Reviews by foetidus

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    foetidus
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    Osmanthus by Keiko Mecheri


    I wonder if Demeter is going to make an Osmanthus fragrance: I’m wanting to smell osmanthus again but I’m not having much luck with these fragrances named “Osmanthus.” In the osmanthus sense, Keiko Mecheri’s version is just so not right. The list of notes includes “datura” and “tuberose” but I don’t get any more of those than I get osmanthus. I get a fruity top that is somewhat tropical. I get a big stab of violet leaf green in the heart. There’s a drydown…?

    I really, really would like to smell the tuberose… or the datura,,, or especially the osmanthus.

    14th November, 2009

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    Eau Suave by Parfum d'Empire


    Eau Suave is not the type of fragrance that I appreciate, but, all things considered, it is impressive. It’s fresh, well balanced, has excellent longevity. It’s made of excellent quality materials, and is a bit edgy… a bit unusual with its touch of menthol… It’s a fruity / floral for a real grown-up. Its opening is cleanly aromatic with just a bit of spice – I even enjoy the saffron. I have to admit that I don’t smell the roses – there’s no rose note for me, but I do get the fruit, and I admire how pleasant the fruit notes are even though I don’t ordinarily care for fruit notes. The main aspect of the fragrance, though, is the aromatics: There’s a menthol-like note that is present from beginning to end. This aromatic note provides the clean, fresh feeling and tones done the sweetness of the fruit and, eventually, the vanilla. This is a refreshing, enjoyable feminine fragrance and the mythically connecting of this to Josephine is cute and charming.

    14th November, 2009

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    parfums*PARFUMS Series 7 Sweet: Nomad Tea by Comme des Garçons


    Quite a unique green note forms the opening: the mint and geranium give some extra punch to the green tea leaves, and it forms an accord that smells not only more than a little exotic, but also quite a bit synthetic… but it’s interesting and potentially enjoyable… This accord stays on for pretty much the run of the fragrance, and there doesn’t seem to be separate heart notes. The base is signified by the periodical wafts of the smoky woodnotes that finally add a certain depth and breadth to the unusual greenness of Nomad Tea. Nomad Tea is a tea scent but I don’t get enough “sweet” out of it to understand why it is in the “sweet” series. The sweet I do get seems combined with the smoke to give me a burnt sugar or caramel note. In all, it’s unusual but not impressive.


    14th November, 2009

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    Rose by Czech & Speake


    Not at all complicated, and charmingly unaffected… Czech and Speake’s Rose is a lovely feminine fragrance… as others have said, old-fashioned… simple… warm…

    Smelling it brings to mind the appearance of those flowery greeting cards from the Victorian times: Idyllic and pretty.

    I’m voting thumbs up because of the visual image of those greeting cards and the comforting innocence and loveliness of the fragrance.


    14th November, 2009

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    The One for Men by Dolce & Gabbana


    With a name like “The One,” I expect this to be the fragrance equivalent of Jet Li. It isn’t – it opens without inspiration… the citrus / herbal opening is a bit ordinary, slightly plastic, and quite discreet… but I sort of like it. The middle, too, is rather pleasant, perhaps because of its discretion, lightness, and balance. It, too, is slightly spicy but it adds a floral that the pyramid says is orange blossom… hard for me to tell. The base is a soft presentation of amber, tobacco, and musk – nicely done…

    The One is an okay scent. Its attractiveness is in its soft, balanced sillage, its well-thought-out construction, and almost adequate longevity. It’s too young for me but I would imagine that it’s a nice fragrance for a young man.

    14th November, 2009

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    parfums*PARFUMS Series 1 Leaves: Lily by Comme des Garçons


    I guess I’m joining the fan club here: This is a quiet and lovely lily of the valley scent… remarkable for it’s simplicity. It opens green – too green, but it doesn’t stay in greenness very long. It softly takes on the lily of the valley note, supported by an unaccustomedly quiet freesia in the background giving just the perfect complementary vibrations. From there Lily simply lets its beauty slowly wane and dissolve.

