Fragrance Reviews from September 2005

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    gorkem's avatar



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    Acqua di Giò pour Homme by Giorgio Armani

    I think this is the best one in the world. Also it's long lasting. I smell it on my shirt even after 5 days, so fantastic. Refreshes and gives energy. Also it can be sensed from even 2 meters away, people don't need to fall into you to smell it. Perfect. Girls love it much!

    17 September, 2005

    IPaidForThisName's avatar



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    Cuir Mauresque by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    I never thought Tabac Blond could be improved upon. Cuir Mauresque is a beautifully rich and smooth leather fragrance with a very subdued candied orange note. It’s sweet, muted, powerful, and very rich. Tabac Blond can be difficult to wear in many situations; it’s heavy and unrelenting, but Cuir Mauresque has a balance and user friendliness that Tabac Blond does not. This is also much in the same vein as Dzing! A sweet, almost gourmand leather fragrance.

    17 September, 2005

    IPaidForThisName's avatar



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    Signoricci by Nina Ricci

    I like this one a lot. It’s been a while since I’ve been wowed by a fragrance. To me, this smells like a fragrance dominated by nuts and coriander. It’s very unique. When I first smelled it I thought it smelled almost like a fall/winter version of live jazz.

    17 September, 2005

    IPaidForThisName's avatar



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    Biche Dans l'Absinthe by Gobin Daudé

    This is awful. What is this? Is it a joke? I’ve had more absinthe than I’d like to remember, and I can say, with 100% certainty, this smells nothing like absinthe. Maybe it’s just a couple bad nights, but I don’t really find the taste and smell of absinthe very pleasant. This opens with a peppery teriyaki kind of note, then fades into a boring slightly sweet woody base. The drydown on this is so generic and poorly done. It’s a sweet woody base with a slightly green accord that makes it smell a little like honey. This is NOT worth the money. Not awful, but not worth the money.

    17 September, 2005 (Last Edited: 18 September, 2005)

    IPaidForThisName's avatar



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    Kiehl's Original Musk by Kiehl's

    Surprisingly enough, this is a muted, tamed, and neutered Muscs Koublai Khan. It’s slightly dirty and smooth musk. It’s well made, and very wearable, but it’s not nearly as interesting as MKK or Musc Ravageur. It’s great for the price.

    17 September, 2005

    makemepretty's avatar



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    La Chasse Aux Papillons by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    Beautiful fragrance, the notes are lovely(jasmine, tuberose, linden) my only complaint is it's not very long lasting. It starts off quite nicely but after about an hour I can only catch a bit of it from my clothing. This smells like a breeze of spring air scented from a flower garden.

    17 September, 2005

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    Centaure by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Oh wow.....I LOVE this one!! A very unique citrus over wood that makes itself a tad spicier after a few hours. Very refreshing but not "fresh" if that makes any sense. NIce and cool but refined and classic. Really, really nice. I love it!

    17 September, 2005

    Ren's avatar



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    Passage d'Enfer by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    It's very unique. Opens up with frankincense and floral notes over a smoky wood-incense base. I like it at first, but it's very short lived on me and never transforms like other people have mentioned. Seems like it would work nicely in spring and possibly fall. In its last phases before it disappears it becomes very powdery and this irks me a bit. Because it doesn't project very well, the floral notes could be misinterpreted as baby powder.

    It's really original and opens up very nicely, but has little staying power and turns a tad unpleasant towards the end of its life. Nice, but not a plausible purchase for me.

    17 September, 2005

    Allen-on-Holiday's avatar

    United States United States

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    Spark Seduction for Men by Liz Claiborne

    I don't know what the notes in Spark Seduction are, but I got some of this sprayed on my hand today and realized it reminds me of 2 other fragrances: Burberry London, and Lacoste "Style in Play" (the red one), so I think there's cinnamon in it. It didn't last long, and both Lacoste and London seem to be better scents.

    18 September, 2005

    Allen-on-Holiday's avatar

    United States United States

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    Soul by Curve for Men by Liz Claiborne

    When I tried "Soul by Curve" today, I knew it was a Liz Claiborne scent... but it reminded me of something else... and then, I realized what: the drydown smells like Bora Bora, which I already have, so I saved my money.

    18 September, 2005

    Artisankey's avatar

    United States United States

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    Quelques Fleurs L'Original by Houbigant

    Quelques Fleurs L'Original opens like eternal-springtime-in-a-bottle. It has a fresh, light, greenness that I never seem to grow tired of. As it matures it loses its green edge and becomes a sweet, fresh bouquet of early summer wild flowers. It's floral the way Joy is floral, yet where Joy becomes full-bodied and womanly, QqF retains the light flutter of innocence without being "too young." In fact QqF actually becomes quite sophisticated the more it dries down. While it does have the "triple threat" of rose, jasmine, and tuberose, I hardly find this perfume to be a heavy or cloying one.

