Reviews by Colin Maillard

    Showing 1 to 30 of 621.
    rating


    Cristalle Eau de Toilette by Chanel

    Cristalle opens with a delicate and slightly metallic herbal accord comprising several "organic" pungent and natural nuances (basil, mint, grassy notes), citrus notes, fresh and lively white flowers, dry resins, a really subtle vanilla-amber-woody base which provides a light, but at the same time elegant and Oriental warmth embracing the "freshness" of the scent. Honestly initially the oak moss is not that perceivable in my opinion, after a while the only thing I could link to it is a vague greenish-mossy note, humid and slightly dark, but without all the stale earthiness of oak moss. However I was surely not expecting a Puig's Quorum in drag, so no big deal. The name Cristalle perfectly fits this scent, which in fact has a "cristalline" personality, where crystal means transparency, freshness, angular cleanliness, almost an abstract architecture. Clean, understated and geometrical, elegant but somehow a bit anonym and pale (not in a good way: imagine the smell of a "faded" scent), plus with a really short longevity. Interesting, but nothing amazing to me.

    7/10

    26 August, 2014

    rating


    Roma by Laura Biagiotti

    The initial notes of Roma are quite on the sweet-creamy side; ylang, vanilla, a hint of fruits, a balsamic-resinous breeze (myrrh, apparently: basically an Oriental spicy-incense-resin smell like olibanum), a minty note, heliotrope, delicate and aromatic citrus notes, aldehydes, supported by an earthy-animalic velvety base, refined and understated, which gives just a tiny touch of "animalic" à la Jicky but quite soft and hiding like a shadow behind a cloud of silky spicy soapiness. As minutes pass it darkens becoming smokier and more resinous, the balsamic incense is now more prominent together with woods and patchouli, always surrounded by a sweet talc creaminess of ylang, flowers and sandalwood. So in short it's all about flowers, resins, woods, quite on the sweet-bright side despite some interesting darker corners. Undoubtedly a pleasant scent, simple, friendly and elegant (not that sophisticated, though), versatile and iconic – you smelled this everywhere some fifteen years ago in the streets of Italy. The drydown is dry and unexpectedly more greenish, almost grassy and a tad metallic. It may sound weird, but given the similarity of the notes, it almost resembles to Zino Davidoff or Guerlain Héritage's "blond sister". Good and easy-going.

    7,5-8/10

    26 August, 2014

    rating


    Eau de Givenchy by Givenchy

    Eau de Givenchy is a nice, pleasant, relaxed chypre which brilliantly manages to combine a fresh, minty, summery breeze, almost "iodine" in a way, with a denser, darker and stickier base line of notes more typically found in classic chypres – the usual musky/animalic mossy base, not particularly earthy or heavy here, but still carrying that kind of slightly skanky-sweaty smell. In the middle, a bouquet of flowers ranging from carnation to rose, then sandalwood, patchouli, perhaps vetiver. Shortly a classic Oriental chypre on the mossy-woody side with a remarkable fresh twist – halfway mineral and fruity, azure and refreshing, played not on calone but rather on a combination of balsamic, floral, fruity notes which delivers a colourful, fresh breath, slightly aqueous too. Totally refined, a kind of "weekend" relaxed elegance. Perfect elegant drydown (which despite the name "Eau de...", is quite long-lasting). A good one for sure!

    8/10

    26 August, 2014

    rating


    Casmir by Chopard

    Casmir opens with a bag of fruits on sandalwood, vanilla, ylang, Oriental flavours of spices and cinnamon. Briefly, a sweet and creamy fruity bath soap, which however is restrained and complex enough to smell better than most of other scent of this genre. Despite smelling a bit like Fructis shampoo, in fact, Casmir reveals some more structured and intriguing nuances and a compelling deepness of notes: it's plummy, sweet and creamy, but in a sophisticated, mellow, decently-executed and polite way (in other words, it is no sickening teenagers' gourmand and does not smell too much artificial). Not a masterpiece for me, but in that disgraceful family – the "fruity-floral bombs" – surely among the nicest I've ever tried.

