Nuit de Chine (1913)
by Les Parfums de Rosine

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Nuit de Chine information

Year of Launch1913
GenderFeminine
AvailabilityDiscontinued
Average Rating
Not enough ratings.

People and companies

HouseLes Parfums de Rosine
PerfumerMaurice Schaller

About Nuit de Chine

Nuit de Chine is a feminine perfume by Les Parfums de Rosine. The scent was launched in 1913 and the fragrance was created by perfumer Maurice Schaller

Nuit de Chine fragrance notes

Reviews of Nuit de Chine

This is a fougere similar to (but significantly better than) Mouchoir de Monsieur. Nuit de Chine was inspired by Fougere Royale and, in turn, was the perfume that inspired Guerlain to create Mitsouko.

Nuit de Chine is a fougere built with the key accord being sandalwood and peach (persicol). The main floral note is rose d'orient.

Other important notes are labdanum, a high dose of animalics (civet, etc), musk, patchouli, vetiver, lavender, bergamot, geranium, ylang ylang, orange blossom, and a touch of jasmine and spices.

In my opinion this is the best of the classical fougere fragrances and the most novel (due to some clever trickery with animal chemicals in the base).
23rd December, 2016
I am reviewing a vintage edc.

Persicol, a peach lactone, used six years later to more acclaim in Guerlain's Mitsouko, takes center stage here.

The Persicol, lavender and coumarin give one that fougere blast upon first application. The florals are few - jasmine and rose. There are spices - cinnamon and clove. The concentration of ingredients is in the base: amber, musk, civet, sandalwood, which give it a leather-like undertone.

The result is an excellent fougere, resembling more the simple Fougere Royale but without the anise-like ingredients that made such classics as Royal Fern, Wild Fern and Canoe reference fougeres.
10th April, 2014
bokaba Show all reviews
United States
Upon first smell, I noticed much of the top is no longer with us, but that was to be expected from an 80+ year old perfume. At first blush, I would categorize Nuit de Chine as an oriental fougere and its similarity to Mouchoir de Monsieur is uncanny though not unusual as they were released within eight years of each other and probably of popular style at the time.

The opening is dull and unexciting, but the coumarin/tonka accord so cherished from MdM comes to the fore except that Nuit de Chine uses real—yes, that’s right—real civet and deer musk in the composition. I have smelled these tinctures before and can say with much certainty that this is so. The longer it sits on my skin the fecal yet floral nutty aspect of the civet becomes greater.

Nuit de Chine is also known for its resplendent sandalwood note—natural Mysore, of course. It is restrained and adds a light buttery texture and slight hints of Chinese incense.

I am not sure why Rosine chose to name their fragrance “Chinese Night”—perhaps it was to inspire visions of the Orient. Nuit de Chine was also a popular French song in the 1920s, though it was released after the perfume. Poiret had originally named his fragrance Nuit d’Orient as he favored Oriental perfumes.

It is difficult to give a note construction for such a long lost perfume that is so disconnected from what we know as fragrance today. I would guess that it contains an opening lavender-coumarin accord for the basic fougere effect inherited from Parquet’s not so distant Fougere Royale in addition to some florals and spices perhaps jasmine, tuberose, cinnamon, orris, and rose. The base is a coumarin haze augmented by civet, musk, sandalwood, and vanilla. There may also be traces of vetiver and cedar here.

Overall, if one has smelled Mouchoir de Monsieur, especially a vintage formulation, one is not missing much in Nuit de Chine. However, if artistry and the best ingredients available are important, Nuit de Chine is not to be missed (also note that Turn of the Century perfumers likely had easy access to the best perfume ingredients ever available). Unfortunately, Nuit de Chine and Poiret’s other masterpiece, Le Fruit Defendu, are probably the things of which perfume dreams are made—far outside our grasp.
05th November, 2013
bokaba Show all reviews
United States
Vintage Oriental Fougere

At first blush, I would categorize Nuit de Chine as an oriental fougere and its similarity to Mouchoir de Monsieur is uncanny though not unusual as they were released within eight years of each other and probably of popular style at the time.

The opening is dull and unexciting, but the coumarin/tonka accord so cherished from MdM comes to the fore except that Nuit de Chine uses real—yes, that’s right—real civet and deer musk in the composition. I have smelled these tinctures before and can say with much certainty that this is so. The longer it sits on my skin the fecal yet floral nutty aspect of the civet becomes greater.
Nuit de Chine is also known for its resplendent sandalwood note—natural Mysore, of course. It is restrained and adds a light buttery texture and slight hints of Chinese incense.
I am not sure why Rosine chose to name their fragrance "Chinese Night"—perhaps it was to inspire visions of the Orient. Nuit de Chine was also a popular French song in the 1920s, though it was released after the perfume. Poiret had originally named his fragrance Nuit d’Orient as he favored Oriental perfumes.
It is difficult to give a note construction for such a long lost perfume that is so disconnected from what we know as fragrance today. I would guess that it contains an opening lavender-coumarin accord for the basic fougere effect inherited from Parquet’s not so distant Fougere Royale in addition to some florals and spices perhaps jasmine, tuberose, cinnamon, orris, and rose. The base is a coumarin haze augmented by civet, musk, sandalwood, and vanilla. There may also be traces of vetiver and cedar here.
Overall, if one has smelled Mouchoir de Monsieur, especially a vintage formulation, one is not missing much in Nuit de Chine. However, if artistry and the best ingredients available are important, Nuit de Chine is not to be missed (also note that Turn of the Century perfumers likely had easy access to the best perfume ingredients ever available). Unfortunately, Nuit de Chine and Poiret’s other masterpiece, Le Fruit Defendu, are probably the things of which perfume dreams are made—far outside our grasp.
08th September, 2013
I cannot stifle my curiosity about the older vintage fragrances.
However, they are a roll of dice.
Is this the inspiration of all the clean and laundry detergent scents out there?
It smells exactly like laundry detergent. Harsh. Soapy. bleachy-skin.

18th April, 2013

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