    Ideal for any season, in the summer it holds its own against the heat and makes me feel a bit fresher while in the winter it remains the promise of springtime. Floral and feminine to the nth-degree, it has a coolness about it which I've always associated as being perfect for any setting- be it work or play. If you are a lover of florals this is one not to miss.

    18 September, 2005

    Bael's avatar



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    A*Men / Angel Men by Thierry Mugler

    For someone used to wearing the more popular light and marine male scents these days, A*Men can be a bit difficult to tame at first. It is very strong and doesn't wear off quickly - definitely spray in the air and walk through it, and only in hot spots to quicken the drydown. You want this stuff to dry down as quickly as possible. The initial mix of notes can wrinkle the nose, but dries down to what I'd call a dark vanilla. Whoever called the scent "brooding" used the perfect word. Women who have liked this on me have called it a very masculine and sexual scent, appropriate for romantic evenings or getting close. Another reviewer noted that A*Men should not be worn in professional or office settings. Authority figures or suit and tie positions could pull it off, as there is a certain aggressiveness to the scent.

    18 September, 2005

    buffysmf's avatar



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    Ruffles by Oscar de la Renta

    From the first time I smelled this fragrance I was hooked. It was the only thing I wore. It made me feel feminine without being too much or reminding of stuff that my grandma wore, like so many perfumes do. My husband said it was one of the things that made him fall in love with me because he could leave after being with me and still "smell" me. It has such a nice simple smell, sweet without being cloying,...a little like cotton candy. We both were upset when it seemed that suddenly it was gone. I gave up searching for a time and now it seems I have found some (10 years later). As silly as it sounds, I am very excited and can't wait to be able to smell "Ruffles" again. It has such wonderful memories tied to it, not to mention, you can't imagine the number of compliments I used to receive! Even just seeing a picture of that oh-so familiar bottle made me smile. Funny, how you can miss something as simple as "your" fragrance so much without realizing.

    18 September, 2005

    calchic's avatar



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    Escape by Calvin Klein

    I wore this pretty steadily when it was still relatively new on the market until one day - ugh! - it turned on me and made me incredibly dizzy and sick-feeling. It's been touch and go ever since, and I always experience some degree of trepidation when trying it on again. Bottom line: this is an extremely strong fragrance that may make others in your presence want to ESCAPE if you apply more than a few extremely discreet dabs. The topline of it is innocuous enough, actually quite soft in some ways due to the pretty noticeable chamomile with its fruity mellowness. That's all fine and good, but once you start venturing into the rather heavy heart segment of the composition, replete with coriander and clove, things begin to get more intense. What kicks it into hardcore head rattler, though, is a very pointed dose of sandalwood in the basenote. Too much sandalwood can be a serious dealbreaker; it's the reason a lot of people have trouble with Samsara and, as best I can tell, with this one as well. Sandalwood can become bug-spray city sometimes, in certain combinations and intensity levels, and I am quite sure it's the culprit here. I guess not everyone's bothered by it, as there seem to be quite a few Escape lovers out there, but do be cognizant of the possible sandalwood-induced side effects of this one!

    18 September, 2005

    calchic's avatar



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    Escada Margaretha Ley by Escada

    The early part of the 1990s saw the releases of some pretty heady fragrances - guess the "power scents" of the 1980s were still wielding a bit of influence - and this sure was, and still is, one of them. I worked for a fashion magazine at the time and so was often the recipient of beauty biz new launches, and was introduced to Escada by Margaretha Ley in triplicate via a big, honking set of fragrance, body lotion and shower gel. As with Calvin Klein Escape, another early 90s launch that I received gratis, I wore Escada in relative abundance and quite happily until one day I was suddenly seized with inexplicable headache and nausea. It actually took me a little while to realize my own fragrance was making me sick, it turned on me that suddenly and out of the blue. I have since worn it sparingly, never again layered, and only when I've had access to an open window and/or fresh air source. This is a strong waft, one that would probably be overly cloying with its notes of peach, coconut, frangipani and vanilla if it weren't for the sandalwood at the base of the composition. Ah yes, the sandalwood that both saves and slays; again, as with Escape, I'm convinced that it's the sandalwood here that ultimately is just too strong and bug-sprayish. Sure, it provides great staying power, but when your scent's making you sick, is that a good thing? All that said, I don't dislike this fragrance once in a great while on the right occasion; it is rich and luxurious and unlike many of the much wimpier juices that come out on the market these days. As long as I exercise tremendous restraint in the application, I can stil handle this headstrong scent.

