Géranium pour Monsieur (2009)
    by Editions de Parfums Frederic Malle




    Average Rating: 3.5

    Based on 191 ratings
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    Géranium pour Monsieur Fragrance Notes

    Géranium pour Monsieur information

    Géranium pour Monsieur is a men's fragrance by Editions de Parfums Frederic Malle. The scent was launched in 2009

    Reviews of Géranium pour Monsieur


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    taint it sweet's avatar

    United States United States

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    A fresh mint opening with a nice, masculine dry down. This one is great from start to finish and doesn't ever get too much like toothpaste. It's my favorite mint and just smells clean.

    05 October, 2014

    Longwei's avatar

    Poland Poland

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    OFFICE TEST:
    Female 1: 3.5/5, Impression: subtle but sexy
    Female 2: 4/5, Impression: sweet and spicy, reminds me of sambuca
    Female 3: 5/5, Impression: fresh and very sexy
    Male 1: 3/5, Impression: smells nice(ish) but not something I’d wear
    Male 2: 2/5, Impression: too ‘girly’
    Male 3: 1/5, Impression: a very strong soapy smell with a hint of very very mild aniseed
    Projection: average
    Longevity: at least 9h
    My opinion:
    This is a blast. An explosive equilibrium of freshness and sweetness, both taken to an unusual register with mint and geranium. Your reception of this one will probably depend on your personal olfactive experience with geranium. I remember it from childhood, as a pot plant on the window sills ay school. Maybe that’s why it seems naive and playful to me.
    As you see above, it is probably also very sex biased. Women do seem to like it a lot. So, if you’re a straight man, you may not like it yourself, but it may still be a good investment:P
    This way or the other, I think it’s very nice and pretty original, if a bit too bubbly.

    12 June, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

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    Let’s get one thing out of the way. Geranium is not, I repeat, IS NOT, in the strictest sense a floral note. To the best of my considerable horticultural/botanical knowledge, geranium flowers are utterly without scent. (By the way, the “geraniums” that grandma grew in her window boxes, and the scented “geraniums” from which geranium oil is extracted are not even geraniums at all, but members of the allied genus Pelargonium.) Natural geranium oil is derived from the leaves of the rose-scented Pelargonium. While geranium shares aromachemical content – particularly geraniol – with rose, and is used in many rose reconstructions, it does not smell exactly like rose. It has a peculiar bittersweet, astringent, herbaceous-aromatic character about it, one that occupies a territory bounded roughly by mint, sage, and lavender. Those who complain that they can’t smell the geranium in Geranium pour Monsieur are probably sniffing for a rosy floral note, and they’re not going to find one in this decidedly dry, aromatic composition.

    Now as for Geranium pour Monsieur, it has been a hard fragrance for me to come to grips with. I own a bottle of it, not because I necessarily like it (though I may decide I do), but because I’ve been wearing it often just to figure it out. As others have pointed out, it’s not actually geranium, but mint that headlines this scent, and mint is notoriously one of the hardest notes to use effectively in perfumes. Not only is it conspicuous and resistant to blending; it is also instantly recognizable, and hence distracting. On top of that come the seemingly inescapable associations with toothpaste, mouthwash, and chewing gum.

    How does a perfumer employ mint without suggesting an oral hygiene product? Dominique Ropion does it in Geranium pour Monsieur by harnessing mint to a team of bitter aromatics, including geranium, that are so patently inedible that the resulting accord could never be mistaken for anything you’d willingly put into your mouth. The astringent, mildly camphoraceous aspect of geranium oil is the structural link that binds the mint to the rest of this scent’s aromatic elements, and its use in this respect it tremendously clever and original. In fact, clever and original apply to Geranium pour Monsieur’s entire structure. I can say in all honesty that I have never smelled anything quite like it.

    The first phase is bracing mint and bitter, dry, savory aromatics that deliver a sharp slap on the face. The accord is cool, clean, and medicinal. It’s also unusual in that it makes no pretense of naturalism. It smells not of any recognizable collection of herbs plucked from the ground, but rather smells proudly of aromachemicals (natural or otherwise) , selected and arranged with clear intent and objectives. In this respect it resembles certain scents from Comme des Garçons or Etat Libre de Orange’s notorious Sécrétions Magnifiques, and while it’s equally provocative, it does not employ any notes that are inherently harsh or discordant. What it does do is take olfactory abstraction to a whole new level. Sure, there’s a freshly scrubbed and shaved aspect to Geranium pour Monsieur, but this shave took place in a barbershop on Mars. Geranium pour Monsieur’s crisp, cool phase persists for an hour or two at most – not all that long, but too long for me to think of it as top notes. While it persists it is moderately potent and projects a comfortable distance from the skin: detectable at arm’s length, but never distracting.

