• Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets

      In the wrap-up to this series we will find out where to buy sandalwood oil, sandalwood wood and list the various uses and markets for this enlivened product.

      First let's step back in time to a sandalwood report published in 1925.


      SANDALWOOD OIL INDUSTRY OF INDIA
      Journal of the Royal Society of Arts
      Vol. 74, No. 3813 (DECEMBER 18th, 1925), pp. 119-120
      Published by: Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce
      Article Stable
      URL



      Over the past 15 years the price has increased on a compound basis by 16 % per annum.

      The trial harvest of Australian album oil by TFS in 2011 sold for $US4,000 per kg. This was an 80% premium on the 2011 spot price of $US2,100 per kg. Today Mysore sandalwood oil has a spot price of $US2,500 per kg.

      TFS anticipates that it will be the dominant global producer of Santalum album sandalwood by 2020. The markets for sandalwood include perfumery, religious statues and prayer beads as well as incense and medicine. Currently in R&D is a wart removal trial using sandalwood oil.

      The world now has a reliable, legal and sustainable supply of Australian album (Santalum album) sandalwood. This will deliver stability for the market uses noted above.

      This has been a series of sandalwood dreams which have turned into a heightened and sustainable reality.

      Australian album Sandalwood Oil GIVEAWAY

      Basenotes draw: 1 of 8 sampler ~5ml bottles (as pictured in Part 7) of Australian album sandalwood oil, courtesy of TFS.


      How to enter

      Please leave a comment below letting us know something new or interesting that you learnt from any section of the Series of Sandalwood Dreams.

      Please note that the gift recipient postal addresses will need to be given to TFS for the mail-out. This giveaway is open to anyone, anywhere in the world.


      Draw Now Closed




      TFS Contact Information

      If you would like to experience Australian album sandalwood oil or wood the contacts are:

      Home and Small Business buyers - TFS products page

      Commercial Quantity
      Australian album Oil - TFS commercial enquiries
      Australian album Wood - TFS commercial enquiries

      TFS Video


      Related articles






      Sandalwood Dreams Series - by Jordan River


      1. Myths & Dreams
      2. The Perfumed Chamber
      3. Planting Santalum album Sandalwood in Australia
      4. Harvesting
      5. Grading, processing and shipping to the distillery
      6. Distillation
      7. What does it smell like?
      8. Uses and Markets

      About the author Jordan River
      Author AvatarJordan River is the host of The Fragrant Man and also writes for Olfactoria's Travels and Australian Perfume Junkies. Jordan has been been reading Basenotes and other fragrance websites for the past few years and enjoys the confluence of subjectivity, knowledge and opinion. He is not a Perfume Pontiff and is always happy to be enlightened by your own knowledge and challenged by differing opinions.

      Share:

      Comments 93 Comments
      1. Jordan88888888's Avatar
        Jordan88888888 -
        Quote Originally Posted by Birdboy48 View Post
        A very interesting set of articles ! I imagine that TFS is anxious to get on with their harvest, as 14 years is a long time to wait. In time, perhaps they will be growing even older trees ?

        I was particularly impressed by their greenhouses, and the number of seedlings they are producing every year !
        En pointe Birdboy48. Imagine if they waited 50 years! You would be reading this story in 2063. Half a lifetime in this day and age. Your name has flown into the hat for the draw.
      1. Jordan88888888's Avatar
        Jordan88888888 -
        Quote Originally Posted by Pharmacist_Blender View Post
        I've been fiddling around with the replacement arochemicals (ebanol, javanol, santaliff, sandella) for ages trying to find something I like. I'm excited to get a sniff of this new supply!!! I'm thrilled to hear the santalol levels are so high!
        Aha, something new to put in your potions! And a name for the draw; Pharmacist_Blender.
      1. Jordan88888888's Avatar
        Jordan88888888 -
        Quote Originally Posted by joshuaang View Post
        I have learnt, rather superficially, that Australian album sandalwood smells similar to Mysore sandalwood, only stronger, although I'd have to smell it for myself to decide! Great series, Jordan
        Always the best way Joshua Ang. Only your nose knows what it knows. It will be interesting to smell this batch in 10-years. It will be a collector's item and it may even be in your collection. It will also be interesting for you if you win so into the draw goes your name.
      1. Jordan88888888's Avatar
        Jordan88888888 -
        Quote Originally Posted by demcav View Post
        Reading this series of installments about TFS's success in reestablishing santalum album as a sustainable species is truly a dream come true! "One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind!" Thank you for sharing this wonderful news, and a chance to sample the results!