    6,5/10

    24 August, 2014

    rating


    Chamade by Guerlain

    Chamade (vintage mid-'80s bottle here) is a dark, powerful herbal chypre opening with a foggy, grey, masculine austerity all over: a bouquet of herbs, humid flowers, musky notes, a powdery side, a dry leather base. But most of all, herbs, like in a man's fougère. The reference here seems to be halfway classic chypres à la Guerlain or the (unfairly underrated) great Guy Laroche, and Cabochard or Habanita, that family of "bitchy", skanky feminine scents, although more refined and adorned here by a beautiful, impalpable cloud of lively, radiant, graceful hyacint-soapy talc notes which are not "on skin" but you can clearly smell them in the sillage (an "effect" I totally love). Basically a classic structure which recalls echoes of memorable chypres, with flowers, woods, herbs and resins, just fairly darker, greener, bitter, more ambiguously sensual and nastier, especially for the first hour or so, almost like a chypre for gentlemen if it wasn't for an overall subtle but perceivably soapy-talc softness and a dark, carnal but feminine sensuality running underneath the blend (aldehydes, flowers, vanilla, musky notes). Classy and compelling like "the great ones", perhaps a little less original as to me it smells pretty much a "déjà-vu" to most extents, but surely worth a try if you are a fan of the genre.

    7,5-8/10

    24 August, 2014

    rating


    L'Arte di Gucci by Gucci

    L'Arte di Gucci is a remarkable forgotten classic, a robust aldehydes-floral scent with carnation, geranium, benzoin, white flowers, sandalwood and vanilla, a dense juiciness and a luminous, pleasant and refined subtle carnality. Initially it's all – deceptively - about brightness, flowers and spring liveliness, rich and dense but tending more towards a soapy-powdery kind of denseness. After less than a hour, though, it then starts to evolve and change; a dark and austere base accord arises slowly like a stormy cloud, a powdery-waxy leather with salty and earthy notes of vetiver, discreet and understated but shady and animalic. The transition is great, perfectly executed; it's still a rich, romantic floral scent, just with a bolder darker shade below. I've rarely experienced such a smooth, mellow, effortless and refined change of mood in a scent, with the right among of consistence and "fil rouge" of notes from one stage to another. Rich, sophisticated, terrifically good-smelling.

    8,5-9/10

    24 August, 2014

    rating


    Vendetta by Valentino

    Vendetta opens with a beautiful blend of juicy, plummy fruity-floral notes, dense and bright, with pleasant aromatic hints of bergamot and green notes on a soapy base of ylang, sandalwood, vanilla, a lively cloud of luminous sweetness and gentle flowers brilliantly blended with a shady, sticky and carnal side of benzoin and leather – initially hiding behind this deceptive overall sweet fruity-floral "plushiness". A balsamic-herbal breeze completes the landscape. A classic architecture embellished with a golden, luminous and radiant brightness which then progressively darkens towards a more austere and refined chypre territory. Simple, romantic, solid and classy.

    8/10

    24 August, 2014

    rating


    Gian Marco Venturi Uomo by Gian Marco Venturi

    Gian Marco Venturi Uomo is a traditional herbaceous fougère which exudes late-Eighties from all its pores (although I suspect it's more likely from the '90s judging by the amount of synthetics). Carnation, aldehydes, light leather, herbs, oak moss, perhaps tobacco too, a subtle balsamic-menthol breeze which refreshes and gives a bolder green feel to the blend, on a mossy woody base, slightly camphoraceous too. As much classic as dull, to be honest: it's anonym, a bit outdated, quite artificial/metallic and overall fairly cheap, perfectly reflecting the market positioning of brand (I don't know about how they are placed abroad, but in Italy it is one of the typical brands you find in the "cheap gift sets" section of supermarkets and street markets around Christmas).

