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The Fragrance Industry

Critiques and observations of the business of perfumery

  1. Shared Notes, Booze and Perfume: Juniper, Wormwood, Angelica

    It may not be so strange that there are some notes that alcoholic beverages and perfumes have in common. Or perhaps it is. In any case, the three big ones I am thinking of are juniper berries, wormwood, and angelica.

    Juniper Berries

    Probably the most famous use of juniper berries (actually, they are the seed cones of the shrub Juniperus communis) in alcoholic drinks is as the main flavoring in gin. Gin made in different places can also contain any of the following: anise, angelica
    ...

    Updated 19th March 2010 at 10:27 PM by JaimeB

    Categories
    The Fragrance Industry , The Art of Perfumery , Personal Reflections
  2. Deconstructing a Rose is a Rose, is a (not)Rose

    OK, so this all began when I was looking over some things in an old book. I say old because the fame of the more recent book by this author has eclipsed the one I was looking at. Called The Secret of Scent (2006), this is Luca Turin's first mass-market oeuvre. It's a kind of a dense book, not just a series of one- or two-paragraph critiques of commercial scents like its more famous successor. This one is about the chemistry of scent and the way our nose functions to detect smell, and what perfume ...

    Updated 20th September 2011 at 08:30 AM by JaimeB

    Categories
    The Fragrance Industry , The Art of Perfumery , Perfume History
  3. Some Arab Contributions to Perfumery

    The contributions of many cultures are joined together in the modern art of the perfumer; but taken all in all, a rather large number of important contributions to the art of perfumery can be traced to Arab and Islamic history, science, and commerce.

    Let us consider some contributions by category: The discovery and collection of (and commerce in) aromatic materials; the development of technological refinements in perfume making; and the concepts of standardization and marketing or perfumes.
    ...

    Updated 11th March 2010 at 09:07 AM by JaimeB

    Categories
    The Fragrance Industry , The Art of Perfumery , Perfume History
  4. Animal Notes in Perfumery: History & Analysis, Part 2

    Continued from Part 1...

    Civet is a perfume material formerly obtained from the civet cat, various genera of which form the family Viverridae. African civet cats were the ones historically raised for the harvesting of their "musk," a material produced by both male and female civets from a gland located in the perineum, the area around the animal's anus. The animals were formerly killed to facilitate the removal of the material, but more recently, it has been obtained by scraping
    ...

    Updated 22nd February 2010 at 02:38 PM by JaimeB

    Categories
    The Fragrance Industry , The Art of Perfumery , Perfume History
  5. Animal Notes in Perfumery: History & Analysis, Part 1

    For a very long time now, perfumers have been using animal products in finished perfumes. Of course, by far the largest number of perfume materials are either plant-based or (since the late nineteenth century) synthetic. All things considered, it seems odd that animal products were ever discovered as perfume materials, given the evident pleasant smell of flowers, resins, woods, and so on. Why did people ever go beyond those to harvest some very unlikely, and on the surface, very unpleasant animal ...

    Updated 22nd February 2010 at 02:39 PM by JaimeB

    Categories
    The Fragrance Industry , The Art of Perfumery , Perfume History
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