    …A graceful feminine beauty with good sillage and longevity..

    14th November, 2009

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    Timberline by Dana


    This review is of the original MEM Timberline:
    I was quite surprised by the restrained, balanced, fresh feel of Timber Line when I first applied it: I was expecting something a little more blunt and odious and less refined. Timber Line is clean and refreshing – it opens with an herbal / lavender / citrus accord in which the only giveaway of its age is perhaps a little too much basil in the mixture. The middle level is signified by the disappearance of the basil and the soft rendition of a slightly floral, slightly spicy, geranium / coniferous accord. The middle level is proportioned and discreet. I don’t get much of a base at all – mostly musk and moss with a little sweetness: It’s a little too weak and short lasting for me, but it retains its pleasantness and discretion. Thumbs up for a decent ’68 fragrance and I just wasn’t expecting something as good as this.


    14th November, 2009

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    Sagamore by Lancôme


    There are two movements going on concurrently in the opening that make the opening quite an elegant and complex presentation: first the lavender / citrus combination which has been fairly typical of many fragrances; second, the nutmeg / sage combination whose juxtaposition with the lavender / citrus accord deeply enriches the total impact of the opening – it’s remarkably rich… and long lasting. The flow to the middle accord is so smooth that it’s hard pinpointing the transition. I know that I reach the middle accord when I realize I’m smelling florals – soft florals where the usual flowery emanations have been refined to a masculine floral texture. It’s sensual and elegant at the same time, and it, too, lasts. The base is a multi-noted accord typical of the times, but done even better than most. It is a well-refined amber, wood, musk and styrax accord… balanced, masculine, and as rich as the accords in the previous levels of the fragrance.

    Sagamore is beautiful. It is one of the most tasteful and elegant of the deep, rich, woody masculine amber Orientals of its time. It is soft enough for it to be easily be worn today if applied lightly: A great one from the past that works in the present.

    14th November, 2009

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    Maxims pour Homme by Maxims


    While I don’t find the leather in Maxims pour Homme dislikeable (in fact, I enjoy it… just as I often enjoy mild leather notes in the older fragrances), the leather dominates my sense of smell over many of the other notes and accords of the fragrance. I can tell four minutes into the opening that this is about all this I am going to get from this fragrance: leather and the indoles from the heart jasmine. To me this is an extremely animalic fragrance. I don’t at all get any fruit note of any sort in the opening: I get a smooth, deep leather and a rather strong indole note from the jasmine… And “sweet”?… in no way does anything smell sweet. The leather and indoles override everything to my nose. No other florals than jasmine from the heart either. Occasionally throughout the long run of Maxims, I think that I can smell a bit of patchouli, then cedar, then amber… but they are gone so fast, I’m not sure I smelled them. I get no moss or musk. This is a linear leather fragrance with a strong jasmine indole note. I like it and I don’t say that often about a leather fragrance. Although I do enjoy it, eventually its linearity becomes more uninteresting than anything else. The age of my sample might also have something to do with the reduction of top and middle notes… Hard to tell…


    14th November, 2009

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    Gucci pour Homme (original) by Gucci


    Oh, yes… This one’s NICE! It immediately reminds me of Equipage, but this one has leather and a richer, fuller depth to its accords. The opening is a quiet lavender combined bergamot. But it has more of an almost leather depth to it – leather from the base, perhaps. I could sniff it for hours and the opening actually tries to oblige me with its longevity. I get mainly wood in the middle – cedar and sandalwood, judging from the era it was created, but the middle accord is too well blended to pick out very many individual notes – with the wood I detect a tiny bit of powder, and I’m sure the accord has jasmine in it, even though I can’t separate it out from the rest. The Base? Well, it’s the typical multi-noted base of the ‘70s, only done with more subtlety and refinement than most: Moss, leather, and a little bit of soft resin I can’t identify are what I can identify from the published pyramid basenotes. Gucci Pour Homme is the original Equipage (not the screechier current one) plus leather. Gucci’s accords are smoother and more sonorous – but similar. The added presence of leather and other smooth, deep richnesses provide a truly masculine, incredibly beautiful fragrance. Definitely one of the great ones…