    5,5-6/10

    23 August, 2014

    rating


    Gincense by Oliver & Co.

    A pungent, green and balsamic incense scent, quite close to Sugi by Comme des Garçons except for the incense – which however is not that prominent in Gincense - or a less mystical and more "organic" Kyoto by the same house. It also has a quite strong insecticide feel (I guess due to a remarkable dose of citronellol) but is nice the same if you try not to think about that. The green notes are fresh and vibrant, with a load of pepper and a pungent hint of what seems juniper to me, all quite dynamic and realistic. Not the most original around, but pleasant enough, and probably good against insects too. For something similar but (far) more interesting, mature, sophisticated, go Comme des Garçons.

    5,5-6/10

    22 August, 2014

    rating


    Vanille Absolu by Montale

    As the name suggests quite clearly, Vanille Absolu is, well, absolutely about vanilla. Powerful, round and sweet, with a slight citrus-bergamot breeze at the very opening, a smell of (generic) rose all over, on a dark and dry woody base which I guess may contain a tiny hint of what the guys at Montale's insist on calling oud. Dull and overwhelmingly artificial, with some kind of slight denatured alcohol feel, but I believe the average fan of such type of scents (either "Montale scents", or "vanilla bombs") won't really care. Not far from other low-quality vanilla gourmands like Comptoir Sud, while far from some slightly better and more interesting ones like a couple from Farmacia SS Annunziata. In short, don't bother.

    5,5/10

    22 August, 2014

    rating


    Caprissimo by Carthusia

    A sumptuous floral scent full of itself which tries to look like a"golden era" Caron or Guerlain, acting all opulent and feminine, while it's basically a dull chypre stuffed with synthetics and aldehydes good for rich and tasteless tourists visiting Capri. The quality in my opinion is really modest, artificial to all extents (synthetic oak moss, synthetic flowers). Not horrible, although the opening is humid, heavy and strong as hell; but a bit cheap and much pretentious.

    5/10

    22 August, 2014

    rating


    Black Musk by Montale

    A moderately and modestly austere, dark and dusty opening, with oud, a subtle musky-skanky feel on the very base, some vanillin (a sort of really light, almost unperceivable, diffused, soft cloud of sweet talc), and a leather note surrounded by warm amber (ambroxan) and nutty-almondy notes. Shortly a sort of dry, dusty amber-dark scent à la Montale, where the dark means a synthetic and plain blend of oud-like notes, leather and musks. Not a disaster, especially for being a Montale, but surely nothing special: despite it may appear interesting and "threatening" it's actually fairly light, dull, plain, artificial - not "scary" at all and quite uninspired. Needless to say it smells like a dozen of other Montale's.

    5,5/10

    21st August, 2014

    rating


    Armani Privé Eau de Jade by Giorgio Armani

    Eau de Jade opens with a strong and textured citrus accord (aromatic, aristocratic, fresh and sweet, with notes like neroli and bergamot), pepper which at first smelled like juniper to me, and a darker base which comprises a range of nuances spacing from mossy-hay notes, to licorice and leather - a modern, satin, soft kind of leather. Despite being quite conventional, it is really pleasant, complex and powerful, with an enjoyable, vibrant richness all over. It kind of reminded me of Eau de Gloire by Parfum d'Empire, less earthy, less raw and less chypre, and more zesty and sophisticated, but somehow the "mood" is that one – citrus notes on a mossy-musky base. Not the most natural around, but too much organic naturality won't be "glossy" enough for this type of Western elitist concept of luxury, so it works the same – it's classy, perhaps pretentious, but nice. The evolution is quite close to zero, meaning that more than evolving it just becomes lighter, softer, more velvety and warmer, losing (obviously) in freshness and liveliness.

    7,5/10

    21st August, 2014

    rating


    Fougères Marines by Montale

    A horrible ozonic scent straight from the '90s with greenish synthetic stuff underneath, so cheap even supermarkets won't accept it.

