Reviews by gimmegreen

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    gimmegreen
    Netherlands Netherlands

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    Les Déserts d'Orient - Encens Mythique d'Orient by Guerlain

    I just don’t get this one – I keep wanting to say, ‘But the emperor has no clothes!’
    Various people have praised its subtlety, creamy animalism (the ambergris), aldehydic airiness. Well, it ticks those boxes alright – but what is the quality of the perfume we are considering?
    To me, it’s a hot clothes iron landing on something that’s been treated with a rose-scented fabric conditioner. It’s an odd, morphed scent, crackling with static and artificiality, with the patchouli-dipped rose coming across like a scented eraser or a hardboiled sweet.
    What incense there is in here is so stingy, it’s lost in the sandalwoody notes.
    Admittedly the trail of this is more sophisticated than what one smells up close – fine powdery woods and a relaxed booziness that are not evident on the skin.
    All in all, this reads to me like attar-lite, and I don’t like it. Improves after a few hours, but then it’s a version of the familiar dry sandalwood meets syrupy rose theme that can be found for a fraction of the price from Arabic brands.

    15th March, 2015

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    Journey Woman by Amouage

    One gets the feeling that Amouage were aiming for the cool, shaded, limpid feel of their earlier Reflection Woman with this offering. However, Journey Woman is somewhat lacking in that indefinable just-rightness that characterizes good perfume and joins the middle ranks instead.
    The honey-osmanthus pairing has been making quite a few appearances recently – Journey’s interpretation is less cloying and syrupy than some and the apricot notes are a plus in lifting the opening, and giving it a lip-smacking tartness. When the jasmine emerges from the heart, it’s a watery one – the aim was probably for something light, gracious and cool, but it comes across as Amouage skimping on its budget. The leather accent is similarly banal and synthetic and does the whole no favours – the creators probably leaning too quickly on the tried and tested (in this instance the sympathy between osmanthus and leather tones).
    Journey Woman is no stinker, but it fails to scale any heights. The best thing about it for me is its juicy apricotty fruitiness which it holds through its evolution.

    15th March, 2015

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    Eau de Shah Jahan by Maison Nicholas De Barry

    A purist wood and rose combo with a finish like a refined skin cream, this will not surprise anyone familiar with the rose-oud legion. Eau de Shah Jahan is well-balanced and solidly traditional; sandalwood’s meditative quality much more in evidence than the delirium of oud, and matched with sweet, open roses (the kind that accompany rituals in India).
    It’s a good enough example of this pleasing genre, but nowhere near the front of the (increasingly lengthy) queue.

    15th March, 2015

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    Chamade pour Homme by Guerlain

    Certain fragrances exert a siren call upon me as spring rounds the bend – Guerlain’s Chamade, Tauer’s Zeta and Sisley’s Eau de Campagne. Chamade pour Homme has recently joined those ranks, a perfume that infused my being with a desire to grab a bottle the moment I sniffed it. I held out for half a year, but each subsequent encounter just confirmed this as a must have.
    Chamade pour Homme’s main premise is bold and straightforward – an upfront, garden fresh hyacinth note juxtaposed against a classy (and classic) barbershop ensemble. But my goodness, it works some magic; it is such a confident and invigorating scent, confirming Jean-Paul Guerlain’s genius at creating floral prominent perfumes that fit easily within traditional ‘masculines’.
    I suspect noses more attuned to the barbershop aspects may not find anything all that special about Chamade pour Homme as they will hone in on the fairly traditional violet leaf, pepper and clean vetiver backing, with a generous dose of foliage greens. But it’s that hyacinth – heady, unctuous and yet dewy fresh – that’s the sparkling gem set against this backdrop that lifts CpH to the ranks of the extraordinary, the difference between crystal and glass.
    Spray generously and luxuriate.

    15th March, 2015

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    Agarwoud by Heeley

    Agarwoud fits right in with Heeley’s mainly minimalistic ethos – it’s a linear, acetone oud, quite stylized and buffed. The realization of the oud note is in the vein of MFK attempts – vaporous, clean, unashamedly synthetic. The same can be said of the rose here – which seems airbrushed to the point of unreality (a la Tocade). It brings an angular art deco sensibility to its approach to these natural elements which is surely the intention: to produce something sheer, beyond nature, almost conceptual. There is a touch of something woodsy like a sweetened sandalwood in the background which seems to be the only concession to the real.
    The linearity can get to be a bore in something so streamlined, and I’ll admit I wouldn’t want to wear it often. But I find this enjoyable in infrequent doses.

