Average Rating: 4

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    Breath of God Fragrance notes

    Cedarwood, Rose, Ylang Ylang, Vetiver, Lemon, Grapefruit, Neroli, Black Pepper, Sandalwood, Cade

    Breath of God information

    This fragrance is a blend of B's Inhale and Exhale

    Reviews of Breath of God


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    Showing 1 to 6 of 30 reviews.

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

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    Genre: Woody Oriental

    Breath of God blends Lush’s previous scents, Exhale and Inhale, and since the two left contrary impressions, I was curious to experience the combination. Exhale is an austere blend of smoky leather, vetiver, and musk, in a style reminiscent of Chanel’s Sycomore or L’Artisan Parfumeur’s Dzongkha. I enjoy it enough to keep a bottle. Inhale is a sweet artificial fruit fragrance with chemical overtones that are more unpleasant than interesting. I find it at once crass and incomplete. Their unlikely alliance in Breath of God is touted as one of the oddest structures in contemporary fragrance, but as much as I enjoy the result, Inhale and Exhale together yield what seems to me a more conventional scent than either alone.

    To wit, Inhale’s citrus and amber atop Exhale’s vetiver and woods amount to a sweet, resinous oriental fragrance with antecedents as far back as Shalimar and Habanita. It’s good, but nowhere as peculiar as either of it’s components. On the plus side, what smelled truncated and grating in Inhale finds needed support in Exhale’s base notes. The result is much more gratifying than Inhale alone, yet at the same time Breath of God lacks the dramatically gaunt profile and stark chiaroscuro that make Exhale so compelling. Forced to choose between these three offerings, I’d take Exhale, but as it’s no longer being offered I the US*, I’ll settle for endorsing Breath of God.

    *Since this review was originally posted, Lush has seen fit to reissue Exhale in the US.

    09th June, 2014

    MFfan310's avatar

    United States United States

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    Ignore the fact that it's sold at Lush and costs only $30. This is another bargain-priced fragrance that can compete with far more expensive ones.

    Breath of God is a fragrance of paradoxes: smoky yet fresh, dirty yet clean. It's hard to describe, but easy to wear. If there's a Lush store or counter near you, make a stop by to sniff it.

    14th November, 2013

    Diamondflame's avatar

    Singapore Singapore

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    Hellish start but a heavenly ride

    It's been a while since a fragrance intrigues me. With a name as audacious as Breath of God, it could only be an irreverent take on perfumery. I wasn't far off base as it turns out. The opening is tarry, dark and smoky, thanks in part to a good dose of cade - it's like standing next to a pit of boiling tar. But the next phase was unexpected - a petroleum vibe with floral slightly fruity nuances joining in the smoke. The smoke gradually recedes, the scent becoming an airier combination of sweet resins and creamy woods, and acquires a texture somewhat reminiscent of smooth well worn nubuck leather.

    Was I impressed yet? You bet I was. And thankful too. This was a ride that started from hell but ended up in high heaven.

    Pros: Intriguingly attractive
    Cons: Opening can be rough on beginners"

    29th September, 2013

    zztopp's avatar

    United States United States

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    Vetiver of Gods.

    Notes:

    Neroli, lemon, melon, jasmine, rose, vetivert, sandalwood, cedarwood, amber and musk.

    I encountered "Breath of God" (BOG) at a Lush store at a local mall - the Lush store was located next to a Sephora store and bombarded by teen fashionistas but that didn't prevent me from venturing inside and getting my hands on this bottle of captivating dark vetiver juice.

    BOG has interesting top notes - imagine the diesel fumes of Knize 10 mixed with citrus-melon notes cut and softened by floral notes with the volume of this combination of these supposedly "ghastly" notes turned all the way down so that the top notes accord comes off as breezy blast of driving through the Smoky Mountains 5 miles behind a tanker. There is a woody undercurrent of cedar which leads to a smooth, slightly rooty vetiver base which blossoms after sometime on skin. Imagine a more unique and better cultured version of Vetiver Extraordinaire. BOG might just make some believe that yes, there is a God.

    27th July, 2013

    RichNTacoma's avatar

    United States United States

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    Rollercoaster of love?

    This is quite a ride, this fragrance. I read a comment about it that made a Harry Potter Hogwart's reference, and I get that. For me, think the perfumed sheets after a Middle Earth love fest between a dark wizard and a fairy. Ok, I get that there is probably nothing intelligible about that, but it make sense to me wearing it.

    I get a lot of bonfire, almost like a peated single malt. Bog and sweat. It is sexy one minute, and almost too much sicky sweet another.

    Do I like it? I am not sure, I can say I appreciate its intensity and uniqueness. I can see myself wearing this only every once in a while. Quality parts, but what of the whole?

    10th July, 2013

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    busy

    Gorilla Perfume’s Breath of God gets the sweet/savory balance that has become one of the go-to references on see-it-not-taste-it TV food competition shows.  The sweet/salty comment has become part of our expertise-without-in-fact-experience vocabulary. It’s a function of our pop quest for unearned authenticity that is the logical outcome of distressed denim.  Other such food show comments have to do with  ‘a little more acidity’,  better mouth feel, or the benefits of sous vide preparation. Reality TV has left us spring-loaded with such vocabulary. We really are fucking ridiculous.

     

    But Breath of God gets kudos. Prada Candy, with it's talk of benzoin, would convince us that it is a salted caramel, and therefore stakes a claim to salty/sweet sophistication.  Breath of God reaches for more and gives us an oyster and melon raw bar, completing the triangle with mint. It's ingenious, and makes a refreshing sense.

     

    The drawback is that although the accord is appealing and distinctive, the execution is murky. Similar to other Gorilla fragrances (also Tokyo Milk fragrances) there is an unfortunate blurring of notes. A bit more separation would give a more dynamic quality. Breath of God suffers from the aromatherapy conundrum.  Just as in mixing essential oils, it's easy to have a blurring rather than a synergy.  A solution might be to use it as scenting for personal care products.  Another Lush/Gorilla product, Dirty, is better in Lush's hair paste than as a stand-alone perfume.

     

    Lush doesn't compete with Tom Ford, by Killian, or Guerlain. It's more like the Etat Libre d’Orange alternative to the Body Shop.  Breath of God could use what my grandmother called ‘a friendly hand’ to spruce up its composition, but it is a brilliant perfume in its inventiveness.  It is attractive and distinctive. It's memorable. It wears well and doesn't fall apart.  It would be easy to dismiss it as quirky if you don't look closely.  Give it a bit of consideration, and it'll change your point of view.

     

    from scent hurdle.com

    16th May, 2013

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