Iris Poudre (2000)
by Editions de Parfums Frederic Malle

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Iris Poudre information

Year of Launch2000
GenderShared / Unisex
AvailabilityIn Production
Average Rating
(based on 238 votes)

People and companies

HouseEditions de Parfums Frederic Malle
PerfumerPierre Bourdon
PackagingFrederic Malle
Parent CompanyEstee Lauder Companies

About Iris Poudre

Iris Poudre means 'Powdered Iris' in English. The fragrance is an aldehydic floral, so may be too feminine for some. Created by 225 who also created classics such as Cool Water

Iris Poudre fragrance notes

Reviews of Iris Poudre

Sharply pretty: nothing romantic or touching about it but tough, modern and likeable. It mellows a little in the far drydown. Nice to wear and a salutary shake-up after lots of vintage.
29th November, 2017
I was really hoping to love this one because Iris Poudre sounded like just the kind of thing that would up my sophistication game. I have a decided lack of floral aldehydes in my perfume repertoire, but wanted to change all that after falling for Amouage Gold. Here, I thought, was an even more classy, glamorous scent that would prove that I have good taste after all!

No such luck. I really like the opening foray: the citric aldehydes bubbling away and the delicate florals that make me think of Chanel, but soon something I could not recognize or name started to make me go increasingly squinty-eyed. This note (or notes) smelled chemical and synthetic in a highly unpleasant way--a scratchy, irritating melange of...something. I still don't know what this/these woody-ish base notes are (ebony??), but I do know whatever it was ruined my interest in this particular Malle. Oh, well, I'll always have Une Fleur de Cassie.
05th October, 2017
Elevator to the Gallows by Louis Malle 1958
09th September, 2017
rbaker Show all reviews
United Kingdom
I get the iris fairly early on, after the slight orangey-bergamot citric opening blast rescinds. It is a dry iris that on me is never really sweet by it itself. It is characterised by a light and fresh contemporaneous powderiness that is never stuffy or crusty.

The drydown sees an enhancement of the floral core of this creation, mainly jasmin with while florals like magnolia, which are freshened up by a decent lashing of alhehydes - hence the comparisons with Chanel No.5.

The base sweetens gradually, with ylang-ylang and a fairly restrained tonka impression coming to the fore, underlined by a nonspecific amber-infused woodsiness. Still, the iris remains palpable until the end.

I get moderate sillage, very good projection and seven hours of longevity on my skin,

This spring scent is a lovely take on the iris theme, although at times a tad too predictable and several notches in quality below the great and incomparable Iris Gris. Still, one of this house's more memorable products. 3.5/5.
02nd August, 2017
I've worn and loved No. 5 since I was 19, so it is probably all too logical that I'd like this perfume. I definitely smell a lot of similarities, although Iris Poudré has a few twists of its own. It does smell very powdery, so much so that I have a hard time detecting iris, but I don't particularly mind.
Projection seems very good, there's a very nice and pleasant cloud around me as I type this. Unlike Carnal Flower, where I actually preferred the scent straight up and didn't enjoy the dry down, this one smells fresher and more pleasant in the air than on my skin.
If I didn't already have No. 5, I would consider getting this. As it stands, I will pass for now.
06th December, 2016
Despite the name, Iris Poudre is neither very powdery nor very iris-heavy. Boy, it’s beautiful, though. Wearing it feels like a celebration. It envelops the wearer in a white, balmy, creamy cloud of aldehydes and sweet flower petals, with subtle hints of a cool, floral iris glinting like pearls threaded into layers of white tulle. When I wear it, I feel like I’m ten again, digging through my mother’s clothes and playing dress-up with her costume jewelry.

The sweetness, almost like honey or amber, hiding behind the skirts of Iris Poudre always takes me by surprise. It is a sugared cream wave that gathers force and builds behind the thin wall of glittering aldehydes, and when it breaks, together they create that balmy, pearlescent cloud of scent particles that moves with your body like a shoal of tiny silver fish.

And yet, inside the lift of aldehydes, I sense something chemically abrasive and woody that tugs against the creamy, bland perfection of the scent. It’s not unpleasant, and in fact, it makes the scent all the more interesting to me. It is not, as I first thought, the natural sharpness of soap, but rather the pressurized air just released from pulling a tab on a can of soda (after shaking) – that same unbridled, expectant air of “something is about to happen” that I get from Chanel No. 22 and Baghari, both scents to which Iris Poudre may be compared.

The chemical sharpness of aldehydes in general, therefore, there to give the same boost to a fragrance that the propellers of a plane does, and tasting as much of metal and forced air as champagne. I can live with that. Actually, I really like this edge of modernity, that glancing dash of metal in a fragrance that is otherwise all about soapy, old-fashioned glamour. It makes it as abstract and as modern as that other supersonic, aldehydic floral, Chanel No. 5. But I would far prefer to wear Iris Poudre.
26th March, 2016

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