    15th March, 2015

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    1904 Madame Butterfly by Histoires de Parfums

    Iris displays a cool kind of loving, taking your hand in her suede-gloved ones, talking low but kindly, maintaining a slight detachment and distance that makes you want to get closer. 1904 (not 1905, as stated here and elsewhere) Madame Butterfly possesses some of the refined longing of the opera, and has the creamiest, butteriest tone expressed by iris in a long time, somewhat nostalgic, caught in a reverie of yesteryear maybe, but oh so compelling. It is resolutely not powdery; it’s a soft, foamy, cream that would make anyone feel they have the grace of a swan.
    All the other notes fall away – the sad heliotrope is a sympathetic touch, the woods are wayyyy back in the distance – this is the song of the iris.
    It’s a shame such a lovely, understated perfume has been so hobbled by the pretensions and ridiculous pricing of HdP’s Opera project. Particularly when the magic only lasts for a few hours – the deep drydown is overwhelmed by clean musks.

    15th March, 2015

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    parfums*PARFUMS Series 1 Leaves: Calamus by Comme des Garçons

    A most appealing simple scent – Calamus smells of the pith of something pale green and succulent, like cut aloe vera or a marsh reed. It’s soft as a whisper, it’s gorgeous and comforting, and has baby milk on its breath as well as the lightest of green herbals. The angelica in the notes list has the starring role but in such a fuzzy, airy manner, it merges into the languid chord this creation strikes and holds for its duration. Calamus seems to be the scent of a world at peace with itself, a version of green nature that is entirely without thorns, calm and reassuring.
    Just the thing for a hot day, just the thing to wear at home and be untroubled. Its big problem is just how sheer it is; many will complain that it is too soft. But conversely, a more forceful presentation would likely have robbed it of its gentle character.

    06th February, 2015

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    Calandre by Paco Rabanne

    Whereas certain aldehydic perfumes seem to be forever looking to the future regardless of when they were created, Calandre, in my opinion, is one of the unfortunates firmly rooted in the past. It’s like an exploding vintage powder compact at the start, the kind of perfume one imagines has sat on someone’s dressing table since the 1960s, used once in a while, aging rather than maturing.
    This is perhaps unfair, as there is actually quite a punchy, if somewhat syrupy, floral with grown up green accents behind that veil of powdery aldehydes which comes increasingly into focus. The rose is central, supported by fat, heady jasmine and lily of the valley. This strong floral bouquet is mediated by some soapiness in the background which injects air into the creation and a sharp and mossy, somewhat bitter green note which cuts the concentrated sweetness. But it’s difficult to shrug off the air of old make up which is Calandre’s opening statement.

    06th February, 2015

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    Phi - Une Rose de Kandahar by Tauer

    PHI is utter indulgence, from the plump, succulent apricot at the start (an amazing slightly tart note which ought to be used more) to the drier, bittersweet almond and tonka aftertaste, and an almost ethereal rose at its heart. It’s novel yet comforting and so easy to wear, the novelty being in the sheer quality and the realization of some of the notes rather than avant garde posturing.
    Slowly darker shades of tobacco and patchouli are revealed, grounding the rose and gourmand notes, as are Tauer’s smooth almost gauzy vanilla, and a buzz of musk. PHI moves from gourmand heaven to lipstick rose over the course of the wear; it’s complex but has a clarity of expression that appeals from the start.
    The rose behaves curiously – smelt from the bottle stopper this is a divinely liquerish rose perfume, however on skin the fruit and tonka are more full on and the rose is but one player among many. I think the world could do with another iteration of this perfume with that heart-stopping rose much more prominent. But until then, what we have is a little stroke of magic nonetheless.

    06th February, 2015

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    Masha by Tola

    If one looks at Masha’s listed notes one could form the misguided impression that this is an ‘everything but the kitchen sink’ kind of perfume. Not so – Masha has a well-defined personality and confidence about it; it seems touched by the kind of grandeur usually reserved for the better Amouages, without, sadly, sharing their impeccable projection.
    Playing around a plummy, fruity, central theme is a strong and lively cast of herbal (lovely, bitter green artemisia), cedary, resinous, spicy, rock salt and dried-urine-and-sweat notes. Even coffee, a note that usually makes me screw up my nose, is beautifully integrated here – powdery and salty. The whole is pungent and bracing, dry without being brittle, opulent but not overdone, and such a pleasure to wear that I found myself rueing its price tag.
    Masha offers a kick a bit like an umeboshi plum – tart, uncompromising, bursting with flavour, but carrying a memory of sweetness that makes the mouth unpucker and take another little bite.
    The saltiness recedes in the late drydown, which is like the imagined meeting – on friendly terms – of Feminite du Bois with Dia Man.