    3/10

    21st August, 2014

    rating


    Noir Patchouli by Histoires de Parfums

    A nice velvety black patchouli scent, not much realistic or deep, and with a discreet rubbery feel all over, kind of terpenic and industrial, which on one side tones down the vibrant earthiness of patchouli, and on the other side transfigures it into a more abstract, sticky and oily note, in a sort of futuristic interpretation of such ingredient. Still, with a bold connection with the past: aldehydes, carnation, rose, leather and herbs create a notable feel of masculine chypre like it was common in the '70s and '80s, just less dense and complex, less powerful, with a more satin, modern personality (trendy, in short). A skanky vibe on the very base, although a bit pale and glossy. Less offensive, dark and "daring" than it may appear, and also quality-wise far more modest than lots of vintage chypres. In short, another niche scent which "acts" and "pretends" more than actually is and does... not bad, but if you're into this type of scents, just cross the door of vintage realm – plenty of better fragrances on the same chords (needless to say, at cheaper prices).

    6,5-7/10

    19 August, 2014 (Last Edited: 21st August, 2014)

    rating


    Jaïpur Homme by Boucheron

    With all the "artistic perfumery" expensive niche scents that I test every week, it's been a while the only surprises that still amaze and wow me regularly come from inexpensive, solid cheapos. Jaipur Homme is another example of this. I wore it quite a lot of times recently to make sure it was really that good as I thought almost instantly after the very first application: it is, indeed. Jaipur Homme is a magnificent, insanely refined scent, which really moves the boundaries of class and sophisticacy. Unique, elegant, addictive. Basically, it's a soft and radiant cloud of Oriental soapiness with sweet vanilla-almond hints, shades of talc, a lively and light bergamot/citrus accord at the very opening, and a beautiful heliotrope breeze providing a breath of nature, pollen, of spring warmth. The soapiness is not the "usual", synthetic soapiness many scents provide; it's true, foamy, opulent and rich soap, cozy and warm as a bath tub in winter time. Clean, rich, dandy, powdery and luscious, with a slight tobacco aftertaste. There's cleanliness and innocence, but view it from another perspective, and it's pure decadent dandiness, deceptively "white" and clean. A refined and relaxed marvel, perhaps too sweet for someone: to me it's one of the most sophisticated male perfumes ever made, which finally moves outside the usual territories of "austere virile masculinity". Boucheron and Annick Menardo did a great job in thinking other new ways to portrait modern masculine elegance – luminous and feminine, but also shady and eccentric. It quickly became my favourite "home fragrance" (which is the highest reward a fragrance can get from me). A must try for niche fans which identify quality with elitism and high prices.

    9/10

    19 August, 2014

    rating


    Chinatown by Bond No. 9

    Chinatown: sweet, silky vanilla roundness with hints of tonka and cardamom, a warm, almost caramelised resinous thickness, amber, and a white bright floral accord (ylang, peony and that type of flowers). Citrus notes on the aromatic/sweet side – like neroli and bergamot. Sandalwood on the base providing a "bold" support, but in line with the general sweetness, carrying its signature sweet-woody creaminess. In short, Chinatown is a gourmand on the amber-floral side suspended into a vanilla cloud, not cloying but rather pleasant, even if not that original nor particularly interesting. I guess gourmand lovers may love this one – for me it's only a bit more than decent, and surely better than dozens of others of this genre.

    6,5/10

    18 August, 2014

    rating


    Majalis by Les Parfums de Rosine

    Majalis by Parfums de Rosine opens with a green, fresh rose note wrapped in a spicy blend, overall a bit artificial, quite pungent and medicinal; at the very beginning it's in fact all about cinnamon, eugenol (cloves) and a poor sheer rose note hiding somewhere in this vibrant circus of spices, surrounded by a dusty and metallic feel. More than Far East, it reminds me of a (nicely scented) floor cleaner. Then, after a bit less than one hour, it finally starts to get better: sweeter, softer, gentler, more credible, a colourful rose breeze blossoms blending with cinnamon and red pepper, always with a synthetic aftertaste, but far more pleasant than the opening. The rose note is finally triumphant on the rest, and I must admit it's quite nice: dense, fresh, mellow and sweet. Great persistence – almost an entire day. There's better rose scents around and the opening is really not that promising, but if you are willing to wait for it to get warmer and better, Majalis may make you happy.