        Dream come true; Yes! Hope yours do too demcav. In this case patience and vision played a big role in actualization. Your name just leaped into the draw.
      1. Switch245's Avatar
        Switch245 -
        I found it very interesting that Germany was the principle buyer of raw mysore sandalwood in the 1900s. Not the first country that would come to mind! The series was concise and nicely written; well done Jordan.

        Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk
      1. Jordan88888888's Avatar
        Jordan88888888 -
        Quote Originally Posted by DuNezDeBuzier View Post
        Thank you for this very interesting series on Australian santalum album Mr. Jordan.

        Reading my way through, I could not help but notice the similarities between the plight of Sandalwood - Santalum album out of the mysore area of India and Agarwood/Oud - Aquilaria malaccensis out of India and southeast Asia.

        Would you know (and be able to share) whether TFS has entertained the cultivation/inoculation of agarwood/oud for commercial harvesting in anyway similar to its efforts with Santalum Album in Australia?

        Mr DuNezDeBuzier, a good comparison. I have just written a draft of a 14 part Oud series covering the plight, plantations and outputs from this wood. I like your question but I cannot answer it. I will though when I have an answer. As far as I know Aquilaria trees do not grow in Australia. Maybe no one has tried? Or maybe further research will reveal 7600 hectares ready for harvesting next year after successful inoculation some years ago? There are successful plantations of Agarwood but there are far more unsuccessful ones due to the inconsistent results from the inoculation process. You can cultivate the trees in pretty rows but they do not all produce the resin that is Oud. Back on topic: you are in the draw. Simplex Sigillum Veri to you.
      1. Jordan88888888's Avatar
        Jordan88888888 -
        Quote Originally Posted by Switch245 View Post
        I found it very interesting that Germany was the principle buyer of raw mysore sandalwood in the 1900s. Not the first country that would come to mind! The series was concise and nicely written; well done Jordan.

        Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk
        Well Switch245 that was very interesting but why why why did Germany buy buy buy? Maybe you or another Basenoter can answer this question as my research was limited to English, Sanskrit, Pali, Hindi, Bahasa Melayu and Mandarin. Least you think I am showing off; Google Translate is a dear friend of mine. You have a very clever phone that has put you straight into the draw using Tapatalk!
      1. Jordan88888888's Avatar
        Jordan88888888 -
        Quote Originally Posted by daid View Post
        This is great and very educative series of articles. There are many interesting facts I've learned. The most important part for me is the one about the smell, part 7. I'm very happy to read positive opinions of those who have a huge experience with perfumes (Clayton, Portia, Suzanne). As the situation with Mysore sandalwood in India is rather bad, it sounds optimistic to have such a great alternative enriched with the virtues of Australian ground ("...a note of the Australian bush in it – but just a hint"-Suzanne R Banks, "...a fresh version of the Mysore, still rich and lavish but different."- Portia.) It would be interesting to make the same perfume with Mysore and Santalum Album just to see the particular differences. I think that there are perfumers who have already done this experiment in their laboratories. All in all, it seems encouraging.
        Someone will be making that (cannot say who just yet but the person is quoted in the series but had to do so incognito) and I can't wait to smell the results. The big difference will be the aging at the moment as this 'young' oil's scent profile will deepen and widen with time. Daid you are in the draw.
      1. Hackensack's Avatar
        Hackensack -
        So many of the natural elements that make perfumery great have taken a beating, I'm very encouraged that someone had the foresight (and business sense) to work on establishing a sustainable source for albam sandalwood. Now, if we can just be sure nobody reports an allergy so that IRFA bans the stuff..............Great set of articles!

        --oakmoss fan
      1. Jordan88888888's Avatar
        Jordan88888888 -
        Quote Originally Posted by Hackensack View Post
        So many of the natural elements that make perfumery great have taken a beating, I'm very encouraged that someone had the foresight (and business sense) to work on establishing a sustainable source for albam sandalwood. Now, if we can just be sure nobody reports an allergy so that IRFA bans the stuff..............Great set of articles!