    06th February, 2015

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    Almond Cucumber by Shay & Blue

    An impulse summer buy that I left boxed for weeks, fearing I’d made a ghastly mistake. What had grabbed me in the shop was the cool and true just-sliced cucumber – why hadn’t anyone thought of it before? Who would want to smell like that? (Me! Me!) But having bought a small bottle, I lost my bottle a bit – what if this devolved into a synthetic mess that screamed ‘Cheapo aquatic!’?
    The main surprise when I finally opened my box and wore it was how the cucumber interacted with the sweeter notes to give a suggestion of melon. It kind of weaves in and out, registering as a lovely, fresh cucumber, and then going into white melon mode before nodding towards the cucumber again. The almond is at first a touch of bitterness at the back of the throat, but is then pretty quiet and channelled in a floral direction, which seems like a missed opportunity. Eventually this fragrance turns into a transparent floral with cucumber on its breath and an odd thyme-like accent that, depending upon one’s mood, somehow works or is jarring as hell.
    It’s weird, it’s a bit simple, it evokes water but in an almost jellied kind of way, it would probably work better as a soap. Toning down the sweetness would have helped enormously, making a starker, bolder statement.
    What got to me eventually were the headachy aquatics coupled with impressive persistence – unbearable after a few hours. Still, this is a decently constructed composition, but one I’d rather catch a passing whiff of than wear myself.

    06th February, 2015

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    Nepal Aoud by Montale

    It’s no good when a perfume chirps ‘cheap, cheap’ from the off. Why does Nepal Aoud do this? – maybe it’s the sinus cleaning quality of the oud reconstruction used here (reminiscent of fuel fumes) encased in the kind of syrupy fruity notes that bring to mind a hard-boiled sweet. There’s also a case of ‘all musked up with nowhere to go’ happening with a vapour trail of musks emanating from the wearer.
    Maybe it’s the amber accord that can often go wrong and make funny faces. But the whole is a highly artificial, sloppy mess of scratch-and-sniff quality. Does come round a bit after 8 hours or so, when what’s left is mainly a solvent-oud that has a certain glue-sniffing appeal.

    29th January, 2015

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    La Fin du Monde by Etat Libre d'Orange

    The end of the world is a soothing dream, something to be embraced in ELDO’s creed, if this offering is anything to go by. Iris prominent perfumes can display a certain alien hauteur – vegetal, rooty, flinty, not offering the easy recognition of a floral or a citrus note. One feels one is meant to display an intellectual appreciation rather than the instinctual and emotional response usually triggered by scent.
    The iris in La Fin du Monde smells like how one would imagine pale pink milk to taste – smooth, sweetened delicately, comforting but with an undertow that evades complete identification. It is paired beautifully with the skin musk qualities of ambrette, given a little sympathetic support from carrot seed. There are also gentle woody tones and a hint of something a bit metal-in-the-mouth, but these are minor actors to the central iris-ambrette pairing. Safe, and giving the appearance of simplicity, but also deeply reassuring and rewarding, a trusted friend in perfume form.

    29th January, 2015

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    Incense Extrême by Tauer

    Supremely salty and bone dry incense and woods combo – this is where Fate Man picked up his edge, though he’s a far cuddlier character. The aura of Incense Extreme is contrarily soft seeing that the scent itself is quite martial in its directness: these are woods that have been petrified in a salt desert since the start of time, the incense has a high pickled lemon and dried sweat pitch, there’s not a trace of anything sweet when approached up close. Incense Extreme is bright, diffusive, with that surprising softness hovering over something that is essentially razor sharp. A joy in cold weather.

