphasis being on masculine; there is no contrasting note or accord to complement the assertive leather and the woods. While certain tastes will no doubt appreciate One Man Show, personally it seems to carry too much baggage of the 80s' excesses - in the wrong ways; additionally, it lacks in sophistication and can be perceived to be crude, and its style appears somewhat dated as I write this review in 2018, if not largely irrelevant.

3/5

(Note: Review is based on a bottle from around 2011.)
31st January, 2018
Take Signature from the same house (a standard russian leather type)... add a bit of conifer. It all vibrates as masculine spice.

Great value. Safe blind buy. Real close to Quorum. They're all good to me.
03rd January, 2018 (last edited: 11th August, 2018)
I grabbed a vintage flacon of this and was prepared for something vile and guess what, not even close! This is actually a very pleasurable scent and quite wearable mind you that turned out to be far better then what I was even expecting but, there's a few minor let downs to One Man Show for me personally although they're not the big deal at all, really.

The formula that I'm referring to is a first formula with the '85' on the front of the flacon, not '85 % VOL' which is a second edition formula and 'certainly' not that reformulation with the '87% VOL', don't even waste my time with those as those are all mere shadows and shouldn't even be considered for anything of comparison purposes, ever. These are my observations, pay close attention because my observations are accurate.

This is not a strong scent to begin with, pretty mild actually and I'm an individual who's very sensitive to how strong my sillage and projection is, I feel very uncomfortable wearing things that are 'beastly'. One Man Show opens with a waxy candle like texture and smell that really cannot be picked apart but it smells good, there's no other way I could possibly explain this. The overall olfactory color of this through out is pale green and gray which matches the color of the flacon and box perfectly. The blending is a tad too much for my own personal preferences as there's not really any particular note that sticks out per se until the far drydown. The heart notes have a mild and tolerable slightly bathroomy carnation accord followed by a soapy and subdued rose with some incense where everything feels like a tamed down Van Cleef & Arpels Tsar at this point. Once the drydown hits I kid you not, One Man Show turns directly into a Rochas Macassar 'light', and when I say light I mean very light, about 75% there. Where Macassar is truly a heavy duty perfume for endless hours, One Man Show is completely wearable at any stage and frankly, very light with okay lasting power as a skin scent at the 12 hour point with arms length sillage for the first few.

The far drydown of One Man Show is a suede like leather followed by jasmine, patchouli, amber and castoreum, very awesome smelling but like I've stressed prior, light, not heavy or beastly at all, honest. This is not a pine scentric perfume at all, it's a leather, jasmine and patchouli perfume with castoreum and amber as supporting roles that smells 'exactly' like a neutered version of Rochas' Macassar but toned way down, not that this is a bad thing at all. It is for me because I already own lots of Macassar and wear it on the regular so I'm more then familiar with that stuff which I love to death. Also, both of these perfumes just happened to have debuted in 1980 so I get that One Man Show is a much less expensive and blatant copy of Macassar, the similarities at least on my skin or so uncanny and ridiculously obvious at the drydown point that after I wore this a few times I laughed when the association clicked and it was as clear as day. Jacques Bogart is not a high end perfume house to begin with although his perfumes are all great but One Man Show is a total spin off of Macassar that's been done with respect and panache so kudos to this perfume house for accomplishing this giant feat very well.

There's also a tiny bit of Furyo lurking around in this, I can smell it, but where Furyo is a civet, cinnamon and overtly flowery dandy bomb, One Man Show is quite classy and completely 100% wearable at any point in it's development. Seriously, nobody, and I mean no one should at any time feel intimidated to adorn this, extremely pleasurable scent that completely took me by surprise. If you like this, go and try some Macassar that'll really blow that head clean off, now that stuff is truly a beast of a perfume that lives up to the 'powerhouse' genre.
17th October, 2017
OMS - if you want an old school, beast mode fragrance, look no further. But don't let the time period, reformulation or insanely low price keep you from owning this one. Even after all that, OMS is a very talented performer. At first spray it's a sort of basil green aromatic scent which settles into a floral to wood development that reminds me of something you'd wear to a smokey casino in old Vegas. It's kitschy, yet has a charm of it's own. Very masculine and powerful. One spray and you're good to go. Worth the $20. You won't wear it everywhere, but at this price you'll reach for it often enough. No doubt, a thumbs up.
22nd August, 2017
To be honest I didn't expect that much from this fragrance based on my experience with "Silver Scent" also from the brand which is terrible in my opinion but "One Man Show" really surprised me!

This fragrance opens up with a fresh, lemony, herbal, green and peppery aroma that smells kind of like "7Up" and "Sprite" but more intense! bergamot gives the opening a beautiful masculine old school fresh vibe while pine needle and basil giving it bitter green and bright woody aspect and finally lots of patchouli creating a strong peppery aura around all mentioned notes.

As time passes some sweetness joins in and some floral notes showing their faces. the peppery part gets smoother and green and herbal part gets a little bit stronger.
The base of the fragrance is almost the same as mid and it's a semi sweet, warm and kind of bitter green, woody and floral scent the overall smells really nice.

The whole performance right from the start till the end is a classic journey so if you're not into classic fragrances in general ... stay away!
Projection is really good and solid and longevity can easily reach 8 hours and more so don't worry about them.
To use it properly without annoying anybody and also yourself the weather must be at least cool so except summer you can wear it easily in all remaining seasons.
You can't go wrong with this especially with it's very cheap and affordable price!
31st March, 2017

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