    6,5-7/10

    18 August, 2014

    rating


    Louban by Montale

    Louban opens with sandalwood, vetiver, a shady and dry floral note which may be a generic synthetic rose, then also violet and a base accord of patchouli and resins (I read olibanum but it smells a bit darker and thicker to me, almost like benzoin). Shortly a sort of woody-green chypre, with a dry and camphoraceuos undertone, also with a metallic-soapy feel witnessing again the average-to-low quality of Montale ingredients. Not bad per se, but if you are familiar with '70s and '80s chypres à la Guy Laroche, this smells like a pale, poor and uninspired rip-off of those – probably not on purpose, as I doubt both Mancera and his customers care about (or even barely known) that heritage, but it does a bit. The difference is only the synthetic oud note, by the way quite light, and a general "contemporary" lightness, which I'd consider more lack of depth and substance. Finally it quickly evolves on a clean, soapy drydown with synthetic nuances (from salty to rubbery, I guess due to the oud note). Not horrible, but dull.

    5,5-6/10

    18 August, 2014

    rating


    Embruns d'Essaouira by Montale

    A horrendous calone-menthol scent halfway a random 1990's ozonic fragrance and Colgate toothpaste, on a synthetic, metallic and slightly salty woody base with the same supermarket quality of the calone note. Had to scratch it off earlier than expected (yes, it's *that* bad), so I can't judge about the persistence, but I do hope it's short.

    3/10

    18 August, 2014

    rating


    Opus 1870 by Penhaligon's

    A nice fragrant thingy without praise or blame, basically a cedar-incense (pencil sharpener) with gentle floral notes, notably rose, with a light, silky and warm fruity feel, and a pepper note giving the right amount of, well, pepper (meaning "dynamism"). The notes smell honestly more ordinary than it may seem reading the pompous names listed above – it's a decent, a bit dull blend of cedar, flowers, pepper, citrus, in short a unisex classic cologne with a bolder wood accord. Despite it is really nothing special, it is still a nice, refined, bright scent, lively like a mid-spring afternoon in London, also with a slight and pleasant "barbershop" vein running all over – some classic, dandy, delicate and shady mood, mixed with a sheer, urban sort of transparency. Sophisticated soapy drydown. Nothing exceptional, but nice.

    6,5-7/10

    18 August, 2014

    rating


    Sun by Jil Sander

    Sun (in its early version), as the name suggests, opens with a radiant, luminous floral accord on a slightly milky base, soft and white like a mid-April plushy cloud. A dense and complex texture from which it is hard to distinguish the notes: it's a lively harmony played on the nuances of white, really nice and well executed. On the head, citrus and neroli, that kind of zesty but silky citrus-floral note; a mellow, fresh floral bouquet in the middle, creamy but light and bright, then a few spices (perhaps nutmeg and tonka), all gently posed on a balmy, sweet woody base. All around, a coloured spring breeze of pollen, heliotrope, rose, ylang... and that's it, all about liveliness, beauty and light, with a slight vanilla-almondy aftertaste which reminds me of beach lotions. Light and happy, but not shallow and not even delicate, instead as I said it's a remarkably complex and dense scent, which just manages to smell perfectly "simple". After a while it progressively becomes less luminous and more resinous, brownish, earthier, with an Oriental vanilla-tonka powdery touch which reminds me of Boucheron's Jaipur Homme. Well done!

