Fragrance Reviews from September 2005

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    Bois de Violette by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    Many find this scent to be a breathtakingly beautiful compositon, a perfect play between the cedary woods int he background and the greenish sweet violet in the fore. I found it merely breathtaking--as in cloyingly sweet, the way violet scents can get. No woods show up on me unil hours in, and the violet is more confection than flower. I much prefer Keiko Mecheri's Genie du Bois (which may be using SL for 'inspiration), in which the woods are much stronger and slightly spicy and powdery, and the violet shrinks to the edges.

    18 September, 2005

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    Tea for Two by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    I love this scent! It starts out even smokier than Bvlgari Black on me (and the comparison in the first review is apt). It quickly settles into a more tea-smoky and less cigarette-smoky smell and then the honey and spices come out to mingle... the smokiness keeps it from being too sweet, like Ginestet Botrytis can sometimes be, and the tea and mild spice notes lend a refreshing naturalness to what could have been a very cloying composition.

    18 September, 2005

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    Poivre Piquant by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    i love all colors of pepper in real life, and loooove Caron Poivre, so I was expecting a piquant/ picante scent. Something with kick, and life , and daring. What i got in poivre piquant was a neutral, rather than warm, and aqueous-fuzzy, rather than sharp and dry, very 'white' pepper-herbal-airy scent. Not offensive at all, but not enchanting or beguiling or the slightest bit out-there... I suppose it is somewhat unique, but I would not buy the trio for it. Edt strength probably does not help matters.

    18 September, 2005

    Thumper's avatar



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    Acqua di Giò pour Homme by Giorgio Armani

    If you want to smell like a freshman in highschool go for it. over rated, to common price tag sucks. there are much better out there and its hard to stand out when a bunch of people are wearing this

    18 September, 2005

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    Hugo Energise by Hugo Boss

    Really liked this stuff smelt it at a department store and had it on a card and it lasted a long time on it and my skin. woke up the next morning and could smell it. Is very strong at first just let it dry down a little before you go out. Got a bunch of compliment the first night i had it on.

    18 September, 2005

    Uzkalnis's avatar



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    Aspen for Men by Coty

    Among fragrances you find at a drugstore, this is remarkably accomplished. One could say it is one-dimensional and that the pine and cold top note citrus is nothing new, but few fragrances manage to capture a cold, wintery mood without resorting to heavy-duty spice like Aspen. Deodorant is among the best in the business. Will bring you more joy than its low price suggests.

    18 September, 2005

    Uzkalnis's avatar



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    Fahrenheit by Christian Dior

    It does belong to a simpler and more honest time when perfumers actually tried to think of something new instead of tinkering with the existing winners and churning out 'limited editions', 'light', 'summer' and such like. The year of its release was the year of giants like Eternity and Cool Water. They were bold and trying back then, and thanks to this that era produced unashamed statements, not inoffensive mediocrities. Even those who hate Fahrenheit admit that it is distinct and impossible to confuse with anything. Since then, we had to wait for more a decade to be able to buy gems of a similar weight category - like Gucci Pour Homme.

    18 September, 2005

    Uzkalnis's avatar



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    Insensé Ultramarine by Givenchy

    Floral scent has never been so masculine. Givenchy does not boast many classics (at least in my opinion), but 1994 was the scoring year for almost everyone, and they scored too. Yes, it's fresh - but not 'like everyone else' fresh; it is complex and interesting. Terribly underrated, in my opinion. (Andrius Uzkalnis)

    18 September, 2005

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    Platinum Égoïste by Chanel

    I tried it a few times after reading TheCologneGuy's review site (admittedly, quite subjective and not always reasoned well enough, but still one of the best fragrance reads). I would say that Egoiste Platinum oozes quality and expensiveness (expensivity?), but I do not find it distinct enough. Yet another "lemony drying down to warm woods" thing, high quality, but little else.