    14th November, 2009

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    Grès pour Homme by Grès


    Grès Pour Homme is an enjoyable citrus fragrance well presented in a ‘60s style. It is a complex citrus scent… the kind that we don’t see too often lately. Its complexity reminds me somewhat of the three Signoriccis by Nina Ricci because of the petitgrain in the opening. The petitgrain is unmistakable. The lavender in the opening also adds a feeling that makes the citrus accord broader than the typical citrus accord. The middle level is complex and primarily woody to my nose with its cedar, patchouli and with its touch of rosewood: This accord is very smoothly blended. Finally, the ‘60s are also represented in the base accord, with its long list of base elements. This blending, too, is smooth and seamless and keeps me from identifying most of the individual notes, although it seems more musky to me than anything else.

    I’m not sure I would wear a scent like this anymore, but I do admire its character and I have enjoyed the trip down memory lane.


    14th November, 2009

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    By Man by Dolce & Gabbana


    Not your usual opening: pepper and a green nutmeg given a weird sort of buzz by hediones pretending to be jasmine… and yet it’s an enjoyable accord. Coming off the top notes to the heart notes, the lavender rather than the artemisia dominates the middle of the fragrance, which I find unfortunate. I was looking forward to the aromatic woodiness of artemisia and hoping it would overwhelm the lavender there… it didn’t. No wormwood, just lavender. I am forced to dismiss the middle accord. The base comes across weakly to me. I pick up leather and amber, and I might like it if I could smell it better… I can’t tell if the weakness is my problem or the fragance’s. I don’t get enough wood in the base to be sure that it’s there. In spite of my description, I think I will give this fragrance a bit of a break… It’s a skin scent that doesn’t happen to do anything for me, but I can recognize that it performs its skin-scent attributes quite well.


    14th November, 2009

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    Aqua Allegoria Winter Delice by Guerlain


    This is bright and shiny… morning sun rays bouncing off crystallized snow. The coniferous notes: fir, and pine are cool and invitingly clean and the whole opening sparkles with the light aromatics of cone trees. The tenor of the fragrance is light from top to bottom – even the incense is such a light, translucent note that it does not weigh Aqua Allegoria down one bit. The base’s soft wood and gingerbread note fit in very appropriately with the conifers and incense to form a delightfully smelling winter fragrance that removes itself completely from being the cliché it could easily have been.

    14th November, 2009

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    Rose Absolue by Annick Goutal


    Rose, rose, rose, and rose: If you don’t love rose, don’t bother… If you love rose, Annick Goutal Rose Absolue presents the rose in the most elegant simplicity possible. It is totally beautiful and I love smelling this on women.

    Quite delicate sillage but presents itself firmly when smelled close to the skin. Lasts forever…

    14th November, 2009

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    Dark Rose by Czech & Speake


    This responds on my skin as a lighter, more wearable Black Aoud, and that is a very good thing to my way of thinking. I like Black Aoud, but it is too strong in both rose and aoud for my taste. With most oudh scents, 90% of what I smell is oudh. With Dark Rose, the aromatic / oudh / saffron / rose opening has a definite edge to it that I find pleasant and surprisingly wearable. It is a refined and elegant opening with enough oudh to provide a strong interest, but not so much as to overwhelm... I am easily overwhelmed by oudh, but I have gotten habituated enough to it to enjoy this lesser level. I find this reduced level (plus some other wood notes) at a perfect intensity: it is interesting enough and I experience it as a comfortable and enjoyable wear.

    I especially enjoy the reduced strength of the rose as compared to Black Aoud. Rose is a note I am not in love with as a fragrance... I find it rather suffocating. The softer rose note in Dark Rose is especially a plus for me.

    Dark Rose is linear and I like it that way. It is long lasting, and it presents a moderate, engaging sillage. I admire this scent because of its touch of the exotic, its subtlety in its presentation of strong notes, and its excellent performance. I'm sure this will be in my collection soon.