    8/10

    17 August, 2014

    rating


    Calamity J by Juliette Has a Gun

    The opening of Calamity J is modestly pleasant, not particularly deep or interesting but nice: iris, suede, amber, vanilla, a few cocoa beans, with a light floral breeze and perhaps a discreet woody undertone, which may be a vetiver note given a certain amount of salinity on the very base (which may be however simply due to the massive ratio of synthetics used here). Sweet but not sweetish, soft and cozy, effortlessly mellow and elegant. Desperately shallow and artificial though, but classy enough for a suburban dinner out. Like alfarom correctly notes, all this (which is not anyway particularly amazing) kind of vanishes and collapses sooner than expected, and you remain with a really basic and light amber-vanilla accord, clean and pale, nice but a bit boring after a while. In my opinion, a bright idea followed by a clumsy and poor execution.

    6/10

    17 August, 2014

    rating


    Les Nombres d'Or - Ambre by Mona di Orio

    Ambre by Mona di Orio opens with a solid, sumptuous, soapy and powdery accord of amber, slightly boozy and almondy too, perhaps due to the presence of tonka and benzoin. The family here is the "majestic" and refined amber scents à la Ambre Precieux, with more talcum, an old-fashioned touch of aldehydes, and the booziness of Ambre Russe by Parfum d'Empire. Plus - and this would not be the first time Mona di Orio does that - the almondy-powdery-waxy-aldehydes feel sounds a bit like an attempt to insert a "tribute" to the baroque classic heritage of fragrances à la L'Heure Bleue. The drydown is gentle, soft and soapy, slightly alcoholic (not boozy now, more like floor cleaning alcohol), but pleasant, graceful and elegant. In short, Mona di Orio's Ambre is a nice nostalgic scent, refined and elegantly outdated, not the most original around and probably unworthy the excessive price (come on, an amber scent shall never be that expensive).

    7/10

    16 August, 2014

    rating


    Chocolate Greedy by Montale

    With such a name, you already guess what to expect, and if you're fond of sweet gourmands you'll be surely not disappointed by this one. Opening the bottle (or the sample, as in my case) of Chocolate Greedy is like opening a bag of chocolate candies. Nutty and almondy nuances, a vanilla feel, and this huge, synthetic prominent accord of pure chocolate – not "cocoa" beans, nothing dusty or earthy, rather a round, rich, silky and slightly creamy sweetness of chocolate. Dusty, softer and vanilla-almondy drydown. That's pretty much it, not bad if you are into this type of scents. Me? I hardly consider gourmands "fragrances", except for a few excellent outsiders (this isn't one).

    6,5/10

    16 August, 2014

    rating


    Triomphe by Rancé 1795

    Another son of the Almighty Pencil Sharpener cult! First let me point out that in my opinion, the composition listed above and elsewhere on the net does not look correct - at least not entirely. What I smell is a bold, sharp and (synthetically) crisp cedar note supported by a light and sweet olibanum breeze, blended with something sugary and a clean, slightly waxy iris/violet (synthetic) accord on a soft and mellow base of cozy and balmy woods. All sweetened by a peculiar, and fairly nice sort of sugary feel with a hint of licorice or anise. Imagine a pencil in a vase of flowers next to a glass jar of licorice wood sticks, that's Triomphe. A bit plain and lacking in "substance", and also fairly close to cheaper scents like Carbone by Balmain with a floral-sweet twist, but nice enough.

    6,5-7/10

    15 August, 2014

    rating


    Moon Aoud by Montale

    Moon Aoud opens with an averagely decent synthetic oud note this time accompanied by a soapy-sweet-spicy variation. A floral breeze and a hint of vanilla clumsily juxtaposed to the dry, indolic and rubbery personality of oud. Plus, it soon comes in prominently also an odd, and frankly almost disturbing spicy-gourmand note of saffron with sweet, slightly almondy nuances – now place this next to the fecal-rubbery-industrial feel of oud and the totally unrelated soapy-clean accord and you get the psychedelic and fairly stinky nonsense which is Moon Aoud for its first hour. Soon after (another of Montale's signature features), half of the notes vanish and you get the exact same drydown of basically any Montale's oud – a synthetic, dark, rubbery-woody note which lasts for hours. Not a complete disaster but in my opinion dull and useless.

