Reviews by odysseusm

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    odysseusm
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    Showing 721 to 750 of 1265.
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    Cereus Pour Homme No. 14 by Cereus

    This has great potential with its herbal notes and wood. It fails for me due to an over-emphasis on violet leaves and very sweet amber. Those things dominate, in fact obliterate, the better elements. I had to scrub this off to remove the cloying, sweet, vanilla notes. Sorry gents, this didn't work on my skin (or to my taste) at all.

    15th March, 2010

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    Tuscan Soul by Salvatore Ferragamo

    Notes: citrus, bergamot, tomato leaf, petitgrain, magnolia and orange blossom, iris flower, fig leaf
    I like this scent. It starts with a very good citrus opening – one that smells zesty, natural, and refreshing. There is the merest hint of green (tomato leaf) here, nothing so pronounced as one finds in Eau de Campagne by Sisley. The scent opens up into a gorgeous floral chord which is attractive but not too sweet or heavy. The dry-down moves into a green and slightly woody note, courtesy of the fig leaf. Not a hint of ‘coconut’ from this fig. All in all, a great Italian-style and unisex scent, one that is light and translucent. Sure, you need to re-apply it during the day but that is part of its summery charm.

    11th March, 2010

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    Peau d'Espagne by Santa Maria Novella

    This is a delightful, old-school scent: at once dryly herbal and richly perfume-y. Aromatic spices and perhaps some oakmoss give this a scent like fine old fougere soap. The leather note is restrained, interesting, and elusive. This has a suave, smooth, attractive character. The notes are substantial but not heavy. They are natural-smelling, and thankfully not sweet or cloying. This one intrigues me, since I don’t usually like leather scents.

    08th March, 2010

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    Rose Poivrée by The Different Company

    Wow – this really does NOT work for me! First of all, I get no rose at all. Second, the coriander seems to be aided, abetted and overwhelmed by a tangy-brown cumin note. Along with some sweaty civet, this produces an odd metallic note which I find quite unpleasant. Rotting celery leaves, old curry, and greasy salami come to mind.

    08th March, 2010

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    Or Black by Pascal Morabito

    For a while, I found myself appreciating this scent – and that surprised me, since I really have no fondness for leather scents, or quirky avante-garde techno scents (which this seems like to me). Yet, for a while I was pleasantly tolerating this. It starts off with an interesting sage and aromatic herb note. It seemed like some sage soaps I own. The leather note emerged quickly, and at that point it was OK. Dark brown notes appeared, which reminded me of rubber and dark chocolate. Still, I could appreciate it, and I these are not my usual notes at all. As long as these elements remained dry and translucent, I was OK with the scent. But then they got dense, sweet and stronger. The rubber-leather chord got to be too much for me. I’ll only give this a neutral; others who like these notes may enjoy this scent.

    08th March, 2010

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    Parfum d'Habit by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    This is a very attractive scent, and I like it. Admittedly, it is a substantial beast. I think it has 1980’s style but a modern sensibility. How is this possible? This scent shows a classy restraint. The heavy weapons are deployed very strategically. Amber and vanilla (normally sweet or cloying) are done in a minimalist style and give just a rounding touch. Leather and patchouli are present but not obnoxious. The net effect is that this scent is more translucent than the dense war-horses of years past.
    What shines through for me is the sandalwood, with a great touch of incense. The sandalwood is really done in a dry and woody style, rather than a rich and creamy one. I appreciate that. The incense likely is frankincense, and it gives a slightly green and pine-y note. The patchouli works with the incense and gives a minty, leafy note.
    This wears very well throughout the day.

    04th March, 2010

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    Bleecker Street by Bond No. 9

    This is a pleasant scent – for me, nothing more.
    First of all, I don’t see it as green (as many have). I think the violet leaf gives its typical “silvery” note here. This isn’t as piercing a note as we see in something like Grey Flannel: it is softened by some bright florals. Bleecker is definitely aquatic and fresh in character, and a bit sweet. There is light wood and a hint of moss. Thankfully, the base notes of vanilla, amber and patchouli are so mild that I don’t find them problematic.
    For me, this is an innocuous scent. There is nothing to dislike, and nothing to seek out.