    01st November, 2009 (Last Edited: 09th October, 2011)

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    Le Temps d'Une Fête by Nicolaï


    The first notes that I smell from Le Temps D’Une Fête are a strongly animalic green, and those notes hold for quite a long time – they are rich, unique, and viscerally rewarding. When the animalic notes finally subside, the heart notes provide a luscious green note – galbanum – coupled with the light, delicate notes of the spring flowers. It is such a creatively unusual progression and destination, and it is a typical genius performance of a Patricia de Nicolaï fragrance… The gentle lightness of the spring bulbs is a brilliant counterpoint to the rich, full, and earthy green accord, and both stand in comparative balance following the dense animalic overtones of the opening. Le Temps D’Une Fête has good sillage in the beginning that softens to a skin scent by the time the base is accomplished. It manages finesse and sensuality at once and has good longevity… a totally excellent fragrance.

    01st November, 2009

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    Davidoff Adventure by Davidoff


    I’ve nothing new to report. I’m in agreement with the majority of the reviews: Davidoff Adventure is generic, but pleasant; it is much too weak; it boasts poor sillage and incredibly poor longevity. I agree with Rcav that it is similar to the older Burberry London, but this one doesn’t bother me at all and the original BL does. Mate, pepper, a somewhat metallic vetiver, and white musk all watered down – that’s about it…

    Not much of an adventure, is it?

    01st November, 2009

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    Osmanthus by Ormonde Jayne


    The osmanthus is a remarkable flower. It is about a one-centimeter wide trumpet shaped white flower that grows on the dark green (usually trimmed) bushes -- often trimmed to become hedges. These hedges are planted abundantly in the parks, around the temples, and other planted areas in East Asian cities and countryside. The flowers are tiny but their scent output is huge. It’s near unbelievable how these tiny flowers can produce such massive scent. When the hedges are in full bloom, the wonderful odors permeate entire neighborhoods of the cities.

    I was so looking forward to smelling osmanthus again since it’s been months since I was there walking among the hedges. I guess I have to keep waiting, because there’s not very much osmanthus in this Osmanthus; in fact, if I hadn’t seen the name, I never would have suspected it being here. This Osmanthus is a very nice, very safe woody / floral with some nice safe fruity notes to support the florals. The quality of materials used is excellent. The fragrance is nicely composed, but it lacks identity. It provides ambiance without direction. Its background aura reminds me more of other Ormande Jayne fragrances than it does of the wonderful aromas of osmanthus.

    01st November, 2009

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    Vetyver / Vétiver by Givenchy


    Very nice… The strong bergamot opening already has elements of coriander and vetiver in the background… together they come across as a somewhat unique aromatic introduction. I’m more ambivalent than anyway else about it. I think its oft-mentioned licorice tinge rather reduces my pleasure in this version of vetiver. Yet, in spite of my minor annoyance with the opening, I find it impossible to dislike the accord. Givenchy Vetiver is well put together and presents such a skilled professional performance, I find myself respecting it even though I don’t thoroughly enjoy it, so I'm voting a non-enthusiastic thumbs up... Low key, unexciting, and completely respectable... it’s an excellent scent for someone who is not me.

    01st November, 2009

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    Mimosa by Czech & Speake


    The florals themselves do not come through very clearly for me; so, instead of a dominant flowery tuberose and jasmine, I am left with a rather strong indole note. It smells dirty – it even crosses over the thin line between floral and fecal. Usually the presence of a fecal note is not a negative with me, but the problem here is that it doesn’t come and go as a fecal note usually does in a fragrance… it stays as a continuing note and it gets overmuch. Judging from the other reviews, I’m not the only one who reacts negatively to Mimosa, but I’m not quite as turned off by it as some of the others seem to be. My greater criticism of with Mimosa is that I find it quite characterless. It is well made; it performs competently and lasts long enough, but its only real uniqueness or point of interest is a droning, shallow, near off-putting fecal note.