    29th January, 2015

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    Monocle Scent One: Hinoki by Comme des Garçons

    A brief phrase held for ever – that’s how some of the Comme des Garcon’s range (particularly those involving incense) come across to me. Hinoki has a promising start of camphoraceous pine and incense, the camphor providing a twist to the outdoorsy green woods and incense theme. However within a short space of time, the elements gel and we are left with a flatlining scent, a sweet, somewhat monochromatic incense with the pine and fir notes soaked into it like food colouring. In many ways the scent is reminiscent of the later Memoir Man, but whereas the much richer Amouage breathes and has a great tonal range, Hinoki is even and unvarying to the point of tedium.

    29th January, 2015

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    Gulbadan by Tola

    A pig farm of an opening – damp rotting hay with excrement trodden in. Anyone uninterested in perfumes will wonder who would be willing to endure such a pong in the hope of getting to better things. One can immediately sense the floral and ‘fresh’ notes battling to get through. To one’s relief the stink dissipates quite quickly but the heart phase isn’t particularly thrilling: a mixed floral in the ‘Arabic’ vein but without the lushness and depth of the best. The fruit notes are generic and lightweight, the florals are all jumbled up and underpinned by the remnants of that stinky dampness, but with some airy citruses keeping the mix light.
    It’s when the perfume settles properly, at least an hour in, that it comes into its own. Now it’s an abstract floral, a bit like old school French creations, with the main difference being a discreet woody and oudy base. Dhaher Bin Dhaher, the man behind Tola, has stated his aim was not to create an Arabic line of perfumes but to meet the West mid-way, something Western perfumers have increasingly been doing in the opposite direction for a while now.
    Gulbadan is persistent but mild and fluffy and, if you’ve lasted this far, quite a comforting wear. But the evolution continues and the base reveals how rich and sweet it is after several hours; now we are definitely in attar territory and it all gets a bit OTT again.
    Well worth a try but I find Tola’s extravagant pricing a mismatch with what’s on offer here.

    29th January, 2015

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    Aoud Ever by Montale

    An easygoing oud by Montale where an uncomplicated idea executed right results in a perfume that lifts the spirits and scares no horses. That idea is the coupling of juicy, zesty lemon and lime with a much quieter oud than we are accustomed to from this house. The quality of the citrus here is key: it isn’t fluorescent and screechy, it’s pretty close to nature, yet displaying the sophistication of citrusy classics from the 1960s and 70s. Though it inevitably changes and sweetens over the course of the day, it doesn’t turn harshly chemical as often happens. A sprinkle of pepper bridges the citrus notes with the wood, and the whole thing emerges fully realized and unforced, ready to face the working week rather than just the special occasion.
    Projection is somewhat humble after the first hour or so.

    29th January, 2015

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    Un Air D'Arabie Oud by Maison Dorin

    Oh my rotting wine casks! This is the best hit of oud I’ve had in a while – damp and sodden at the start and then dry as sawdust, stinky, feral, with depth, turbulence and armpits, and woody as can be. Dorin reveals just roses and oud as the notes but one can almost cross out the roses as they are so transformed – these are roses chewed up by the oud and then farted out.
    The way in which some ouds seem to go right to the frontal lobe is as close to a drugs rush as this clean-living reviewer will ever come, and this offering is right up there with the best of them. Downright sleazy round the edges but gaining over time a femme fatale air of sweetness and spice. Utterly Arabic, as I have smelled similar perfumes on many Arab women. And undeservedly unnoticed here on Basenotes.

    29th January, 2015

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    The Lion Cupboard by 4160 Tuesdays

    A different twist on a fougere, mainly due to the huge dose of anise that is married here with lavender. This pairing is the central theme of this characterful perfume. At first it is washed over by a wave of furniture polish, which when it recedes is succeeded by flashes of all kinds of interesting things – fresh mint, soft floral sweetness, hints of tobacco – while all the way the anise and lavender remain front of stage singing their song of love. As a result this cupboard has bags of air to it – and the aura left in a room is beautiful, better in fact than what I smelled off my skin.
    Grows sweeter and more diffuse with the wear, yet without losing too much of its individuality. The woody notes were pretty subdued for me, as also the cocoa which I would have loved to have had a greater puff off. It didn’t completely win me over, but enough for me to realize that there’s a skilful hand at work here and I should try out other 4160 Tuesday perfumes. However, as a perfume with personality and a light touch I can see it immediately clicking with some who will adopt it as ‘their’ perfume.