    03rd March, 2010

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    Versailles pour Homme by Jean Desprez

    This is a complex, substantial scent. While its rich elements make it something not in my style, I can appreciate it. It has an extensive list of ingredients! It is marked by several phases.
    The first phase has green, spicy notes. Clary sage is prominent here. The second is of spicy wood. It is smooth, and brightened by a bit of pine. The third phase is a light vanilla-leather. I don’t usually like these elements, yet they are not sweet here and are controlled. I can go with the flow. The fourth phase is of dry patchouli. This has an earthy, leathery aspect. The fifth phase, several hours later, is a mossy patchouli chord that is elegant and genteel.
    I agree with the comment that this scent is better experienced as sillage than close-up. The cloud blends some of the more heavy elements into a pleasant cloud.
    For my taste, I would stop at the end of phase two and be satisfied. Then this would be bottle-worthy for me. However, it is a good scent overall.

    02nd March, 2010

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    Figleaf & Lime by Zen for Men

    This is a budget fragrance of good value. It has a great lime opening, which is very zesty and citric. It settles into a pleasant green-leaf and wood chord. It is refreshing and bright. The lime has good longevity. The leaf note is a generic green rather than a distinctive fig, but given the price of this product I won’t complain. A simple scent, but quite acceptable.

    25th February, 2010

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    Cypress Yuzu by Zen for Men

    Well, anything with ‘cypress’ in the title gets my immediate attention! Yuzu gets the ball rolling, with a very bright, aromatic, grapefruit-like scent. The scent becomes quite green, and it is a refreshing summer splash. There are clean, moderately woody tones here as well. Perhaps it is not distinctively cypress but it is acceptable as a generic sort of wood. The scent is not sweet, not “budget-frag” in character. It seems simple, natural, and easy-to-wear. It is at a great price, and it comes in a full line of products (EDC spray, aftershave balm, body lotion, shower gel, and glycerine soap.) The soap is excellent. This all seems like a no-brainer to get! There is attractive packaging as well. A great budget fragrance!

    25th February, 2010

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    Rose by Czech & Speake

    This has a very green, crisp opening. When I say crisp, I mean crisp! It is like biting into a tart green apple. It moves into a rose note which is delicate rather than heady. It is a very green sort of rose scent, a bit odd if you are thinking of deep red roses and the scent they give. Eventually the rose takes on a more conventional character, and there is a hint of tangy patchouli.

    25th February, 2010

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    Mimosa by Czech & Speake

    This is a gorgeous floral scent. It is so heady that it briefly has a slightly volatile, rubbery aspect. It is an ornate cloud: somewhat sweet but not cloying or heavy. The impression is that of lily of the valley – on steroids! A dry, earthy note emerges in the dry-down. Here’s a floral that I could wear once in a while and enjoy. I'm surprised at all the negative reviews. I'm no big fan of florals but I can appreciate this.

    25th February, 2010

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    Monocle Scent Two: Laurel by Comme des Garçons

    Laurel and other herbs, pepper, cedar, patchouli, frankincense, amber

    I'm revising my review. There are parts of this I like and parts that have trouble endorsing.
    I've tried this many, many times in the shop.
    Good points: very green and aromatic, a dry and powerful peppery-herbal mix.
    Reservations: on my skin, it gets tiresome after a while. For me, it is a very powerful and assertive one-note wonder. No grace notes. No subtlety.
    I love dry herbal scents. The fact that I keep trying this, and wanting to like it... and don't quite like it, says something to me.
    It is a marvelous, challenging, dry and aromatic scent. Try it and see how it suits you.

