Sel de Vetiver (2007)
by The Different Company

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Sel de Vetiver information

Year of Launch2007
GenderShared / Unisex
AvailabilityIn Production
Average Rating
(based on 256 votes)

People and companies

HouseThe Different Company
PerfumerCéline Ellena
PackagingThierry de Baschmakoff

About Sel de Vetiver

Sel de Vetiver is a shared / unisex perfume by The Different Company. The scent was launched in 2007 and the fragrance was created by perfumer Céline Ellena. The bottle was designed by Thierry de Baschmakoff

Sel de Vetiver fragrance notes

Reviews of Sel de Vetiver

I have tried SdV a few times now, last being yesterday. I persist doing so because of the overwelmingly positive reviews from revered basenoters. Right now I have the opportunity of purchacing it in a formidable price... however, I just don't like it enough. SdV is dry, it has a distinct mineral accord and indeed it is to me earthy more than anything else. It isn't giving me much pleasure wearing this fragrance. I am aware that vetiver is rooty but the combination with minerality here puts me off and I cannot discern other notes and enjoy SdV. So liking vetiver does not equal that one automatically likes even niche vetiver-centered fragrances. One think I can say confidently is that for vetiver lovers SdV is a must try.
07th February, 2017
Leafing through collections of Greek myths, over-and-over I encountered descriptions of grey-eyed Athena. Youngling I was, my mind found it difficult to interpret the epithet as anything but a signpost to material fact, praising the goddess' rare and lovely form.

Grey eyes are, of course, a physical feature, but I grew to appreciate the finer points of their vagaries. Athena blesses or curses: turning an orgulous weaver into a spider, granting her mirrored shield to Perseus, blessing Athens with the olive tree. Likewise grey eyes can gleam blue or green. Growing up, growing more comfortable with myths and their rich chains of association, I acknowledged grey as quiet glory. Not tired or old but ageless and fresh.

As with the goddess, so too with Sel de Vetiver.

Genre-bending (floral-herbal-marine)till it emerges sun-drenched and sea-tossed on uncharted shores. Vetiver with the gentlest bite of grapefruit, the fizz of a vegetal gin accord and the impossible evocation of salt. Earthy but lively, with the effervescence of sea spray and the mute fathoms of the open ocean.

Self-assured, winsome, serious.

18th January, 2017 (last edited: 21st January, 2017)
A very light, subtle interpretation. There are some types of vetiver products - special fractions or molecular distillates - which emphasise the 'clean' aspect and omit the more earthy components of this material. It wouldn't surprise me if Sel De Vetiver owed something to this type of vetiver used, as much as the surrounding notes.

Other reviewers have compared it with Guerlain's Vetiver but I think that is a much more pungent and spicy perfume. This one is more like Carven's classic Vetiver, but considerably milder.

Whether it is salty is a moot point: sodium chloride has no smell at all of course. Whether it has some seaweed or ozonic component to support the name is anyone's guess, probably not. Its main characteristic is unobtrusiveness; it is more a suggestion of a perfume than anything very definite, you can wear it without being aware of it at all and it's unlikely to clash with anything. It is refined and understated.

I mainly bought this product for the packaging, which is very good quality. A box with intricately folded double walls, a thick glass bottle with heavy polished cap fitting beautifully with a soft click. Real Rolls Royce standard.
21st June, 2016 (last edited: 11th October, 2016)
Lovely. A fresh, soft, breezy citrus / floral / vetiver. Vetiver is always there, but not full frontal, in your face, as many vetivers are. It's whispy, fresh, cool, light and bright, like a breath of fresh summer air carrying the faint scent of flowers. I don't get salt, but I don't think I know what salt smells like. I do definitely get the outdoor theme though. It reminds me of Guerlain's vetiver for its clean, outdoor freshness, but this is more complex, more subtly floral, cleverly unisex. It's a young couple, laughing, walking hand in hand along a country lane on a beautiful summer's day, ok maybe a coastal path as a nod to the salt that I confess I can't smell as a note. My only criticism is that it is very soft and fades quite quickly, but otherwise it comes very close to my idea of the perfect Summer scent.
June 2016
12th June, 2016
Vetiver and grapefruit opening that immediately reminds me of Terre d'Hermes. As the grapefruit wears off, the vetiver begins to develop towards a peppery grassy note, with a bit of citrus sweetness, ala Guerlain. However, Sel de Vetiver takes it's own direction from here, with iris, geranium and sea salt blending through the grassy familiar notes, making for a very unique and distinguished vetiver fragrance. The iris is prominent, but not in a Dior fashion. It lays beneath the vetiver, yet is enough to get your attention. I don't find this as salty or oceanic as say Sel Marin, just more of a twist on a common theme.

Office safe, unisex, average sillage and longevity. I like this and appreciate the appeal, but not sure if I will put it on my wish list. Reminds me of several scents I already own. Excellent none the less. Thumbs up.

15th March, 2016
It has been a long time since I've worn a vetiver fragrance. My only real love was Annick Goutal's now watered-down version, which was a superb, earthy, but herbal and refreshing Vetiver. I had my own, and every man in my family owned a bottle, because I gave it to them.

It was hard for me to imagine there being much new to say in the genre, but I clearly need to examine my preconceptions. TDC's Sel de Vetiver certainly tries to get a few words in, but I'm not sure it quite succeeds.

The opening *almost* works. That titular salt is there, cleverly twinned with a bit of grapefruit (hey! A greyhound cocktail! Neat!) but the chemical carrier (Calone?) delivering it is also palpable, and it almost spoils the effect. I think that Calone leaves me somewhat anosmic the same way some aldehydes seem to do--either that, or the fragrance becomes very muddled for about an hour. Either way, it's probably not intentional in a composition that I think is aiming for a natural, atmospheric effect.

What I do get after the chemical whiff is a 3-D glimpse into the Northern California coast--majestic, sculptural coastal pine forests, wild iris, and all. It's wobbly and in-and-out of focus, but when I catch it, it's perfect. It's a little like watching an flickering image on a television station with bad reception, for those of us who remember such things.

Once this begins to dry, it kicks off some pretty, floral notes, and a trace powdery scent that I don't see listed in the notes--probably a fixative musk. (I also couldn't tell you for the life of me the difference between "Vetiver" and "Haitian Vetiver"--an unusually pretentious statement in an otherwise straightforward fragrance pyramid).

I imagine this fragrance would work best on fabric, to extend its most distinctive features--the salt at the beginning, and that rich, piney accord. I'm still deciding if I want this or not, but every time I smell it, I lean closer to a yes, if nothing else so I can return to the forest.
12th March, 2016

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