    29th January, 2015

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    Idole Eau de Parfum by Lubin

    Olivia Giacobetti is one of the few perfumers who can effortlessly convince me to go around smelling like a pudding – she did it with Safran Troublant, and here she does it again. Partly it is to do with the lightness and sureness of her touch – these confections don’t feel cloying and heavy; partly it’s the subtlety of her approach. Idole has a core of elusiveness that keeps my nostrils awake.
    Orange, rum, sugar cane (that slightly fermented sweetness that’s at the edges of this creation) and the candied vanilla tones of labdanum, combine to create something quite indulgent and boozy, but handled ever so deftly. Wild cards like cumin and sharp, dry, woody notes are incorporated skilfully – they’re there, but just, giving body to the overall creation without distracting from its lusciousness. The woods do emerge more with time but in a progression that’s measured, without losing the boozy sweetness that’s the identity of this perfume.
    If there’s a miss-step here it’s in the foot firmly planted in the amber camp, which gives Idole EDP a density and even obviousness it really doesn’t need. I need to track down the EDT which from all accounts has greater transparency.

    15th January, 2015

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    Wonderwood by Comme des Garçons

    This one is so comfortable it’s the tracksuit bottom of woody fragrances; therein its main virtue (so supple, easy and everyday) and its main drawback (too easy and everyday).
    Wonderwood is a peppery cedar with a high clear frankincense that wears light and fresh despite the evident spicing. Many CdG perfumes take an approach with natural notes that is akin to airbrushing – the note is recognizable but it is lifted and smoothed and buffed to the point that somehow takes it out of nature.
    I have a soft spot for woody perfumes, but this one left me wanting due to its uberpolished execution; which perhaps also explains the reviews that go, ‘I don’t normally like woody perfumes, but this one did it for me’. The whole is brought together with finesse, it just fails to excite me. A shame as the name is so evocative and enticing.
    Oud is mentioned in the notes list but is so apologetic it seems hardly worth mentioning.

    15th January, 2015

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    Truly by Maria Lux

    A pitch-shifted jasmine with synthetic-seeming fruity and ambery accents and a little candyfloss. There’s also a sourish note in the mix which could be an aldehyde as it is quite smooth and soapy, but without the expected effervescence. The one point of interest is a clove-like note in the shadows with a green almost basil aspect which may have given this perfume more personality had it been boosted. Apart from that Truly is pretty ordinary, neither truly awful (it’s quite easy to wear), nor truly exceptional.

    15th January, 2015

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    White Aoud by Montale

    After a hospital ward opening, White Aoud settles into a gentler, somewhat powdery iteration of the Montale oud theme with some decent sandalwood for support and a touch of soapy cardamom. Smooth, easy to wear and contemplative, despite a disconcerting whiff of detergent powder around the edges from time to time. The late stage is similar to that of Montale’s Attar.

    15th January, 2015

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    Mohur by Neela Vermeire

    Silky soft like an angelic caress. Scrap the note list which may lead you to expect some indigestible over-spiced and over-rich concoction – you couldn’t be further from the truth. Imagine a deep, soft, taif style rose interpreted in a velvety style that feels like a second skin and mellowed further by cardamom-infused milk and powdery accents and you’re getting there. ‘Do no harm’ seems to be Mohur’s motto; it’s gentle, it’s comforting, its battery of butcher elements whispering in a huddle in another room. The evolution is towards a deeply satisfying soapy creaminess, with the rose much receded.
    It lingers gently through the day and is my go to perfume for noisy evenings with drink involved – its quiet unwavering voice offers the still centre I crave on such occasions.

    15th January, 2015

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    Iris Nazarena by Aedes de Venustas

    A beautiful thing beautifully framed – the most sumptuous iris and leather combo that ever caressed my skin. The leather has a suede aspect to it, but before jaded perfumephiles go ‘Ho hum, yet another suede’, I’ll hasten to add that it smells not just soft, but new and clean and milky. Add to that the wonderful creamy, carroty iris, handled with care not to tip the perfume into some rootsy statement territory. My mental image is of an iris superbly crafted in grey suede, resting on plush velvet, subtly backlit with lively, twinkling, scented jewels.
    There’s a lot going on unobtrusively behind the iris-suede romance – there’s ambrette reminiscent of skin which ties a love knot between the couple, touches of lip stick and make up, dashes of an almost green vetiver, warmth from rose and clove. This impossible suede flower lives and breathes.
    Bewitches for about 4 hours, after which the life seems to depart and we’re left with something considerably flatter.

