Blog Comments

  1. Aiona's Avatar
    LOL! If Montale Black Aoud had been a guy, he would have been one of the chemistry majors who rolled out of bed at 7:55 AM to go to an 8:00 AM class and to choose a seat next to me thereby ensuring I would never date him ever.
  2. Possum-Pie's Avatar
    I must disagree with Brad Pitt, My wife and I believe "til death do us part" is a strong motivator to work out our problems...so we do. Alas, with fragrances, some mornings I wake up and say "Montale Black Aoud, it was a nice fling, but now I am tired of you and you must leave."
  3. Aiona's Avatar
    Anucci Man.
  4. mcolson's Avatar
    So what was the name of the fragrance you liked so much that day???
  5. Primrose's Avatar
    Thank you for sharing.

    Metabolic disorders like diabetes will cause a person to have a sweet or vinegar scent to the skin.
  6. awesomeness's Avatar
    Great story. It made me smile. Thanks for sharing.
  7. Aiona's Avatar
    Y'know, ECaruthers, when I did the Blind Sniff in March 2011, veteran sniffers encouraged us to spritz on paper, as that tends to make top notes last longer versus on skin. It did seem to do that.
  8. Redneck Perfumisto's Avatar
    Cool!

    I totally agree - you can overwhelm skin with enough fragrance, and measure things early enough in development, that everybody's skin is the same. But when you count not only the genetic and consequent biochemical variations in the skin, but also the resident flora and fauna (in turn highly dependent on a myriad of factors, including chemical history and moisture and....and....), it's clear that no skin is the same by the time you get into the heart of a fragrance, and especially by the time you're down to the base.

    It's a complex equation, and provided that you don't skew things into sameness by tilting the game, differences are easily observed, if not always easily explained.

    I'm a believer in observational science - be those observations the patterns that Turin sees, or yourself. Nobody is in a better position to see the effects of pregnancy on scent than the scientist herself!
  9. Chicagoista's Avatar
    Absolutely wonderful! I salute you for going so in-depth on this subject.
  10. sherapop's Avatar
    Great examples, Aiona!

    Brava!
  11. ECaruthers's Avatar
    Thanks, for quite a lot of new information,Aiona. I also believe that skin temperature differences are likely to effect how fast 'fume components evaporate from the skin. Skin chemistry might add some extra fragrances to the mix. Chemicals on the skin's surface might even react with and destroy some components so they never make it to your nose. I don't know any studies that show whether these are large or tiny effects or, if they are large, whether they are important only in pathologies or are a large part of our different reactions to the same scents.

    But I do have a test to suggest. Can you go through a store, test a bunch of scents on paper, pick one you like, and buy it without applying it to your own skin? This must work well enough for enough people - after all the stores provide the test strips. But some people say, "I don't care what it smells like on paper; I don't care what it smells like on someone else; I only care how it smells on me." I think their skin chemistry must be different.

    As a variation on this test, try spraying your old favorites on paper - an unscented kitchen paper towel will do. If they smell wonderful, maybe it is just your skin that's changed. But if you don't like them any better on paper than on your skin, then maybe it's something in your nose or brain that has changed.
  12. Nostalgie's Avatar
    Fascinating! Thanks, Aiona!
  13. Redneck Perfumisto's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Sugandaraja
    When I think of recent trends among my generation back in Canada, I can easily see a time when personal fragrance simply isn't in the culture. More than gourmands and fruity-florals, what I mostly see women my age wearing is... nothing at all, fragrance-wise. Fragrance counters are, despite the endless new-releases, on the decline. I remember the Bay a decade ago had a whole floor dedicated to perfume; now that area is mostly make-up, with fragrance as an afterthought.

    For better or worse, I see today's ''grandma smells like powder'' to be ''grandma smells like perfume'' tomorrow.
    Scary. Just..... scary.

    Great review - some real food for thought.
  14. Sugandaraja's Avatar
    I must admit powder inherently smells grandmotherly to me, through associations of the favored florals of a generation now either deceased or pushing their ninth decade ( namely, my grandmother and her generation ). I have no such associations with vintage chypres, but a good many older florals and orientals took a time for me to be comfortable around and not make me think ''I smell like grandma'' ( no offense to grandmothers everywhere ).

    When I think of recent trends among my generation back in Canada, I can easily see a time when personal fragrance simply isn't in the culture. More than gourmands and fruity-florals, what I mostly see women my age wearing is... nothing at all, fragrance-wise. Fragrance counters are, despite the endless new-releases, on the decline. I remember the Bay a decade ago had a whole floor dedicated to perfume; now that area is mostly make-up, with fragrance as an afterthought.

    For better or worse, I see today's ''grandma smells like powder'' to be ''grandma smells like perfume'' tomorrow.
  15. Aiona's Avatar
    I'm almost embarrassed to say, Twolf! It was Must de Cartier. And I believe, it's prior to reformulation. The first one, that is.
  16. Twolf's Avatar
    Gosh, what fragrance was it? Please, do not let us die here of/with curiosity.
  17. Aiona's Avatar
    True. And is it the finite-ness that makes it so much more special? I dunno. But I'm trained to try to make people less finite. And thus, sometimes it is hard to let go. I need palliative care for perfumes, I guess. Agh!
  18. odysseusm's Avatar
    Good musings. The things we enjoy, we want to hang on to. But the enjoyment moment is always that... a moment. Sometimes a cluster of moments, but always finite. That's life.
  19. debbborra's Avatar
    It's probably good I read this but disturbing. I now hear the ticking of the biological clocks of a hundred sample bottles, and they are LOUD!
  20. Grottola's Avatar
    Great blog - fragrances are finite even when they're on our skin, just ask Roger & Gallet Extra Vielle! But I guess it's the finite nature of things that gives them their beauty

    I kept a little mini of Tuscany by Aramis that my dad gave me when I was a kid....taking it out of my drawer a few months ago, it unfortunately only smelled like alcohol!
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