Blog Comments

  1. roro's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Bavard
    Most excellent post on your vanishing sticker-label No. 19 edt with Swiss connections. 19-ml is a good size for that one. I'm thinking of doing No. 19 as my fragrance in Monsieur Montana's discuss-a-fragrance-for-three-days game.
    Thanks, Bavard. I was pretty excited when I figured out the significance of those Liebermann Waelchi stickers.

    19ml is a goodly amount.

    Those mini bottles of No.19 parfum that you presented in Monsieur Montana's thread are something I have never seen over here. Really interesting.
  2. roro's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Bavard
    Lovely. Hopefully there's plenty of 70s Chanel in Japan to go around.
    It's out there. The extrait is the easiest to spot, as you probably know, due to the simplicity of the labeling.
    When it comes to dating the EDTs, the stickers are a nice clue to have, especially when the box is missing.
  3. Bavard's Avatar
    Lovely. Hopefully there's plenty of 70s Chanel in Japan to go around.
  4. Bavard's Avatar
    Most excellent post on your vanishing sticker-label No. 19 edt with Swiss connections. 19-ml is a good size for that one. I'm thinking of doing No. 19 as my fragrance in Monsieur Montana's discuss-a-fragrance-for-three-days game.
  5. roro's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Cook.bot
    No, I don't think I ever did. And it's too tiny to scan or photograph, barely bigger than my thumbnail. Let me see if I can find an online image of it. It's very cute.
    It must have been something -- or someone -- else. I do seem to remember a post you made along those lines. . . ah, I remember what it was. And I have a hazy picture of the images in my mind. Tissue paper was involved. Some samples with unusual packaging, maybe? Sorry to be so vague.

    That Hermes booklet sounds very interesting. I've never seen anything like you describe.
  6. Cook.bot's Avatar
    And what's this about an Eau d'Hermes book? Maybe you did a show-and-tell in the forums, but I can't find the post now.
    No, I don't think I ever did. And it's too tiny to scan or photograph, barely bigger than my thumbnail. Let me see if I can find an online image of it. It's very cute.
  7. roro's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Cook.bot
    It seems like almost all my bottles of vintage "Y" have come with little pamphlets. Love that. And then there's Eau d'Hermes, and the adorable tiny book that came with the coppertops.
    None of my bottles of Y have come with pamphlets. And what's this about an Eau d'Hermes book? Maybe you did a show-and-tell in the forums, but I can't find the post now.

    If the traditional Japanese numbering of years meant that you had to memorize the begin dates of emperors' reigns and then calculate forward from that, then I can understand the switch to Western numbers!
    The only era I have any kind of handle on is Showa, because I know the year I was born and can calculate forward or backward from there.

    I do see addresses and even phone numbers written using all Japanese characters from time to time, but it strikes me as a bit precious in this day and age. But what do I know? I'm a gaijin.

    五八二ー四四九七
    vs.
    582-4497

    It's probably the simplicity of Western numerals that explains their prevalence. All can be written by hand without lifting the pen (although some do for 1, 5 and 7). Also when typing, the Western numerals have dedicated keys, and have since the days of the typewriter. But even on a computer, it takes some doing to get Japanese numerals to output.

    That's my theory, anyway.
  8. Cook.bot's Avatar
    It seems like almost all my bottles of vintage "Y" have come with little pamphlets. Love that. And then there's Eau d'Hermes, and the adorable tiny book that came with the coppertops.

    If the traditional Japanese numbering of years meant that you had to memorize the begin dates of emperors' reigns and then calculate forward from that, then I can understand the switch to Western numbers!
  9. roro's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Cook.bot
    I love finding these bits of paper ephemera tucked into an old perfume.

    Here's a question, non-scent related: since there's no Western text at all on the postcard, why do you think they used Western numerals all over it?

    I do, too. The little strips of paper that come with some vintage perfumes (e.g. Patous) are always a nice find.
    This postcard cleared up something I'd long wondered about Eau Libre, which made it especially cool.

    I'm not sure why, but Western numerals are used far more often today for just about everything. Does it look odd to you? I guess kanji characters are still more commonly used for ordinals.

    You may have noticed that the number 1976 does not appear on the card. That's because they used the traditional year designation 昭和51年, which is Shōwa 51, or the 51st year of the reign of Emperor Shōwa (Hirohito).
  10. Cook.bot's Avatar
    I love finding these bits of paper ephemera tucked into an old perfume.

    Here's a question, non-scent related: since there's no Western text at all on the postcard, why do you think they used Western numerals all over it?
  11. roro's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Cook.bot
    Ah. The inscrutable logic of Roroland.
    I think you get it.
  12. roro's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Cook.bot
    I can't believe you've never sprayed that No. 19 metal flacon! You amaze me.

    It's a funny thing. In this case, my concern is that I'll press the nozzle and nothing will happen, or it won't stop spraying til it's empty. There's also the real possibility that it might not smell good anymore. I don't want to know! This way, I can continue to imagine it as the Platonic ideal of No.19.
  13. roro's Avatar
    Good to see you, and thanks for the comment.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cook.bot
    Are you joking or serious about thinking it might be fake? And does the disappeared label text influence your thinking?
    That bit about the bottle being fake was an attempt at humor. A bit arch, perhaps. It was a jab at a well-known guide that declares "All Chanel bottles have been made by Verreries Brosse". You know the one I'm talking about.

    Regarding the label -- I don't follow you. Influence in what way? (edit: Never mind! I see what you meant now.)

    That is an odd bottle mark. It looks like a number 8 and a human ear.
    Ha! I didn't make that connection. "That's a human ear all right." - Blue Velvet
    I've since found the same mark on other 19ml bottles, but not on any other sizes.
    I'm not sure how to describe it. "S in a lens"? "Snake in a boat"?

    You didn't mention the smell of it. Is it good?
    Ah, I didn't, did I? It smells fabulous. I was getting whiffs of the most gorgeous sillage while photographing the bottle with its cap off.
    Updated 27th March 2020 at 11:22 AM by roro
  14. Cook.bot's Avatar
    I can't believe you've never sprayed that No. 19 metal flacon! You amaze me.
  15. Cook.bot's Avatar
    Are you joking or serious about thinking it might be fake? And does the disappeared label text influence your thinking?

    That is an odd bottle mark. It looks like a number 8 and a human ear.

    You didn't mention the smell of it. Is it good?
  16. roro's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by HouseOfPhlegethon
    What a unique find! I know I've never seen one before.
    Thanks for the comment!
    You mean a "flacon pour le sac", or just this particular type?

    I dug up a couple of pics of the older, all-metal version. It feels a bit primitive compared to the metal-skinned one, but there's a certain charm in that.







    My jewel in the "pour le sac" series is an early No.19 spray. Even the canister is metal! I have never pressed the nozzle -- too afraid.


  17. HouseOfPhlegethon's Avatar
    What a unique find! I know I've never seen on before.



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