    15th January, 2015

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    Intense Pepper by Montale

    Lives up to its name in the opening, where hyperreal just-crushed pink and black peppers release their fragrant oils in an invigorating burst. But goes rapidly downhill from that promising start, first with an odd old-paper-and-swimming-pool-bleach backing and then by the emergence and dominance of a cheapo lemon note that creeps from the fringes to offend centre-stage. It may just be how the elements are drying down/morphing that evokes this weird lemon as it doesn’t feature in the brief notes information on the Montale website.
    There’s vaguely woody stuff going on in the background that pushes this firmly into a certain kind of designer fragrance marketed at men category (citrus-pepper-wood), but in a bargain basement iteration. There’s little to redeem this synthetic whiteout apart from that fleeting opening.

    15th January, 2015

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    Akaba by Antonio Visconti

    Akaba is one of the more successful examples of this house’s style which tends towards the dense and unwashed, classical in composition but sometimes just plain weird to the nose. Most I am quite happy to keep at arm’s length; Akaba I’ll gladly allow to get a bit closer.
    The characteristic density is here as well; the opening reads like licorice-accented toffee with a hefty dose of sweaty salt. But given time, the perfume opens up – though not an awful lot – to reveal an unusual harmony of fudgy tones balanced with woods and herbs. The fudge side is represented by a gooey blend of tobacco, patchouli, tonka and vanilla, almost too rich a confection. But it is sliced through by the salt and dry woods – artemisia, sharp cedar, petrified sandal. Pinning these two aspects together is what I consider to be the central note of this perfume, the salty, sweet and rooty licorice, a wonderful extract used here far removed from the headache-inducing variants found in drugstore ‘masculines’. The result is a perfume a bit like an olive – many will never acquire the taste, while others won’t know when to stop.

    15th January, 2015

    rating


    Woody Intense by Arabian Oud

    A first sniff led to a ‘I must have one of those’ moments in the shop – this perfume seemed like the synthesis of the warm, inviting, refined perfumes I have encountered in passing on people from the Middle East, archetypal almost.
    Woody Intense is in essence a sweet wood accord borne aloft by billowing clouds of synthetics (clean musks included), which makes the deeper wood notes fresh and light but also highly diffusive. On closer inspection, the oud reconstruction is pretty thin, the musk smells like hairspray, the saffron is a cousin many times removed. It’s like one of those Stock, Aitken and Waterman pop hits from the 1980s with the treble maxed out to hook the broadest spectrum of listeners, but fortunately nowhere near as annoying. For, truth be told, cheap and tacky it may be in the heart phase, but it still gives me a lift.
    The surprise is a few hours in, when suddenly I am reminded of that all-seasons lavender and oud charmer – Xerjoff’s Fars.

    18th December, 2014

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    Nuit De Longchamp by Lubin

    Nuit de Longchamp in its latest incarnation remains a lovely traditional mixed floral (y’know jasmine, ylang, rose – the usual suspects) with an oakmoss accent laid on a base of powders and resins. It’s a composition the nose recognizes immediately as vintage; perfumes these days eschew in the main such complexity and subtlety. Of course, the danger is that Nuit de Longchamp won’t strike you as particularly original – the ghosts of many a Caron seem to haunt this territory. And perhaps it will also suffer due to its politeness, when compared to the more assertive creations in this category. No doubt, that will be a recommendation for others who were searching for something a bit lower key but with the requisite persistence. Ultimately, while this is a fine enough offering, it doesn’t stand out enough from other perfumes in this style.

    18th December, 2014

    rating


    Aoud Musk by Montale

    Woohoo this is so turbo, one could knock oneself senseless with a spray too many. It’s the Kaa of Montale ouds, going ‘Trust in meee, jussst in meee...’; it could swallow you whole.
    But, hey, live a little dangerously and you’ll have quite a ride.
    The first hurrah is a volley of air freshener musks paired with quite a sweet yet peaty oud, it has an almost choking humidity about it, like true wood rot. This rests on a haystack of intense synthetic saffron, which bears some slight resemblance to the natural product but can’t quite achieve its warmth or bitter-sweet sophistication. The combination is utterly chemical but also hypnotic and disorientating.
    Musk Aoud is loud and brash, and yet it works. Maybe not quite as well as some of my favourite Montales, but it’s well worth a visit if, for you, excess is a thrill.

    18th December, 2014

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