    18 September, 2005

    calchic's avatar



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    Bal à Versailles by Jean Desprez

    A pitch-perfect blend of florals, spices, resins and vanilla, highlighted by citruses and underscored by mosses and incense. It's true, not much is left out of Bal a Versailles; it's much like many of the classic Carons in the sense that it includes a huge compendium of notes that would seem to create nothing more than a very busy mish-mash. Yet like Caron's original master perfumer Ernest Daltroff, Jean Desprez obviously knew what he was doing when he brought forth Bal a Versailles, and it remains a classic today because of that. Mainly, it is an ambery oriental with undertones of sweet orange, powder and spice. Unlike many slightly younger orientals, though (Bal a Versailles having been launched in 1962), it is refined to an extreme and not one to overpower, induce headaches, enter the room before its wearer, etc. Personally, I think that's because the florals here of the "drier," less sweet and less cloying variety, with Grasse jasmine and a very high-quality Bulgarian rose among them. This is a highly wearable fragrance and low-key enough to wear any time and with anything, casual or dress or anywhere in between. I wish the other fragrances of Jean Desprez were as relatively easy to come by as Bal a Versailles, as I would love to find out more about his craftsmanship. If Bal a Versaille is any indication, Monsieur Desprez definitely stands as a fragrance legend.

    18 September, 2005

    calchic's avatar



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    Fleurs des Comores by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Love, love, love this fragrance. Funny, it's not immensely different from Secrete Datura, another MPG fragrance that is also good but bordering on oppressively heavy. Fleur de Comores is not light, to be sure, but just seems to be more balanced than the Secrete; instead of Secrete's near-overpowering white florals, here you have a very warm vanilla topped with passionfruit, lightly spiced with orange blossom and supported by ambergris, vetiver and musk (which is also what supports Secrete, though that has cedar in the base as well.) There's also just enough jasmine in Fleurs de Comores to give it a floral touch without making it a floral per se. It's essentially a very elegant couture vanilla with an exotic touch, and it's stupendous. I cannot find fault with it in any way, though I'd say to apply with some judiciousness as, again, it's not a lightweight scent. The lasting power is also superb, something not always true of MPG fragrances.

    18 September, 2005

    calchic's avatar



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    Secrète Datura by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    The datura itself - mystery bloom, opens only at night, deadly if consumed - is portrayed here by a series of notes that include orange blossom, heliotrope, neroli and jasmine and that really don't sound so intense on paper but combine to create a palpably thick, heavy floriental. It bears some resemblance, believe it or not, to the famously heavy Escada by Margaretha Ley (NOT Collection but the other one, in the red bottle - the one many people find too strong!) Mainly a white floral with a pronounced dash of neroli-induced spiciness, this fragrance will treat you badly if you overapply. Underneath the florals, there is a gourmand-ish touch (some consider it chocolate-y and I would tend to agree) as well as a little bit of bitterness. All combine for something that is admittedly very, very lovely if not easy to pull off. To be worn when you really want to make a statement in a very big way; I've never worn this without getting some level of recognition, whether positive or negative, from those around me.

    18 September, 2005

    calchic's avatar



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    Eau de Camélia Chinois by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Though it's often touted as a fresh and clean fragrance, I find Eau de Camelia Chinois heavy and "off" in an odd way. There is a strong topnote of grapefruit, which can be a pungent and sour note in some cases and is here, coming up against a strong, rather bitter green tea and, at the base, a strong and somewhat bug-sprayish sandalwood. And woven in there is a basil note that lends a certain oiliness. Altogether, not my idea of fresh! I can see what the concept of the fragrance is trying to accomplish but the reality of it is difficult to wear. I once used a particular brand of hair toner (stuff you put in your hair after coloring/bleaching) that smelled much like this fragrance does, and I can't say I find that a particularly positive thing! I think personal chemistry plays a role in this particular scent, though, too, as I've met two other people on whom it smelled glorious.

    18 September, 2005

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    Ambre Précieux by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    What a spectacular amber this is - I would recommend it to anyone who even moderately likes amber as a note. The composition of notes here, with an emphasis on balsams as well as amber, yields a deep golden-smelling fragrance with a satiny texture so smooth that I almost think this is better as a women's fragrance. It's very sweet - in spite of the myrtle-lavendar topnotes -with its heart of amber and vanilla sparked by nutmeg. This is easily a staple scent for me, especially in the cooler months when its qualities shine through with the most clarity.

    18 September, 2005

    calchic's avatar



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    Grain de Plaisir by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Celery's just not a very pleasant note in a fragrance, no matter what you mix with it, and this is a celery scent first and foremost. The very refreshing blast of topnotes - lemon and mint - make this an extremely pleasant fragrance at first. But they don't stick around for long, and then you're into the celery seed stage. For those who've not encountered celery in a scent, it's sweetish and radiates a great deal of heat, almost a bodily heat. It's just generally tough to wear for many. The fact that it's combined here with myrtle, lavendar, fir, vetiver, musk and sandalwood makes it slightly, slightly more bearable - fir alone is also a strong note, and its clean qualities do balance out somewhat the reeking of the celery. But the alchemy of the notes also brings out a certain bitterness in the drydown. So, to recap, you go from fresh to reeking to bitter. That's quite challenging, to say the least!