    01st November, 2009

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    She Wood by Dsquared2

    Green, woody, and sappy… Quite a natural opening that is not at all feminine. It is more like the cut stems of fresh greens: It’s clean and refreshing, but certainly not light. Too much violet for me in the middle notes, but these violet notes don’t disgust me as violet notes usually do, so that’s sort of a plus for me. Of course, when there are violets present, I can’t smell the other notes – in this case heliotrope and musk – in the heart. Nice base: coniferous and woody with a touch of sweet amber, but the over-lasting of the violet note reduces the experience.

    I’m not too sure that this is a very original fragrance. It seems to me that I have experienced somewhat the same scent in several unisex fragrances – it just seems a little too familiar. I think it’s an acceptable quality fragrance, well made with good ingredients. I love the sappy ambiance of the opening… the rest of She Wood is not very interesting, but I think those who like violet notes could possibly enjoy this one.


    31st October, 2009 (Last Edited: 18th February, 2011)

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    Encens Flamboyant by Annick Goutal

    I love the aggression of the opening – it smells of burning charcoal and the resinousness of the tree gum. To my nose the incense does not come across as an incense made for fragrances, but as more as an environmental incense. I get a definite burning note along with incense, which reminds me of the way incense is burned in the Middle East where the frankincense powder is sprinkled on glowing, smoldering charcoal. I don’t get any spices that are supposed to be in it – the resinous incense dominates too strongly to my nose. The dry down is superb: woody and churchy resinous. Encens Flamboyant is quite linear which makes it a winner from start to finish… I love it.

    31st October, 2009

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    Myrrhe Ardente by Annick Goutal


    It took a while to let the beauty of this fragrance enter into my way of thinking… The myrrh in Myrrhe Ardente’s opening is smooth and refined – it’s not a raw, visceral myrrh smelled directly, it’s a atmospheric myrrh – one that suggests the miscellaneous use of myrrh in the environment, not the close-up personal, intentional use of the “bitter perfume.” Although thoroughly a myrrh fragrance, the gaïac wood and beeswax of the heart notes come through well… I don’t get any vetiver. The myrrh of the base gets more resinous and stays resinous because the benzoin and tonka present their sweetness lightly and discreetly. But still even this “resinous” version of myrrh remains tame. This is an absolutely beautiful fragrance and a must buy for me. It is discreet and mysterious and elemental. I love what is not there… its lack of florals and its lack of sweetness and even its lack of the more visceral (I usually love visceral) aspects of this ancient perfume of mankind. This is a “background” scent that gives me a perfect level of performance just as it is.

    31st October, 2009

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    Black Diamond by Canali


    Bergamot, tangerine, coriander, cardamom, nutmeg, apple, pineapple, melon, violet, jasmine, lily of the valley, orange blossom, neroli, teak wood, cedar, vetiver, sandalwood, peach, tonka bean and musk: Almost every note known to man in the opening to provide an opening accord that smells pretty much like almost everything else from the ‘90s...

    Whoops! Cross that out… it’s not from the ‘90s, it’s from 2007!

    Well, anyway, it is synthetic, citrusy, spicy, fruity, flowery, musky and woody – and that about covers all the options, doesn’t it? And I thought these conglomerate formulas went out in the ‘90s…

    But it’s ok… I see no reason to dislike it.

    31st October, 2009

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    Padparadscha by Satellite


    Notes: pepper, cedar, sandalwood, juniper, amber, musk

    A startling opening of cedar and pepper—very aromatic, very dramatic, and quite dry… The aromatic accords of the opening are unique; they are exotic and warm and yet, very quickly they all come well within the parameters of wearablity. They are coniferous-woody and pepper-spicy and they are presented with flair and passion. The fragrance, though, doesn’t have very much sillage—it stays close to the skin providing an exotic cedary / juniper ambiance but for too short of time. Even though the fragrance appears to be constantly morphing into woody variations, it never seems to reach much of a sandalwood presence, and its amber also holds back, leaving it quite dry even in the dry down. Its main characteristic is that of a beautiful, resinous cedar that reminds me a bit of Sequoia by CdG, but Padparadscha is more challenging and, after the initial burst, less aggressive. Padparadscha is a unique unisex woody / spicy fragrance that is refreshingly exotic, surprisingly wearable, but could use much more longevity. (Rewrite of 24 April 2007 review.)