    18 September, 2005

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    Polo by Ralph Lauren

    Oh dear oh dear. While I have seen other fragrances attracting similar degree of conflicting "love-hate" opinion, what other smell symbolizes social affiliation so distinctly?

    Just read the reviews. It is amazing. Not only it is loved by those who loved the eighties, it is also actively reviled by those who hated the era (maybe because it was one brief period where money was more sexy than dirty hair and rebellion and poetry). It is amazing how a scent symbolizes that. It is, emotionally, like the 'glacier green' color of a BMW (now quite dated and available as special order only), which is essentially the same hue as the front of a dollar note. You either love it or hate it.

    (Andrius Užkalnis)

    18 September, 2005 (Last Edited: 26 November, 2005)

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    Aramis Life by Aramis

    One of the few fragrances where the top note is as interesting as the base. I was surprised to see lime, because I always thought of a sour orange. Definitely a summer scent, grown-up and quite distinct, not 'another fresh smell'. I am going through my second bottle.

    18 September, 2005

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    Luciano Soprani Uomo by Luciano Soprani

    I assume they are talking here about Luciano Soprani Uomo. It is extremely difficult to find. I have heard of it being available from selected department stores in the US. In UK, no-one heard about it. For the past few years, it could be reliably sourced from Tokyo Narita Airport Terminal 2 Duty Free, but only one shop, which has a "world scents" (or something like that) shelf. If you ask them, they would not have heard about it even there. Bizarre. Well, it is one of the most accomplished citrusy smells and quite distinct. The lucianosoprani(dot)it site says: "blending the sparkling citrus notes of bergamot and lemon from Calabria with fruity notes of apple and pineapple, enhanced by (...) nutmeg, delicate white pepper and sensual cinnamon and cloves (...) middle note blends lavender, jasmine and orange blossom with violet and lily. These give way to a base of woods, the pure and long-lasting Atlas Cedar (...) ebony and (...) vetiver, all accompanied by (...) amber and musk." The opening peppery, spicy lemon is remarkably well-balanced. Note how elegantly the smell evolves in warmer, woodier and sweeter base. Amazing complexity and distinctness - not "another lemony fragrance".

    18 September, 2005

    vin's avatar



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    Acqua di Giò pour Homme by Giorgio Armani

    I've been using deo-sprays all along, ande decided it was time to go to something more. So, i ditched my Axe instead of this. It smells fresh, and is not as "loud" as axe, or some of the common deo sprays.

    Stays on long enough, and is definitely recommendation worthy.

    18 September, 2005

    20scents's avatar



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    Cigar Aficionado by Cigar Aficionado

    I thought that I'd liked this at first, especially because it is unlike many other scents. But over time, I had grown to dislike what I felt was a synthetic chemical scent which was not too fresh-smelling. To each his own, I suppose. :-o

    19 September, 2005

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    Unbound for Men by Halston

    At first, I didn't like the smell too much. However, I had tried it again recently, and loved it!! It definitely smells like Acqua di Gio, as one of my co-workers thought it was. But it is deeper, more citrus, and more memorable, IMO. A great bargain at the local discount stores. :-)

    19 September, 2005

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    Echo by Davidoff

    Such a delight wearing this one! It lasts all day with little change in texture, and it elicits compliments each time I wear it. I certainly can't figure out what all those synthetic notes are in this scent, but neverthless I place this one in my "never-fail" category of fragrances. This one and "Zino" are my two favorite Davidoff scents; I may check out his others in time.

    19 September, 2005

    Adepta's avatar

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    Sandalo by Etro

    Has been my favourite for years - classic, unobtrusive, with a touch of mystery. Maybe a more feminine interpretation of sandalwood. You can't go wrong with this one.

    19 September, 2005

    Adepta's avatar

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    L'Ombre dans L'Eau by Diptyque

    Don't know how this review ended up here: it is for Eau Trois, and I had posted it there! I can't figure out how to delete it.