    The phase that follows is such a complete contrast that it could almost be a whole new scent. In the blink of an eye, Geranium pour Monsieur goes from icy aromatics to a dry, woody skin scent that’s built on soapy musks and sandalwood. As different from the first phase as it is in content, the second phase is still resolutely clean, and sustains the rigorously abstract style. The musks are not trying to smell “natural” in any way. They instead suggest an amplified trace of soap on just-washed skin. A true skin scent, the second phase of Geranium pour Monsieur wears very close and is not easy to detect at any distance.

    Beyond its unusual bimodal olfactory progression, Geranium pour Monsieur represents several achievements for Dominique Ropion: he has succeeded in composing a mint fragrance that does not smell like toothpaste; he has created an aromatic fragrance for men that smells nothing like a traditional fougère; and he has built a “clean,” refreshing, modern fragrance without a trace of the stereotypical calone, ozone, fruit, or aquatic scent components. What I can’t decide is whether I like the way it smells.

    09 June, 2014 (Last Edited: 14 June, 2014)

    Anosmia Amnesia's avatar



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    Why mint? I'm not one to object to the price of perfumes, but come on, mint is a bit on the cheapo side, don't you think? Ok, maybe Ropion was tired of bergamot openings and wanted something a little different. Well then, how about lemongrass? Juniper? Galbanum? I'm not crazy about eucalyptus, but what about eucalyptus? But why a freaking Peppermint Patty!

    However, if you summon the strength it would take to ignore a monstrous carbuncle on the face of a beloved friend, (Prince Charles' best line,) you can look past the mint and detect the pink geranium above a beautifully done sharp green stem, making a wonderful raspy-floral-earthy accord very much like the headspace over a thriving geranium plant. At this point I am considering forgiving Ropion for the sharp mint and only rebuking him for his heavy hand with it, because the high clear note does add considerable "alertness" to the picture.

    The heart is completely fresh, without any of that "just stepped out of a shower" malarkey. I get a bit of the neroli Teardrop referred to. And thank goodness D.R. left out the soap and the baby powder, and kept it very far away from any barbershop I ever was in.

    In all, this is a beautiful and very masculine floral, very different, very interesting and very easy to wear. Just why so much dog-gone mint?

    12 May, 2014

    rogalal's avatar

    United States United States

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    The first few times I tried Geranium Pour Monsieur, I just didn't like the mint. Coming back to it a couple of years later, the mint doesn't bother me - what once seemed like a tremendous mistake now feels integrated and thought-out.

    To my nose, Geranium Pour Monsieur basically takes all the facets of natural rose geranium and exaggerates them, so it's got more minty brightness, more flowery nuances, more licorice undertones, and more leafy greens. It's kind of like someone colored in a picture in a coloring book using the right colors, but much brighter versions of the right colors, so the whole thing has a weird sort of exaggerated vibration to it that makes it surreal.

    In the end, I sort of like Geranium Pour Monsieur now, yet somehow, hours in, I just stop caring, and this is something that seems to happen with all the geranium scents I've tried. I love geranium as a supporting actor (I love the dark heft it give to Encre Noir or the deep green it lends to Guerlain's Vetiver), but I tend to tire of it in a starring role.

    10th May, 2014

    ION-ONE's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Mint is normally a non-starter for me in a fragrance so I knew I was in for a challenge when the first sniff literally resembled a peppermint mouthwash. The opening is an intense saccharine sweet icy mint - It really does smell like you've spilt some mouthwash. The overall feel from the mint is cool - fresh and invigorating. For me, the mint never disappears but becomes less intense. As the mint becomes more muted the other notes become discernible. There is a pleasing modern green fresh floral that emerges. Quite linear and predictable. An overall translucent Ellena-esque feel adds an air of lightness.

    When actively concentrating on the scent all I could find was mint. It was only when I 'took my eye off the ball', forgot what I was wearing that the other pleasing notes emerged - and then it felt like I was really wearing a balanced fragrance not like I had an accident with my bathroom cupboard! The overall journey reminds me of how it might smell when Davidoff get round the developing: Cool Water Mint Blast.

    Overall a perfectly pleasant modern masculine fragrance. This is a very socially acceptable scent - almost focusing upon what general society takes to be agreeably fresh and non-offensive. No one could complain about this one on public transport or in the office. Ironically this is where my problem starts. I am more that happy to smell this on others, and would be happy to smell like this fresh out of the shower - but as a fragrance its just not my cup of tea. Perhaps its just got too much mass-appeal, its a slightly compromising composition that seems eager not to offend. Definitely an anti-powerhouse. Recommended for those who object to that "old man smell".

    To be fair I was predisposed against this, and just couldn't get over the mint - so would have to give a neutral. Its a cruel irony that our least favorite notes are always the strongest most long-lasting! I would, however, not hesitate to recommend this to someone looking for a mint dominated niche fragrance or someone looking for a fresh modern masculine on the proviso that they don't mind mint.

    28 January, 2014

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