    17th February, 2010 (Last Edited: 26th February, 2011)

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    Marc Jacobs for Men by Marc Jacobs

    Notes: Italian bergamot, Tuscan cypress, cumin, cardamom, ginger, fig leaves, Provence fig, rose de mai, cyclamen, tonka bean, cedarwood, nirvanolide musk, Indonesian patchouli, musk
    This is a smooth, easy-going fig-leaf scent. It is green, and not as crisp or edgy as some fig scents. The usual creamy coconut hint is here. The elements are well blended. The dry-down is nice, clean-soapy, and with hints of wood and incense. I think this is a good introduction to fig scents.

    16th February, 2010 (Last Edited: 08th April, 2011)

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    Elixir by Penhaligon's

    In my estimation, this is a poorly designed scent. The reason? There is an over-emphasis on rosewood. Rosewood is a heady, *extremely potent* scent. A tiny bit goes a long way. I find that the rosewood (with its furniture-polish connotations) simply overwhelms the other potentially interesting ingredients. The opening has much promise. Languid florals, deep woods and peppery spices engage in a shimmering interplay which is fascinating! If it only lasted for more than a minute! Then the rosewood portcullis gate slams down and the scent seems one-dimensional to me. The scent remains stuck in that groove for the remainder of the time.

    16th February, 2010 (Last Edited: 31st March, 2010)

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    LP No.9 for Men by Penhaligon's

    I find two stages here. The first is masculine and dark. It has dark flowers and deep spices which are brightened by a citrus edge. This strikes a romantic note and I like it. The second phase is a spicy, animalic musk. It is too rich for my blood. It reminds me of Kiehl’s musk oil. It is OK until the vanilla and patchouli kick in. A sweet vanilla note is the death-knell for a scent on my skin. I will give it a neutral rating because I recognize my prejudice against vanilla and because (even for me) it has flashes of brilliance.

    16th February, 2010 (Last Edited: 31st March, 2010)

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    Macchia Mediterranea by Borsari

    I’m disappointed in this scent. I like Aqua Classico by Borsari, and the imagery of “macchia” mentioned by Quarry is very appealing. This had the potential to be a garrigue-style of scent. It didn’t work that way on my skin. I found three distinct phases. The first was a fruity, sweet musk. The second was the VERY dusty dry smell of old herbs and spices that is mentioned below. I like this part! It is very interesting, but too brief. The third phase, that of the dry-down, is violet, sweet spice, and musk. This phase has the unfortunate connotation of rancid nut paste for me, and it has severe tenacity. So, the scent just doesn’t work for me.

    12th February, 2010

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    Charmes et Feuilles by The Different Company

    Notes: aromatic herbs (sage, marjoram, serpolet/wild thyme), Indian jasmine, peppermint leaves, grapefruit, clementine, patchouli
    This is a nice scent in two distinct phases. The first is citrus and herbs. Lovely orange blossom-like notes are here. The scent is very zesty, refreshing, and slightly soapy in character. The mint leaves give it real green freshness without a “toothpaste” aspect. The second phase is introduced by jasmine which is closely followed by patchouli. I find that the jasmine and patchouli together here produce a tobacco-leaf chord. At times I find a hay or coumarin sort of note. This is the distinctive feature of the dry-down. It seems like a summery, natural sort of scent to me.

    12th February, 2010

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    Lalique pour Homme Blue / Faune by Lalique

    The juice is slightly blue, as befits an aquatic scent. I find this to be simple stuff: crisp, fresh, blue-aquatic. It starts slightly sweet and gets bigger and sweeter. There is a bit of wood and spice in the dry-down, but nothing particularly noteworthy. In my opinion, this smells a bit cheap and loud.

    12th February, 2010

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    Encre Noire pour Elle by Lalique

    This is a lovely floral scent. It opens on a rather sweet note, but this sweetness quickly burns off. What is left is an airy, refined floral accord bolstered by hints of very light vetiver and wood. The rose and jasmine-like osmanthus are very elegant. The vetiver is nowhere near the grassy intensity of Encre Noir (men’s version). Certainly worth a try – and men could wear this. Interestingly, I don't see any 'dark' aspects to either this scent or the men's version. They both seem 'bright' to me.