    I have a suspicion - people from the US often are just unable to appreciate scents that are somewhat unusual, strong, or oriental - I think some of them have a strong dislike for pachouli, myrrh, incense and similar scents, which they identify - who knows why - whit bodlily odors. Could it have something to do with an exaggerated tendency to so-called hygiene, which is misinterpreted as the neutralization every trace of natural odor? That said, I think this perfume is excellent, even if not suited for all tastes. It starts as a fresh and aromatic herb mixture, which rapidly evovles to a pungent scent of resin, and finally takes on a scent of incense - but not the one you burn in sticks, the arabic one you buy in form of resinous grains - I think this is the myrrh comings out. Warm, oriental but sober, spiritual, well suited for autum and winter. More male perfume, probably, although I as a woman really love it.

    19 September, 2005 (Last Edited: 08 November, 2009)

    Adepta's avatar

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    L'Eau Trois by Diptyque

    I have a suspicion - people from the US often are just unable to appreciate scents that are somewhat unusual, strong, or oriental - I think some of them have a strong dislike for pachouli, myrrh, incense and similar scents, which they identify - who knows why - whit bodlily odors. Could it have something to do with an exaggerated tendency to so-called hygiene, which is misinterpreted as the neutralization every trace of natural odor? That said, I think this perfume is excellent, even if not suited for all tastes. It starts as a fresh and aromatic herb mixture, which rapidly evovles to a pungent scent of resin, and finally takes on a scent of incense - but not the one you burn in sticks, the arabic one you buy in form of resinous grains - I think this is the myrrh comings out. Warm, oriental but sober, spiritual, well suited for autum and winter. More male perfume, probably, although I as a woman really love it.

    19 September, 2005

    Adepta's avatar

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    Ofrésia by Diptyque

    I really fell in love with this one - it was March, and I was in the mood for spring, wanting new clothes, a new haircut, new scents... And this one did it: it is so green and vital... I never wear flowery perfumes, but this one can hardly be called flowery: it is just... like fresh and tender green new things growing from the moist soil in spring. Moving and inspiring.

    19 September, 2005

    calchic's avatar



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    Chantal Thomass by Chantal Thomass

    You must be a fan of exceedingly sugary scents in order to appreciate Chantal Thomass; I like sweet scents, vanilla scents, sweet powdery scents, fruit scents, you name it, but this is a little over the top even for me. At least that's the case in the initial application, which comes on like an tsunami of raspberry Kool-Aid and makes you honestly scratch your head in wonder as you ponder the connection between a childhood beverage and the very boudoir-esque, black lace-gartered bottle in which the actual fragrance is housed. There seems to be a very curious disconnect at this stage. Then, once the big, big berry !!blast!! simmers down, the fragrance moves into more identifiably coquettish territory with a combination of rose, powdery deep violet and almondy heliotrope. This stage is somewhat evocative of L'Artisan's Drole de Rose, excpet that instead of Drole's honey note, here you have - tomato? Yes, it's true, it's a discernible note in the Chantal Thomass composition, and incredibly bizarre as it may sound, when paired with very sweet ingredients (this is true in culinary preparations as well), tomato can take on a honeyed quality. Try a very sweet tomato jam if you ever get the chance and you'll see what I mean; tomato plus lots of sugar really has a honey-like aspect to it. Anyway...the Chantal is not as smooth or gentle as the Drole de Rose and has a harder edge to it, which is actually a bit of a plus if you're not thrilled with Drole's staying power. Chantal sticks around for quite a while, believe me. Basically, Chantal is Drole's big and slightly brassy sister, slugging down her Kool-Aid for all she's worth and going the distance, black garter and all!