        --oakmoss fan
        Hackensack I hope you are not a prophet! The conspiracy theory is that all naturals will be eventually be banned by the said body so perfumers have to buy from the aromachemical companies in a Monsanto-seed-type scenerio. I do not subscribe to this theory but it is interesting to follow the multitude of opinions. However I know of no deaths or handicaps from let us say, oakmoss! And it is not like perfumers use Deadly Nightshade in their 'fumes. A great cautionary comment though from you, thank you. Let's put you in the draw. Done.
      1. yukiej's Avatar
        yukiej -
        I love sandalwood, but I didn't know anything about how sandalwood is harvested, so this series was very interesting and educational for me. I was especially struck by how incredibly low yielding the whole process is (2-3%???). I would love to compare the different kinds of sandalwood oil side by side some day.
      1. annamadeit's Avatar
        annamadeit -
        Fascinating reporting, Jordan. Ever since you told me about the new Australian sandalwood, I've wanted to know more, so this was great! I have a couple of thoughts:

        I wonder what is done to the soil after a harvest. Is it left fallow for a while or...? Being that it is a mono-culture, I imagine certain nutrients need replenishing. (For comparison, the lyptus plantations of Brazil are said to drain the soil of nutrients.) Is there a companion plant that can be grown together with the trees to replenish as they go?

        Also, I was astounded to see the variation in trunk shape (based on the cross section of the logs. I imagine it is quite a craft to be able to use a machine of that size and power to reveal the heartwood without damaging too much of it. Those white ants probably took a lot longer, but I can see why that would have worked.

        I love the fact that the oil is traceable back to its growing location. I wish we did better with the tropical woods we get from other countries. Sadly, there seem to be some notable holes in that supply chain. Not to mention the added confusion with renaming woods into trade names and brand names.

        Finally - I always love a good legend! This was a great read. Thanks so much for taking the time and effort to put it all together into such a comprehensive presentation. Love it!
      1. Jordan88888888's Avatar
        Jordan88888888 -
        Quote Originally Posted by yukiej View Post
        I love sandalwood, but I didn't know anything about how sandalwood is harvested, so this series was very interesting and educational for me. I was especially struck by how incredibly low yielding the whole process is (2-3%???). I would love to compare the different kinds of sandalwood oil side by side some day.
        3.7% oil yield for this crop Yukiej, which includes the oil from the roots and stump as well as the tree above the ground. Yes, the % was new to me too. I hope you can try the differences on each wrist and one way to have a chance to do so is to pop your good name into the draw. Done.
      1. Jordan88888888's Avatar
        Jordan88888888 -
        Quote Originally Posted by annamadeit View Post
        Fascinating reporting, Jordan. Ever since you told me about the new Australian sandalwood, I've wanted to know more, so this was great! I have a couple of thoughts:

        I wonder what is done to the soil after a harvest. Is it left fallow for a while or...? Being that it is a mono-culture, I imagine certain nutrients need replenishing. (For comparison, the lyptus plantations of Brazil are said to drain the soil of nutrients.) Is there a companion plant that can be grown together with the trees to replenish as they go?

        Also, I was astounded to see the variation in trunk shape (based on the cross section of the logs. I imagine it is quite a craft to be able to use a machine of that size and power to reveal the heartwood without damaging too much of it. Those white ants probably took a lot longer, but I can see why that would have worked.

        I love the fact that the oil is traceable back to its growing location. I wish we did better with the tropical woods we get from other countries. Sadly, there seem to be some notable holes in that supply chain. Not to mention the added confusion with renaming woods into trade names and brand names.