    11th February, 2010

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    L'Eau de Jatamansi by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    Notes: Jatamansi (spikenard), grapefruit, cardamom, clary sage, rose, ylang-ylang, Indian papyrus, incense, guaiacum (champaca wood oil).
    This starts with an aromatic note which features good grapefruit scents. It is spicy and soapy, and the spices are smoothly blended together. The florals are also very pleasant: first to appear is the ylang-ylang, followed by the rose. There are some light woody-incense notes, and the scent becomes a tiny bit sweet. The spikenard gives a tangy, aromatic note which comes off a bit like cold tea. The rose and champaca notes develop, yet the fresh-woody aspect also hangs in there. This is an exotic, floral, lightly-incensed scent: quite interesting and distinctive. The dry-down gets a bit more sweet but not problematically so. I find this to be a unisex scent: not too woody for a women’s market and not too floral for a men’s market.

    11th February, 2010

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    Un Parfum des Sens et Bois by The Different Company

    Notes: white violet, black papper, ginger, elemi, Chinese cedarwood
    This is a great scent, in the gentle woody-spice category. The florals are attractive; soft but not sweet or heavy. The pepper is rendered very accurately and is excellent. The cedar is marvelous, giving the impression of a cedar chest full of spices. At times there is an interesting salty note, like salty skin. Good longevity here. I like this and recommend it. (Note: not to be confused with Miller Harris’ En Sens de Bois which is also very good.)

    04th February, 2010

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    Riverside Drive by Bond No. 9

    It is difficult for me to be objective about this, since sweet aquatics are not my style in any fashion. I can say that it has a slightly green, translucent opening. There are hints of silvery violet leaf. The scent is smooth, and it is hard to pick out many individual notes. In fact, there is not much that is distinctive here. I find the dry-down to be sweet and synthetic-smelling, with very vague notes of patchouli and wood.

    04th February, 2010

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    Hanami by Ayala Moriel

    This is an intriguing scent. Attention vanilla fans (female and male) -- this is something you want to check out! I am not a vanilla fan, so this scent can only take me so far. However, I can recognize the marvelous artistry here.
    The scent was part of a poetry project, in which perfumers were given the task to create a scent to evoke the vivid imagery of Ezra Pound's minimalist poem "In a Station of the Metro"
    The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
    Petals on a wet, black bough.

    Ayala categorizes this as a "wet woody-floral" and it is exactly that.
    It opens with haunting and piercing floral notes, and very woody vanilla. So far the scent is powerful but not particularly sweet. It is very woody, yet it has a translucent, sheer quality. Grassy vetiver adds to the mix. Gradually the tuberose and attar become more prominent, and these add an exotic, other-worldly quality. The dry down gets much more sweet, and the vanilla reappears.
    Vanilla isn't my particular sort of note. However, I give this a good rating due to the care and creativity here. I'm sure that vanilla fans will love this!

    01st February, 2010

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    Lalique pour Homme Equus by Lalique

    I find this to be an improvement over the LpH (Lion’s head) scent. However, it rates a neutral at best for me. There are some attractive elements: juniper and violet leaves add fresh, bright notes to what is a very smooth and fairly rich scent. No complaint with the spices, although they are not distinct enough to identify as specific types. The woods are very good, in particular the cedar/sequoia is well done. My issue with this scent is the sweet musk, which threatens to overpower the proceedings. When that finally burns off several hours later, a great cedar note remains. This is a smooth, rounded scent with no real edges. Many might like it.

