Fragrance Reviews from September 2005

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    Quelques Fleurs L'Original by Houbigant

    I bought this scent for a friend of mine and she was overwhelmed by it - leaving aside the usual signs of gratitude. Personally I am not completely sure of it, though my 'hidden side' contains three or four perfumes for women like Dark Rose and Ysatis (the marvelous feeling of going to bed with a feminine scent and imagining yourself as a duchess from Proust's world). Yes, it is very floral, no, it is not too sweet, but there is a kind of vague density in it, which makes it hard to find an anchor point for the enchanted nostrils.

    28 September, 2005

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    Dolce & Gabbana Pour Homme by Dolce & Gabbana

    good..but not for anyone below 30, and it is not as long lasting as the others say :)

    28 September, 2005

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    somenen


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    Obsession for Men by Calvin Klein

    i only tried it once. i was shocked to know that this cologne is around for 20 years, where have i been all these years? truly a classic

    28 September, 2005

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    Very Irrésistible for Men by Givenchy

    no no no... don't phunk with your hearts, smells like orange shell... what a pity on the big name like givenchy.. hard to believe that "pi" and this is from the same brand

    28 September, 2005

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    wicozani
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    Pierre Cardin Pour Monsieur by Pierre Cardin

    Sir, though I've not known you since 1972, is that Pour Monsieur from Cardin that you're wearing?
    "Why, yes, apparently I've been napping all these years and just yesterday received my first bottle of this classic. Judging by the sparkle in your eye, I'd say that you like it!"

    What a surprise indeed! Pour Monsieur is a very solid, discrete, masculine scent that hooks you with a brief citrus opening, before plunging immediately into the solid and harmonious middle notes. Chief among these, to my nose, are leather, carnation, and very soft sandalwood and patchouli. Another famous scent with leather and carnation (among many) is Habit Rouge, and PC PM is not terribly dissimilar, mainly lacking the orange note in addition to not being as sweet as Habit Rouge. Pour Monsieur is also more discrete than Habit Rouge, staying closer to the skin. I am very impressed, and more than a bit disappointed that I've waited so long to experience this one!

    Wicozani

    28 September, 2005

    calchic's avatar
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    Il Bacio by Borghese

    Pretty and completely feminine, Il Bacio somehow manages to escape the "just another fruity floral" doldrums, though I'm not sure how. It must be in the way the notes are calibrated; I notice that violet is one of the basenotes here, which is highly unusual to say the least. Also, the very large assortment of fruit notes - peach, plum, melon, passion fruit, pear - plus the fruity osmanthus are situated in the heart of the composition, not at the top. The florals, including honeysuckle, rose, jasmine, orchid and lily of the valley, do function as topnotes here and are atypically airy and clean. Il Bacio reminds me of a fresher verison of another fruity floral that I happen to find exceptional, First by Van Cleef and Arpels. They are both rich and somehow almost generous and benificent at heart, yet don't get bogged down into simple syrupy, sappy sweetness touched up with some spicy notes.

    29 September, 2005

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    Aromatics Elixir by Clinique

    I'm not a major cheerleader for many chypres; a lot of them can really hit me the wrong way and make me wonder how anyone could find them pleasing or even logical. (I'm still struggling to appreciate Mitsouko but I mean, really, moss and - peach? I just can't get my head wrapped around the melody of that somehow.) Aromatics Elixir, though, has always struck me as a little bit different because it doesn't seem to be trying to be something it's not. It's got a earthy-crunchy-hippy commune vibe going on, like Woods Hole, Massachusetts or Provincetown back in the early 70s, and doesn't go to any hugely great lengths to cover up that identity with notes that are "prettier," sweeter, more stylish or whatnot. It just is what it is and lyrical in its own way. It reminds me of a young James Taylor. I think that's cool. It's got a little fire (some spicy coriander, palmarosa - aka East Indian geranium, carnation, sandalwood), a little rain (cooling, mosit mosses) and the same certain kind of smoothness heard in the voice of old Baby James. Chamomile smooth, like a good herbal tea. And plenty of patchouli, too; again, it is a 70s kind of thing, but still plenty good these days, too.