    5/10

    15 August, 2014

    rating


    Lagerfeld Classic by Lagerfeld

    Yet another underrated (in my perception) scent from the '70s. The classic Lagerfeld opens as a sort of slightly aldehydated chypre with a classic structure (carnation, orris, oak moss, rose) supported by a whole and quite modern side of velvety, soft, mysterious and smoky side exuding (masculine) austerity and powdery exotism with tobacco, amber, powder, a musky base note and a sweetish sort of vanilla-candied-almond accord. A peculiar scent indeed, starting like a musky chypre then vanishing into a resinous-tobacco cloud, landing on a velvety Oriental carpet of ambers and powder, not far from scents like Fumerie Turque, although with a higher rate of classic notes like oak moss, and with denser and bolder resins and powder. I do not know the recent versions, but the vintage one (still easy to find especially in Germany) is surely remarkable.

    8/10

    15 August, 2014

    rating


    Lautunno by O'Driù

    Lautunno opens with a stout, pungent, indolic and dusty harmony of humid herbs, hay, patchouli, a gloomy, wet and heavy floral accord and something like civet, delivering a morbid stale-fecal smell which is quite bold at the beginning – to me, bold to the point of being quite challenging. When it tones down, which luckily occurs quite quickly, the scent turns towards a more gentle herbal-spicy feel, still quite vibrant and heavy, with cumin and cloves, plus dry herbs, conveying O'Driù's signature "medicinal" smell. As minutes pass the scent becomes increasingly pleasant and mellow, a smoke cloud comes in together with a refined palette of tobacco-aniseed nuances dynamised by spice and a whole sort of gourmand side - not sweet, rather herbal-spicy. The overall vibe is in fact autumnal (the name means "The Autumn" in Italian): there is this vivid feel of dust, brown-orange colours (spices, hay, herbs), humid dead leaves, melancholy, a romantic mystery. The opening is harsh and honestly, unpleasant to me, but what an evolution. Soft, refined, versatile, with several nuances in common with the famous and recent Peety an Eva Kant, most of all a silky sweet note, an usual sort of watery-mineral feel underneath, and a tobacco-animalic base note. The humid and salty feel evolves finally on a peculiar sort of greenish, lacustrine drydown, like the humid smell you feel in a lazy fall Sunday on a lake, still with a herbal breeze and gentle sweet notes. Tenderly melancholic and evocative.

    8/10

    15 August, 2014

    rating


    Hascish Homme by Veejaga

    Hascish is a great, ultramodern scent, which perfectly mixes the coniferous freshness of eucaliptol and pine (finally not a heavy, resinous and sticky pine accord, rather a light, breezy note, invigorating like a walk in the Alps) with a smoky, dry resinous olibanum-woody accord – mostly comprising vetiver and cedar. Initially the freshness is balsamic, energizing, scented with a light carnation note, then it warms up turning on a woody-incense accord, realistic and resinous, with dry woods and a mossy-balmy undertone (you clearly get both the oak moss and the leather at this stage, although both subtle and understated, only providing a dark and thin cushion to the main accords). All still wrapped in a green-herbal bag of pine cones and salty vetiver branches, with also something sweet which I can not identify further but which delivers a peculiar, mellow, addicting feel which blends perfectly with the scent and surely gives a touch of "narcotic" hascish. Green and cold before, warmer and smokier on the end. The drydown is cozy and refined, still balsamic and woody, with a really subtle anisic-vanilla note all over. A great scent indeed, modern and versatile, elegant, friendly and perfect all year round thanks to its mix between balsamic freshness and warm smoky woodiness. I have tested this from an '80s bottle so I don't know how it smells today, but it is surely underrated!

    8,5/10

    14 August, 2014

    Showing 1 to 30 of 621.