Reviews by

    's avatar



    's avatar



    's avatar



    's avatar



    's avatar



    's avatar



    's avatar



    's avatar



    Showing 1 to 8 of 8.
    rating


    Jicky by Guerlain

    I tried the eau de parfum, and at first I suspected that the tester must have gone off. There was something in it-- what I now assume to be the civet-- that smelled so weird and, frankly, nasty.
    Those of you who enjoy screen-printing might liken the opening of Jicky to the smell of Diazo-brand emulsion removal fluid.
    But, once it dries down some, the civet runs away and Jicky starts to smell wonderful. It's warm yet fresh, conservative and yet sexy.

    I would love to wear it, but I'm not so sure that it can be passed off so well as a man's fragrance. Its citrus/wood/civet opening is ambiguous enough, but it is purely feminine when dry.
    I believe it is stupid for men to avoid women's perfume simply because they are labelled so, but Jicky offers little to a man. There's nothing terribly virile about it except for the civet, which is nearly undectable after less than an hour.

    13 September, 2008

    rating


    Habit Rouge by Guerlain

    Yes, it's French. Yes, it's 'a Guerlain.' Yes, it's quite expensive. It's also old and 'reputable.'

    But it smells like a heap of baby powder that a drunkard threw up in.

    13 September, 2008

    rating


    Fleur du Male by Jean Paul Gaultier

    I was given a sample of this one last year in a department store.

    I found it altogether pleasant. It smelled very clean and fresh, and, though it is also quite sweet, it was nothing I would call 'cloying.'
    It was unfortunately bland. It's a nice change from the run of the mill, and I think it is much better than 'Le Male,' which reminds me of black pepper and body odour, but it's nothing too special.

    The salesperson who gave me the sample (a bit of a shark in her approach, really) told me that "this is for someone who is brave," that wearing a floral scent is courageous for a man. I, however, think it's the opposite; bravery involves actually wearing a woman's scent. Buying a scent so obviously feminine because it is being sold as a man's cologne is, well, wimpy.

    So, if you like pretty flowers, you better just skip Fleur du Male and get yourself a real woman's floral. If you want to smell feminine whilst hiding behind the 'pour homme' label printed on the bottle, I suppose you should go for this.

    31st August, 2008

    rating


    Essential by Lacoste

    Nice stuff.
    I really can't say more. You know, sometimes it doesn't have to be complicated or dreadfully expensive to smell good. A little over-used, though.

    31st August, 2008

    rating


    Dirty English by Juicy Couture

    Sick and tired of the excessive lemony freshness of what everyone else my age is wearing these days (at least in Montreal), I've been on the prowl for a spicy and woody scent that doesn't make me smell like a sober, fifty-something year old accountant.

    I thought I had found that with Dirty English, being simultaneously youthful, sexy, and woody/spicy. I must say that, when I first decided to buy it, I loved it. It smelled woody and warm without a trace of the conservatism I was trying to avoid.
    However, after you wear it for a few days, you start to grow weary of it. It's spiciness is a little too tame, it's warm woodiness watered down by it's unnecessary citrus elements.
    It just leaves a lot to be desired.

    Plus, it has an air of adolescent obnoxiousness about it; it smells like Abercrombie and Fitch stores, to be frank.

    And I really don't want to smell like that.

    19 August, 2008

    rating


    L'Instant de Guerlain pour Homme by Guerlain

    I sampled it and loved it.

    Surprisingly, it seems to be composed of two entirely different fragrances. At first it is a nice, warm wood with a pronounced element of citrus. After an hour or so, it's basically a powdery chocolate cake.

    It is certainly one of the more youthful Guerlain fragrances (though Mouchoir, given the affinity for flamboyance displayed by today's teenagers, may be up there too, despite its age) for men, and I would certainly recommend it.

    It also lasts a ridiculously long time. I sprayed a tester ten hours ago. I have since showered, and I can still smell l'Instant on my wrist.

    19 August, 2008

    rating


    John Varvatos by John Varvatos

    It is very unique. This means that it takes getting used to.

    Once you've got used to it, of course, it smells wonderful. At first whiff there's an interestingly exotic melange of sweet fruity notes--many of which are derived from elements unused in perfumery.
    After a while it becomes less pronounced, leaving behind a warm and sweet (and refreshingly familiar) smell that, though still faintly reminiscent of its bizarre opening, is very inoffensive.

    Once you've gotten used to it (and once it dries a bit), you'll love it.

    My problem with this, however, is that, if it takes getting used to, how could it possibly attract someone of the same/opposite sex? I mean, it's downright offensive until you warm up to it, so it's really not much of a compliment-getter until it dries down to its warm vanilla base.

    So, for your own pleasure, spray this well before you leave the house, and, for the pleasure of others, leave once it's had some serious time to dry.

    19 August, 2008

    rating


    Vetiver by Guerlain

    I sampled this in a comsmetics store, and I really liked it.
    It is sporty and elegant, reminiscent to me of the summer time because of so many summers spent in Quebec in the company of cedar hedges and pine trees.

    It, unfortunately, smells too old for me. This isn't because of any intrinsic old-man quality of the fragrance. Indeed, it smells very fresh and sporty. The problem is that my generations' fathers wore scents like Vetiver.
    And it's awfully hard to find something sexy when it reminds you of your father.

    Another criticism I have of Vetiver is that, at least for me, it is a little too reminiscent of other fragrances that one can get for cheaper. The opening is unfortunately a lot like the cheap English Leather, with the middle notes and base notes a little too much like the original Polo by Ralph Lauren. In fact, when I came home from the store, my left arm still smelling quite strongly of Vetiver,
    my father remarked that, if I had wanted to get Polo, he would gladly have parted with his old bottle.

    19 August, 2008

    Showing 1 to 8 of 8.