    29 September, 2005

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    Émeraude by Coty

    Improbably, after all this time and all the stuff that's come and gone from my life since, I've managed to hang on to a bottle of this that I purchased in the mid 80s. From what I gather, Emeraude's been through many incarnations, bottle styles, strengths and possibly even reformulations, so I don't know where my particualr rendition falls into the spectrum. The bottle I have has that trademark crown-style top on and the juice itself is almost neon green, very similar to the color of Prescriptives Calyx. In terms of scent, this one starts out sharp - sharp! Whip-you-in-the-nose, somewhat old-school sharp in the manner of old Prince Matchabellis and such. Sharp and sweet; I think it's the orange-vanilla-sandalwood triple punch doing this, as I have other orange-vanilla scents that have a similar sharpness and know that some of them are also underscored with that spiciness of sandalwood. Back in the day, I used to avoid wearing this fragrance much for that very reason; I just didn't get it and my sense of smell was a little too untrained for that type of thing, I suppose. I'd just think, "this smells like grandma's perfumes" and put it back in the shoebox where I kept it. Today, I'm much more well rounded and can appreciate this type of opening for what it is! In addition to those three notes, Emeraude contains jasmine - which is quite sweet though not totally obnoxious - and some other spices and perhaps a touch of patchouli. It's a pretty good one; I don't know what the newer versions in the newer bottles are like, but this version is not bad at all.

    29 September, 2005

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    Ex'cla.ma'tion by Coty

    I'll exclaim all right - I truly dislike this fragrance and always have!!!! I must be in the minority since Exclamation has evidently been successful enough since its launch in the late 80s to have inspired a number of spin-offs, including Blush, Femme, Play, Noir...the list goes on. But in my experience, when Coty fragrances are good they are very, very good, but when they're bad they're awful - and Exclamation is just that. It's just so darned musty somehow; I think it's just an apricot note, but it comes off not as fruity-sweet but as apricot sour, that drink made with whiskey sour mix and apricot schnappes. It's just strange and off and very unpleasant. There is some amber-type powderiness in here that should, by all counts, cut this sour whiff somewhat but doesn't quite accomplish the task.

    29 September, 2005

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    Ici by Coty

    Ah Coty - for every unpleasant and offputting Exclamation or Dulce Vanilla you put out, you manage to turn around and launch something improbably beautiful! Case in point: Ici. Warm, sweet, creamy, almondy soft, a composition of magnolia, mimosa, cocoa, amber and musk. Far ahead of its time and truly genius, a genuinely lovely comfort scent. In fact, on the level of several premium fragrances including Burberry Brit and Lea St. Barth yet at a fraction of the price tag. Actually, I wish I had known how terrific Ici was before I'd gone ahead and bought those other two, because it lingers longer than the Brit and is less cloying and annoying than the Lea. Check this one out if you love gourmand fragrances.

    29 September, 2005

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    Ghost Myst by Coty

    Coty does some great, great stuff in the fragrance field, and also some not so great stuff; Ghost Myst is one of those not-so-great ones. I think the thing that rankles me the most about this fragrance is the misleading name. Ghost Myst is neither ghostly, as in ethereal and soft and shape-shifting, or misty, as in ethereal and soft and, well, hazy. Whether intended or not, what Ghost Myst smells like to me is a knock-off of Estee Lauder Pleasures. (They both did launch in 1995, and I know that Pleasures came out in late winter-early spring because I clearly recall wearing it then, so I suspect that Ghost Myst floated along somewhere later that year - probably as a holiday season launch.) Mainly a watery floral with a dash of fruit and some sandalwood, Ghost Myst suffers from that same case of sour/musty-itis that has always made another Coty scent, Exclamation, so very unpleasant to me. They share some common ground; Ghost Myst is marginally better than good old "Ex," but not by a wide margin!

    29 September, 2005

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    Crown Esterhazy by Crown Perfumery

    Crown Esterhazy is a special scent for those of us who are crazy about citrus, and I am so disheartened that it's basically becoming unnattainable as what little supply's left on the market disappears. Boo! This is one of the most inspired hesperides I've ever experienced; scintillating lemon topnotes swirl around a heart of mint, rose, orange blossom and rosemary. If you've ever had homemade lemonade with fresh mint stirred in, then you know how eye-openingly refreshing these two can be together, and this pairing forms the character of Esterhazy. It isn't too tart or brisk either and you don't get any "bracing aftershave" effect, thanks to the rounded qualities of the rose and a little bit of spicy cleanness from the orange blossom. I've never been able to pick up on the rosemary and that's not a problem; this composition is perfect the way it is. Almost splash-like, it's made to be applied liberally and frequently - but sadly, I'm down to hoarding the last little bit of what I have left of mine. Countess Esterhazy, whomever you are, you sahll be missed!