    19 September, 2005

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    Pi by Givenchy

    Made for a man but I like it too - it's one of my husband's signature scents but I find myself craving it every so often as well, primarily due to its profusion of benzoin, one of my favorite of all notes. (I've been known to wear straight benzoin essential oil, that's how much I love it.) There is not a women's scent I can think of that features so much unadulterated (by florals, incenses, etc) benzoin as Pi, so I wear it occasionally - it's lovely in the dead of winter - to get my fix. The topnotes are masculine enough, IMO, to remind me that I am in fact wearing a men's scent; I get a decent dose of basil and pine needle in the opening, and both stick around through the progression of the scent into its sweet, warm woody-resiny heart/base. It's a classic scent, I think, so different from just about everything else out there (though if you've ever smelled S.T. Dupont Signature for Men - which includes basil, pepper, birch, cedar, citrus, incense and amber - it comes somewhat close to this) and utterly fantastically smelling on my husband, who pulls off warm and resiny scents very well. A very definite thumbs up.

    19 September, 2005

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    Tabac Blond by Caron

    Tabac Blond is probably the richest and most luxurious fragrance I’ve come across. It’s a thick, rich leather based fragrance. The leather mutes every other note in the fragrance. There is a glimmer of carnation that barely pokes its head out. Ironically enough, I don’t smell any Tobacco at all. The parfum of this lasts for days, and will never thin out on the skin. Considering its age, I find this one to smell rather modern and urban. It was definitely ahead of its time when it came out. This is a wonderful fragrance; in fact, for many on the board, it’s a holy grail.

    19 September, 2005

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    Shalimar by Guerlain

    Ah, Shalimar, one of the great Orientals of old. I have this in a couple different concentrations. It starts with a wonderful and short lived citrus dominated top. And then segues into a rich, creamy and sweet base. It’s very well balanced and very well made. This is one of the first modern Orientals. Shalimar is very well made, and surprisingly chic for its age. Anyone looking to try it should try the Parfum; it is so vastly superior to any other concentration.

    19 September, 2005

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    Bois Farine by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    Bois Farine is my favorite fragrance. It’s the most creative fragrance I have ever smelled. It’s made by one of the best perfumers this world has ever known. At first sniff, it smells a lot like peanut butter, but as it dries down, it smells more like flour. Flour or dough on a bed of dry white wood. This is, without a doubt, a gourmand fragrance, but it stretches the definition to an area we never think about. Flour, peanuts, fennel, and wood. It’s beyond amazing.

    19 September, 2005

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    Eau de Mûre by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Eau de Mure is interesting. I had a bottle, but swapped it away. It’s very similar to Mure et Musc, but it is much smoother, and the citrus notes aren’t as defined or prominent. It is also a bit more feminine than Mure et Musc or Mure et Musc Extreme, so I’d recommend testing it first. I swapped it because I didn’t feel I needed it when I already Mure et Musc Extreme.

    19 September, 2005

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    Fleurs des Comores by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    FdC is a very vanilla dominated scent. It’s mostly vanilla with a hint of jasmine. I don’t really care for it, because it’s pretty one dimensional and linear to me. For vanilla, I prefer L’Artisans Vanillia.

    19 September, 2005

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    Vocalise by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Vocalise is a nice fruity/floral fragrance by MPG. It’s a well blended; the fruit never really overpowers the floral notes and vice versa. With that being said, it’s a little watery and slightly timid. It doesn’t evolve much, and doesn’t really compare to most other fruity/floral fragrances in the MPG line.

    19 September, 2005

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    Or des Indes by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Or des Indes is one of my favorite fragrances by MPG. It’s incredibly French. This is along the lines of something Guerlain might have put out decades ago. It’s a very rich and very smooth fragrance. Rich woody notes with opoponax. Like the other reviewer said, it’s powdery, sensual, and warm. Great for either gender.

    19 September, 2005

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    Omnia by Bulgari

    Omnia is a scent that doesn’t get much mention on basenotes. I smell mostly sandalwood and chocolate. It wears pretty close to the skin; it’s not quite as full and lush as a sandalwood and chocolate blend could be, but is a nice fragrance.

    19 September, 2005

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