    31st October, 2009

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    Ferré for Him by Gianfranco Ferré


    Ferré for Men seems to me to be a cheaper, more synthetic version of Dior Homme. The lipstick is prominent in the opening and it is immediately shadowed by an iris note in the background. There is a pineapple note in the mix, too, which is a small departure from DH. These notes do not come up to the quality of DH either in quality or the lasting ability of the notes. It gets a little floral in the heart notes – a mixed bouquet of smooth floral notes, and I think these florals are done quite nicely. The pyramid lists a lot of different notes for the drydown but I chiefly get a vetiver / oakmoss accord supported somewhat by tonka. Ferré for Men has a light sillage, a synthetic feel, and a nice development. It’s not greatly impressive, but it’s still a nice fragrance.

    31st October, 2009

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    F pour Homme by Salvatore Ferragamo


    Another fresh, clear, somewhat synthetic fragrance… It is extremely light but, even so, it exhibits warmth and character. I find it enjoyable until the leathery drydown, but even the “leather” is not offensive enough for me to condemn the fragrance. I smell very little of the pepper note, but I do get the warmth of it. F by Ferragamo is okay – its combined freshness and warmth is enjoyable and its synthetics are highly wearable. It doesn’t have much of a sillage but, surprisingly, its longevity is good… Nice movement from the opening through the leather-like basenotes. On a better day I might say a thumb’s up.

    31st October, 2009

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    Antico Caruso by Profumum


    This is not a very complex scent. I get a rustic herbal accord in the opening – rough, soapy, probably a little arrogant… I get no citrus. The herbs quickly move into an herbal / almond accord that is pleasant. As the herbal notes disappear, the almond note becomes stronger and sweeter. I find Antico Caruso turns out to be almost a simple solo note fragrance: Almond, simple but quite enjoyable. I suppose that if the quality of the note is good, it doesn’t matter that the composition is uncomplicated. The lack of complexity works for me. The drydown is a plain, somewhat sweet almond note with a background of subtle but rich sandalwood. Both the almond note and the sandalwood note are of high quality, and I’m struck and surprised by the elegance of everything happening in Antico Caruso. It reeks of class and good breeding. …very good sillage and longevity.

    31st October, 2009

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    Eau Parfumée au Thé Rouge by Bulgari


    Opens very differently from the other Bulgari tea scents: This one comes on strongly (for Bulgari) with a blatantly rustic black tea note – it has such a satisfyingly clean, near-visceral fermented tea character. As far as the pink pepper, Seville orange, or bergamot is concerned, they are either hidden in the black tea accord or they aren’t there… at any rate, I don’t get any citrus or pepper. The heart note tea is more settled… smoother… and I lose a little interest because it is turning out to be too much like other tea scents that I already own. Also there is a semi-fig character to the heart tea, and I don’t understand why, because I would prefer a tea note to the scent of fig. I don’t get a much of a drydown except for a nutty background note and a little musk that doesn’t seem to last very long. The drydown shows up very scant on my skin. Except for the tea note, I don't find much to love in this fragrance.

    31st October, 2009

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    Stardust for Men by Llewelyn


    It’s an unusual accord that opens this fragrance. I think the combination of lime, conifer, and nutmeg is responsible for the disagreements about the similarities to other fragrances. This lime / conifer / and nutmeg accord doesn’t remind me of anything in particular, but there are several miscellaneous forgettable fragrances I’ve tested and immediately disliked. GIT… maybe… Aramis New West… a bit more than GIT. It certainly doesn’t remind me of Cool Water because I actually like Cool Water and I do not like this one. I just don’t care for the lime, nutmeg, and conifer combination in Stardust… It doesn’t sit right with me. I like Stardust a tiny bit better when it moves well into the heart notes where the jasmine and patchouli come together for a smooth, light woody accord – unfortunately I still smell the echoes of the aggressive, almost annoying opening accord from the beginning through the base.

    31st October, 2009





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