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  1. Animal Perfumes: Civet

    (from: The British perfumer: being a collection of choice receipts and observations ... By Charles Lillie, (c.1740) edited by Colin Mackenzie, 1822)

    CHAPTER IV

    ANIMAL PERFUMES

    CIVET


    Civet, like the foregoing substances, is very liable to adulteration; but is very well known in a state of purity. It is an excrementitious substance taken from a large double glandular receptacle, situated at some little distance beneath the tail of the civet ...

    Updated 8th May 2010 at 10:49 AM by Petra Ichor

    Categories
    Vintage
  2. Animal Perfumes: Ambergris

    (from: The British perfumer: being a collection of choice receipts and observations ... By Charles Lillie, (c.1740) edited by Colin Mackenzie, 1822)

    CHAPTER IV

    ANIMAL PERFUMES

    AMBERGRIS


    Whether ambergris be a natural or artificial substance has not yet been wholly determined, even by the learned, though it is pretty generally thought, to be the excrement of some fish. This opinion is warranted by the fact, that when dissolved in spirits ...

    Updated 5th May 2010 at 05:05 PM by Petra Ichor

    Categories
    Vintage
  3. SotD Wednesday 5 May

    Quote Originally Posted by kumquat View Post


    Guerlain - Après L'Ondée
    The infamous fragrance of violets in the rain.
    Melancholy and joy at once, as when the sun peeks through a rain cloud.
    Heartache is painful, but the memories of love are sweet.

    Notes: heliotrope, vanilla, iris roots, anise, violets, and carnations

    Updated 29th January 2012 at 04:52 PM by kumquat

    Categories
    Uncategorized
  4. Part 3: The Naturalist - Effects Of Seeds Plants Perfumes &c.

    (from: The Mirror of literature, amusement, and instruction, Volume 30, 1838)

    The following extract, from an entertaining Essayist in the New Monthly Magazine for 1823, ( Art.— The Repasts of the Ancients,) may well be placed in juxtaposition with the excerpt I have given from the Court Journal. “Ogni medaglia na il suo reverso,” say the Italians, and this forms a curious subject for consideration:—

    “Having exhausted their invention in the confection of stimulants ...

    Updated 5th May 2010 at 01:18 PM by Petra Ichor

    Categories
    Vintage
  5. Part 2: The Naturalist - Effects Of Seeds Plants Perfumes &c.

    (from: The Mirror of literature, amusement, and instruction, Volume 30, 1838)

    A single Parisian petite maitresse uses more perfumery in one day, than all the ladies of Rome put together for a year. It is the foreigners who take off the little that is consumed: but it is a singular fact, that even these, however fond they may be of flowers and perfumery, lose their liking for them, after a residence for any length of time in Rome, as I know from personal experience. The English alone, ...

    Updated 5th May 2010 at 05:07 PM by Petra Ichor

    Categories
    Vintage



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