    29 September, 2005

    calchic's avatar
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    Crown Alpine Lily by Crown Perfumery

    Crown Alpine Lily comes close to being see-through, it's such a light-as-air rendition of lily of the valley. What's funny about lily of the valley, though, for all its delicacy - here more like ethereal fragility - is that it somehow manages to linger gently, patiently for hours. This fragrance is indeed odd in that regard; it is so light that in applying it, you just naturally assume that all traces of it will dissipate within, say, fifteen to twenty minutes. Yet two or three hours later, there it is, still sitting as quietly as a butterfly. This leads me to believe that the oils Crown Perfumery uses - or rather, used, as they're not producing anymore - to make its fragrances are more "true" than as is the usual case. I think many lily of the valley essences get a bit bolstered up in the translation to becoming elements of a fragrance and end up smelling more aggressive than they do in nature. Here seems more like the real deal. As for owning this scent, it's hard to get hold of nowadays and I only recommend trying to track it down if you're an absolute fiend for all things lily of the valley. Otherwise, sweet and endearing as it is, it's nothing that earth-shattering.

    29 September, 2005

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    Tanglewood Bouquet by Crown Perfumery

    Just the name of this spicym enchanting fragrance is enough to have you waltzing into the evening in a scene straight out of "The Sound of Music." Surprisingly, though, this fragrance is more about an oriental theme than anything else; the florals are ylang-ylang, chrysanthemum and mo-lu-hwa, a "fragrant Chinese flower," and the base is heavy with resins and spices, including benzoin, styrax, cinnaomn, nutmeg and vanilla. The peach and heliotrope notes mainly add more sweetness and a little light, but make no mistake - this is meant to be an exotic fragrance in its own right. It lingers for the longest time - goes on a bit sharp and alcohol-heavy but that fades away soon enough, leaving you with a very unique bouquet and again, that deep drydown. Richly golden in feeling, it's a stunning cool weather fragrance and one versatile enough to actually wear with jeans and sweaters; I find all the Crown fragrances I've used to be "properly British" in their own way but generally a little more lifestyle-geared than, say, some of the weightier stuff from the French houses. As with scents from Penhaglion, Floris and Crabtree and Evelyn, you don't necessarily feel like you're creating a jarring juxtaposition by sporting Crown's fragrances in more casual moments. Sadly, this wonderful scent as well as all of the Crown fragrances are no longer widely available, and seem to be becoming more scarce by the second. If you're curious about this "veddy British" read on an oriental scent, snap this one up ASAP if you ever see it anywhere!

    29 September, 2005

    calchic's avatar
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    Navy by Dana

    Another one of those puzzlingly named scents - sounds like it should be an understated, effortlessly elegant fragrance, like something along the lines of Bill Blass signature. Instead, it smells like a knock-off of Giorgio Beverly Hills and a scary one at that! Of course, the striped box - navy and white, versus Girogio's yellow and white, should be something of a giveaway, but still. Way, way too strong, intense and spicy-florally-heady to be called something like Navy. Not my type of scent, never was, never will be (same goes for Giorgio - ugh!), this fragrance consists of some citrus topnotes, heavy floral heartnotes and spice accents that include coriander and cinnamon. As with Giorgio, though, the description of notes doesn't really reveal the true character fo the composiiton. Everything here is balanced toward the heady and heavy. If you want something properly power-80s-like but in a good way, my advice is to skip the Navy, skip the Girogio and look into some Red instead.

    29 September, 2005

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    Ghost by Ghost

    Ghost is a gorgeous fragrance if given the chance to develop on your skin. It's one of those fragrances I'd keep trying on at the store and feeling confused about as the opening is so rose-intense. Roses, especially fresh young ones like the ones here, are nice but do not smell ghostly or ethereal or haunting or mysterious, as I fully expected and desired this scent to be. So I'd just shrug it off and move on to something else. Well, fortunately, one day I let it dry down to completion without passing such swift and unfavorable judgement on it, and was met with an entirely different impression. Once past the rosy stage, this indeed is a floating, cloud-like fragrance, a puff of slightly strange powder - more than a little similar to the odd powderiness of Herve Leger's fragrance, but with a twisting curl of smoke thrown in thanks to the incense. The notes used are not all that revealing in telling the story of what this really smells like; I can only recommend trying it and being patient with it. Transparent but not without its own kind of weight, not too sweet or traditionally powdery, genuinely moving and a bit emotional in its unfolding, Ghost does live up to its name after all. By the way: this fragrance is not to be confused with the genuinely scary, and not in a good way, Ghost Myst by Coty - a watery-sour imitation of Estee Lauder Pleasures.

    29 September, 2005

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    First by Van Cleef & Arpels

    First might end up being the only thing I ever own from Van Cleef and Arpels, but what a consolation prize! This fragrance is nothing short of magnificent and also holds many happy associations for me, so of course I just love it. It's categorized as an aldehydic floral - and sparkles on the topnotes, which are sweet and warm with nearly jam-like black currant and raspberry. The base is sweet, too, sweet and rich with amber, honey, oakmoss, vetiver, musk and civet. What saves this composition from going over the edge of the cloying-animalic-get-this-stuff-away-from-me waterfall, though, is a perfect middle layer of florals, and not just any old florals. There's a big tuberose perfect in its buttery splendor, a very clean and spicy narcissus and a really well done almost unsweet Turkish rose. A round of sweet, humid, overripe flowers would just have killed this scent, but the way the florals work here have the effect of elevating, differentiating and truly deliver First into a category of its own. This one's a real jewel of a fragrance, a top-grade diamond.

