Perfume Directory

MEM (2017)
by Bogue Profumo

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MEM information

Year of Launch2017
GenderShared / Unisex
AvailabilityIn Production
Average Rating
(based on 11 votes)

People and companies

HouseBogue Profumo
PerfumerAntonio Gardoni

About MEM

MEM is a shared / unisex perfume by Bogue Profumo. The scent was launched in 2017 and the fragrance was created by perfumer Antonio Gardoni

Reviews of MEM

Bogue seems to make scents that I genuinely admire, but don't want to actually wear. Maai was a bit too bombastic for me and O/E, too synthetic, (although I nearly bought a bottle of Aeon 001). MEM, unfortunately, also fits into to my "interesting, but unwearable" category. When I took my first sniff of this fragrance, I was in heaven; for approximately a minute and a half, MEM smelled very much like the heavenly scent of a horse's mane and/or hide. Unfortunately, this amazing olfactory sensation was gone in a flash, only to be replaced by an amazing array of unidentifiable notes, which were in turn, replaced by other unknown ones. This dizzying swirl finally died down to a sort of civetty, herbally, lavendar. Although I am usually a big fan of civet, here the note lent less of an animalic growl and more of a clean, fresh urine aspect to the progression.

I think a few folks who are naturally inclined to love anything new and avant-garde in perfumery, will find MEM intriguing. It is definitely kaleidoscopic and unusual and will keep you sniffing at your wrists in sheer wonderment.
10th September, 2017
This is the perfume that made me want to start writing again about perfume, if only to spread the word about how brilliant it is and how everyone who invests in perfume as art should buy a bottle. I got a sample from Luckyscent and spent the next few days struggling to understand it enough to write about it.

My basic description would be dirty lavender marmalade: Jicky dragged through the quinoa section of the health food store, covered in earth, incense, and floor wax, and lifted up into the air with the malty fizz of champagne. All of this nestled in a burned-sugar floral accord that smells a bit like tuberose but isnít tuberose, a complex series of smoke and mirrors designed to lead your nose out of its depth.

Unusually for a modern perfume Ė although this isnít really a modern perfume Ė MEM reveals its true complexity in the base, where a silty, musky ambergris lights up all the other elements like a blowtorch. Antonio used real animalics for the base, and it shows. The perfume is complex, beautiful, and abstract, far more so than even Maai. By far one of the most exciting perfumes Iíve put on my skin lately.

29th August, 2017
I'm probably not politically correct enough to enjoy MEM. Instant revulsion on my part when I put this on. I left it on to see if it would morph into something I would ever consider wearing, but no. MEM smells to me like the hand lotion Aunt Bessie bought at Woolworth's Drug Store back in 1974. This has an old lady smell to my nose. I could detect some woods lurking under the surface, but they were so overcome by the florals and old lady vibe, that there was no way for me to get any enjoyment out of this frag. I also picked up some funk, and I see now why, as civet is a listed note. This is a busy mess, and reads like a case of fragrance by blender. There is some movement during the course of the wear,and MEM eventually lightens just a tiny bit on the old lady floral funk, but not nearly enough for me.
24th August, 2017
MEM covers a lot of ground and it covers it quickly. When first sprayed it moves too fast for precise description and feels more like slam poetry than anything olfactory. Itís a 'Tomato-Jasmine Waxed-Sultry-Jam Malted Milk-Tuned Rubber Gasoline-Flame, Drop-The-Mic-And-Howl' sort of perfume. Itís a rush.

MEM is Antonio Gardoniís discourse on lavender and it is packed with lavender. Lavender is never hidden, but you might give a double-take on recognizing it. MEM combines identifiable clues and completely new shapes and never settles for one definition of lavender. It knocks lavender from its comfortable perch in the pantheon of perfume materials and makes it sing for its supper. Working with a material like lavender has two specific risks. The first is that it is one of the most well-known material in fragrance and is consequently predictable. Trying to make it say anything new is difficult. The second is that changing the rules will always threaten a percentage of people. Dismantling an olfactory Ďbaselineí is like pulling out the rug. MEM might very well find a good portion of its audience in a state of distress or disorientation.

MEM is also something new for Gardoni. His previous perfumes for Bogue were an out-and-out interrogation of 20th century perfumery. (*) MEM doesnít look to the past as these other perfumes did. It does however share their sense of provocation. These perfumes were conceptual and they were daring. Their success was made more meaningful in large part because they risked failure so unwaveringly. MEMís risk of failure is just as great. The challenge is not just how to make a novel lavender perfume, itís how to win people over to ĎThe New Lavender.í Anyone remember New Coke?

As an olfactory object, lavender is weighted down by associations. Itís floral, herbal, medicinal, antiseptic. Itís grand-dadís aftershave, itís the grocery store wipes, itís the pastry from the bakery. Itís everywhere. Gardoni confronts lavenderís dual tragic flaw: familiarity and predictability. Rather than try to Ďreinventí lavender per se, Gardoniís trick is to make it unexpected.

A set of almost tropical floral tones steers clear of typical depictions and frees lavender from associations with aromatherapy, cleaning products and the barbershop. The perfume sidesteps the top-heart-base pyramid without settling for a linear model and the progression of the perfume has a deceptively wandering feel. An expressive collection of woods braces the perfume and a pack of animalic notes come and go as if prowling through the perfume. MEM meticulously avoids lavenderís clichťs and none of the old chestnuts (leafy greens, sudsy soap, chilly mothballs, shaving cream) find their way into the mix. By peeling away lavenderís expected characteristics and altering its momentum, Gardoni renders it abstract and bends it to his purposes.

At times the perfume seems to create a broad olfactory milieu and has a striding, environmental scale. But even when itís impressionistic (sap, soil, metal and sunlightó-oh, an afternoon working in a garden) itís remarkably specific. The accords pass by steadily, giving the feeling of being taken on a guided tour of the objects in an imagined olfactory Cornell Box. A waxed grapefruit. Carmelized tomatoes. Flowers, champagne, cats and brackish water. A bizarre collection of images? Sure, but also elegant and logical.†

The success of the perfume hangs on building new chains of associationó-constructing a new lavender. I donít get the impression that Gardoni is making an emotional appeal or trying to woo you. Rather, what he gives the audience is a richness, and more important, a clarity of ideas to play with as they care to. Whether or not the odd olfactory imagesó- coconut woods, grape-soda white flowers, doggedness, clay-rich soil, rubber citrus bark, dappled markings, orange jam, flat beer, leather-soled shoesó-speak to you or not, they have a precision that lets you string together the pieces to suit your own inclinations. I feel like Iíve been handed an extraordinary coloring-book and some crayons in gorgeous hues that Iíve never seen before. Thereís no need to worry too much about creating an imageó-the lines are drawn. Iím just having a blast discovering these new colors.

The coloring-book analogy might sound ridiculous, but Iíve found a playful mindset is an effective line of approach to MEM. For all the specificity of the perfume, Iím reminded how scrupulously Gardoni avoided getting caught in a single definition of lavender. Lavender enters this discussion as possibly the most overdetermined note in perfumery and Gardoniís role was to free it. There is an appealing modesty to the way Gardoni helps you find your own lavender rather than convince you of his.

from scenthurdle.com
20th July, 2017
MEM is a bold, positive and necessary progression for Bogue. the billowing layers of lavender manage to sidestep obvious fougere associations, which is no mean feat. MEM plunges into uncharted gourmand oriental while retaining a lurking civet card that only reveals itself in the long drydown, showing crucial restraint. this is an extremely complex and ever-shifting frag that will retain its interest for a long time. another home run but with a different bat from Signor Gardoni!
07th July, 2017

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