    26th January, 2010

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    Knize Ten by Knize

    This is a complex and intriguing scent. The opening is too brief on my skin. It is a short burst of bergamot and pine-like rosemary. The middle has some woody notes but is mostly floral (orris and rose in particular) and spicy. The combination of scents here is a bit soapy (even rubbery) and barbershop-like; it is pleasant in an old-school way. The scents deepen. I wondered if the sweetness would become overwhelming… then it stepped back and a most interesting bitter-aromatic note took over. Perhaps this is due to the castoreum. I like this note, it is beautiful and even haunting. It is a good counterpoint to the sweetness of the amber and vanilla. The overall effect is poised and elegant. The final dry down is old leather and a return of the orris. I’m not a fan of those elements, and yet I enjoy the scent. At this point I can’t say it is bottle-worthy for me, but I certainly find a lot to appreciate.

    14th January, 2010

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    Magnifico I: Mirto Imperiale by I Profumi di Firenze

    Apart from myrtle, I don’t know what fragrance notes are here. Essentially this is a soliflore.
    It starts off green, aromatic, fresh and invigorating; and it at this point it is a classically Mediterranean masculine sort of scent. Since it is an EDP it is powerful and has good longevity. It becomes more aromatic and develops a powerful (and pleasant) soapy note. Myrtle essential oil is reported to have a spicy, nutmeg-like quality; and I do get a bit of a spicy aspect here. If you like a very distinctive, fresh, substantial, green and soapy scent then you will enjoy this – as I do.

    18th December, 2009 (Last Edited: 16th February, 2010)

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    Polo by Ralph Lauren

    First of all – the juice is green! A pale, blue-green colour (this is not apparent unless you have a decant, since the glass bottle is an emerald green colour). I wonder why they bother to colour the liquid.
    The list of notes is complex. In theory, it should start with a pine-y, coniferous opening, supported by herbal-green notes. The herbals should continue into the mid, augmented by spices and florals. The base looks old-school, with all the heavy-hitters of the era. Here is how it performed on me:
    The opening is big, zippy and aromatic. There are green notes, in particular a gin-like juniper and a dark green absinthe/artemesia note. I also get spices at this early stage. Don’t get any pine. Very quickly, a patchouli-leather note takes over. It is tangy, and a bit sweet (but not bad). A nice hay-like smell of pipe tobacco settles in, perhaps due to some coumarin. It remains that way into the dry-down, perhaps with the faintest of resinous frankincense lurking at the edge and a slight and pleasant soapy quality from the oakmoss.
    This is not a bad scent, and I like it more than I thought I would. I regret the short-lived green notes and (for me) the non-existent pine notes. I’m not a fan of patchouli, but if this scent is applied in small doses the patchouli doesn’t become obnoxious. I’ll give it a thumbs-up for the interesting ingredients.

    16th December, 2009

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    Cuir Mauresque by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    For a while, I could find things to appreciate in this scent. As it dried down, it turned into a scrubber.
    The opening is sweet and aromatic, and rather interesting. The aldehyde florals were very bright and zippy. Spices (cloves and cinnamon particularly) and some woods were good. There was also a bright metallic note: at first I thought it was violet leaf, but some have suggested aloe wood (oud) and it may be that. The combo of all of these was smooth. It was a round, opulent scent but not problematic. It was more floral and sweet than I like, but I found it interesting. Then cumin, something like indolic iris, and leather emerged. These got oppressive and rather fusty. I got the image of a very aged and somewhat eccentric aunt, wearing loads of makeup and too much scent. Exit, stage left, scrubbing all the way.

    13th December, 2009

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    Pancaldi by Hanorah

    Overall, this is a nice scent. I’m not a fan of patchouli, but although it is present here I think it is used with restraint.
    This starts with a beautiful citrus-green note. It quickly morphs into a slightly soapy and spicy chord. Cloves are the dominant spice, giving this an old-school barbershop character. Dusky green notes lurk at the edges. Moss and leathery notes start to appear. The patchouli hints at salt, leather, and tangy leaves. The dry-down is an aromatic, slightly acidic blend of patchouli and herbals.
    I’m slightly more than neutral on this. I think it is well-made and classy in its late 80’s way. So the thumb points up – although I don’t think I’d seek it out for myself.

    09th December, 2009

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