    18 September, 2005

    calchic's avatar



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    Sanguine Muskissime by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    This may not be the most complex or original composition in the fragrance universe, but my gosh it's gorgeous. The pairing of blood orange -tart yet also almost honey-like in its thick sweetness - as well as two types of mandarin and a little bit of peach with a sweet, somewhat powdery, vaguely spicy musk yields a delicious skin scent that I like wearing best in the summer. It's very light and non-obtrusive; in fact, I would dock it only for being not terribly long-lasting or of sturdy sillage. It's much more of a personal space fragrance for the time that it's even detectable. Frequent reapplication is worth it for the renewal of the juicy topnote alone; of course, it's not exactly an economically priced scent, so if you love it be prepared to lay out some serious cash! I've gone through two bottles in two summers and will probably invest in a third because I love it so. Definitely one of MPG's best-ever scents.

    18 September, 2005

    David_M's avatar



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    Paul Smith London for Men by Paul Smith

    Well, last reviewer said this smells like grey Flannel, I disagree, I think its more along the lines of John Varvatos, sort like a very formal and sophisticated scent,

    18 September, 2005

    Dennis's avatar

    United States United States

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    "Vintage" Tabaróme by Creed

    The definitive, classic fragrance for a man unconcerned with following trends. There are no sweet, floral, or fresh notes here--just a smooth, dark, and confident aura that smells clean and musky all at once. A masterpiece that withstands the test of time.

    18 September, 2005

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    Habit Rouge Eau de Toilette Légère by Guerlain

    Being that the original was created back in 1965, I never thought I would wear a "dated" fragrance. Not until Guerlain released a Legere (means light in French) version, I was brave enough to give it a try. Because it wasn't released here in the US, by the grace and generosity of steely glint here on the Basenotes forum I managed to get a practically full bottle of the stuff. NO REGRETS, PEOPLE!!! At first because I didn't know what I was expecting, I was taken aback by the strong topnotes of lemon and lime! It remains on the rest of the drydown, but doesn't take first fiddle afterwards. The oriental part emerges, sensual, sweet with vanilla, some florals, with a hint of an earthy patchouli and warm woods. I managed to sample the original finally, and rather than the lemon-lime note taking the scent out of the depths like the Legere, they soon disappear a lot quicker and let the oriental notes prevail. They're both good and they both have their purpose in my fragrance wardrobe.

    18 September, 2005 (Last Edited: 25 September, 2005)

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    Soie Rouge by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Soie Rouge is from the womens line. It deserves mention here, because it is unique. Soie Rouge is an audacious blend of Carnation, fruit, and pepper. This goes on smelling very floral, but soon the fruit and pepper accords come out and create one of the most unusual fragrances. It is very true to its name in that it smells very ‘red’. Soie Rouge is a very red. This could easily be worn by both genders.

    18 September, 2005

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    Sa Majesté la Rose by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    Sa Majeste la Rose is the best rose fragrance I have come across. It’s a ripe and dewy rose fragrance with notes of honey to further soften it. It’s also got a very interesting green nature that makes it smell, quite literally, alive. That would usually be harsh and grating in a rose fragrance, but the honey neutralizes the green nature of the fragrance amazingly well. This can easily be worn by either gender. Highly recommended.

    18 September, 2005

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    A*Men / Angel Men by Thierry Mugler

    A*Men is, without a doubt, the best gourmand for men. Angel, while being overly sweet, is so much fun to wear. Wearing it is such a treat.

    18 September, 2005

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    Ambre Précieux by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Ambre Precieux is not just another Ambre blend. Laporte managed to create an Ambre based fragrance that was spicy, but not spicy enough to take the center stage off the Ambre. Ambre alone can be cloying, but Ambre with too much conflict can be off putting and difficult to wear for many (Ambre Sultan), but Ambre Precieux maintains enough conflict to keep it interesting throughout the entire drydown, and is also sweet enough to be warm and comforting. This is a great Ambre fragrance, and should serve as an example for anyone looking for ‘ambre’.

    18 September, 2005

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    Centaure by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Centaure is very odd. From what I can tell, it’s mostly a blend of Lavender, Mint, and wood. It’s a very unique fragrance that is slightly sour and green. It’s very energizing, and to me, equally off putting. This is not creamy lavender, but rather a screaming lavender that is encouraged by mint and woody notes. There is nothing sweet in this fragrance.

    18 September, 2005

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