        Finally - I always love a good legend! This was a great read. Thanks so much for taking the time and effort to put it all together into such a comprehensive presentation. Love it!
        Anna, thank you. I know you to have a strong ecological conscience and a love for trees. I have never met a tree that I did not like. I will not pretend to know the answers to your pertinent questions. I will however report back here after some further investigation with the answers as I like to know everything too! As the Santalum album is a hemi-parasite it requires 3 host plants to survive. Maybe these host trees regenerate into the soil before the next planting? Ha, now I already know that you will want to know the names of the 3 host plants! OK, I will rustle them up for you and others who may be interested.
        Before I continue this research I will plant your good name into the green hat for this draw.
      1. annamadeit's Avatar
        annamadeit -
        Haha - yes! I am dreadfully predictable... I would love to know the names of those host plants. What a fascinating symbiosis - no wonder the oil is precious!
      1. gimmegreen's Avatar
        gimmegreen -
        Annamadeit has already voiced part of what I was going to say.
        I am beyond pleased that a sustainable source of good quality sandalwood is being cultivated.
        But I, too, must raise questions of wider sustainability.
        There is usually little that is ecologically sustainable about plantation monocultures, especially over large tracts of land. Ecological diversity is certainly lost - not just of the flora of that region. However, I'm sure a tree plantation is better than, say, cutting down rainforest to plant GM soy.
        Nonetheless monocultures tend to be green deserts. And what about pesticide use? It would be interesting to hear TFS's views on such issues.
        Then there is the question of social sustainability. Is the work generated benefitting the local population or does it rely on staff who have been brought in from outside? Is it displacing traditional livelihoods? Does the company try to maximize employment or is the bottom line the only thing that matters - ie greater use of machinery to minimize numbers employed?
        Maybe these are unfair questions but they belong in the larger picture of sustainability.
        I'm not sure my post qualifies for the draw - but no matter. I have greatly enjoyed reading the articles.
      1. JDBIII's Avatar
        JDBIII -
        Thank you for this fascinating series of articles. It certainly is inspiring to see sustainable practices used in the service of fragrance materials. I'm curious to know if there are any other surprises from other companies around the world who are trying to keep natural fragrance materials viable in an ever changing marketplace.
      1. Jordan88888888's Avatar
        Jordan88888888 -
        Quote Originally Posted by gimmegreen View Post
        Annamadeit has already voiced part of what I was going to say.
        I am beyond pleased that a sustainable source of good quality sandalwood is being cultivated.
        But I, too, must raise questions of wider sustainability.
        There is usually little that is ecologically sustainable about plantation monocultures, especially over large tracts of land. Ecological diversity is certainly lost - not just of the flora of that region. However, I'm sure a tree plantation is better than, say, cutting down rainforest to plant GM soy.
        Nonetheless monocultures tend to be green deserts. And what about pesticide use? It would be interesting to hear TFS's views on such issues.
        Then there is the question of social sustainability. Is the work generated benefitting the local population or does it rely on staff who have been brought in from outside? Is it displacing traditional livelihoods? Does the company try to maximize employment or is the bottom line the only thing that matters - ie greater use of machinery to minimize numbers employed?
        Maybe these are unfair questions but they belong in the larger picture of sustainability.
        I'm not sure my post qualifies for the draw - but no matter. I have greatly enjoyed reading the articles.
        Gimmegreen, firstly, questions about any commercial entity are never unfair. I can report that not only are our Aboriginal sisters and brothers employed on this project but that TFS also sponsors soccer teams from these same communities. I think that TFS, based on the scale of the project is certainly increasing livelihoods in the growing regions. Pesticides; I do not know but I am happy to investigate and then report the findings back to you here.

        Sure you are in the draw based on your second sentence.
      1. Jordan88888888's Avatar
        Jordan88888888 -
        Quote Originally Posted by JDBIII View Post
        Thank you for this fascinating series of articles. It certainly is inspiring to see sustainable practices used in the service of fragrance materials. I'm curious to know if there are any other surprises from other companies around the world who are trying to keep natural fragrance materials viable in an ever changing marketplace.
        If you come across a surprise from other companies JDB111 please let me know. At the moment I am investigating the Agarwood situation as it is in the red zone of Critically Endangered which is a mere two steps away from extinct. A similar situation exists to what was the sandalwood situation. In this case organic plantations have been planted across Thailand, Indonesia, Cambodia and Viet Nam. The issue is the inoculation process which induces the Oud resin.

        These plantations have not all become successful. If this interests you my prelimary investigations (I have to say that the next link includes a reliable source in my opinion in case you think this is promotion) are in the article called The End of Oud.

        There is some good news though; you are in the draw.
      1. annamadeit's Avatar
        annamadeit -
        Oops - I think I posted a reply in the wrong place... so sorry! It has been removed.