    29 September, 2005

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    L'Ombre dans L'Eau by Diptyque

    I just can't seem to hitch a ride on the Diptyque love train, and this widely loved Diptyque scent hammers that home for me. While not unpleasant - as in sour, musty, dusty, dour - like some rose scents can be, L'Ombre dans L'Eau smells so basic and straightforward to my nose that it just leaves me unstirred. Fresh, dewy young rose meets some green notes. Boom, the end. I don't get any black currant, no earthy notes, no nuance whatsoever beyond buds and leaves. I've really made an effort with Diptyque scents but they just don't cut it for me. Recently I happened across a shop that was selling a few Diptyque scents, including this L'Ombre, at dramatically discounted prices. I'm talking around $15 a bottle. And I STILL couldn't get myself to buy any of them; if that's not my subconscious telling me, "Calchic, you really hate these, you won't admit it but you really hate these," then I don't know what is!

    29 September, 2005

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    Olène by Diptyque

    Sharp yet soft - if that makes sense. Olene, composed of white florals headlined by wisteria and narcissus, has a whip-crack of some kind of sharpness to it. Whether it comes from the fragrance's alcohol content - all Diptyques I've ever tried have at least a moderate alcohol reek - or some of the spicier aspects of the narcissus or both, I'm not sure. But it's there, as is the honey-plush heat from what has got to be either honeysuckle or jasmine or both. Gardenia and tuberose - I think they may be in Olene as well, particularly the tuberose which adds least a little of its singular clean-dry-butteriness to the mix. Not much, though. Straight white florals are straight white florals to me and Olene's no exception. I hate to say it but *yawn* another non-starter from Diptyque for me, too predictable, too plain. I am giving it a neutral, however, because it's a pretty one in spite of its simple nature.

    29 September, 2005

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    Philosykos by Diptyque

    Regardless of what one thinks of other fragrances from the Diptyque line, EVERYone loves Philosykos, right? Right? Wrong! Argh, what is it with Diptyques that causes me to block on them so badly and miss what so many others seem to be enjoying?! When it comes to figs, I'm a L'Artisan Premier Figieur kind of girl, yet open to other interpretations of this stellar fruit, which I've kind of been in love with since childhood. And Premier, like Philosykos, is green fig, not ripe fig, not the honeyish variety you find in other scents such as Balenciaga Cristobal. So I'm okay with the green fig thing. Philosykos, though, is just TOO green, too thin and - nail in the coffin - weirdly sweet in the drydown, a little powdery-sickly sweet and so not what I think of fig as being. Drat! I had a chance recently to buy a bottle of this at such a good price; a boutique near me was going out of business and selling off a few Diptyque SKUs. Cut-rate Philosykos was right there in front of me and I still couldn't/wouldn't take the bait. I realized from that experience that Diptyques and I will never see eye-to-eye.

    29 September, 2005

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    Té by Beth Terry Creative Universe

    A strange green tea scent that bizarrely tends toward the broth-like. The weak green tea note here stands no chance against the forces of celery, clove and grapefruit, which band together to form an aroma so much like homemade chicken broth bubbling away on the back burner, it's uncanny. The remaining notes of bergamot and ylang ylang don't even bother to phone it in - they're just nowhere to be found. On the very few occasions I've worn this fragrance, the only favorable reaction I got to it was from my dog; he followed me around sniffing the air the way dogs do when they think you've got a food snack stashed away in your pocket. Truly strange! I stubbornly hold on to the bottle I have of this - I got it many years ago in a trade - strictly because it's so novel. Not wearable at all in any way, shape or form but like a carnival side show act: step right up and see the amazing chicken soup cologne!

    29 September, 2005

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    Mare by Beth Terry Creative Universe

    One of the best true, organic-like marine fragrances ever - this and Calypso Marine are the only two I've ever smelled that avoid taking the "sun tan lotion" route to evoke being at the beach. (That being said, the shockingly good Beach Smells by Smell THIS is also remarkably "at the beach" real but has just enough of a cocoa butter note to disqualify it from being all-natural smelling.) Mare smells exactly like sitting in the dunes watching the waves hit the shore, and I'm not sure how it accomplishes that with the notes involved. There's the light iodine essence of sea salt, that much is identifiable. But precisely how the other two notes, avocado and ginger lily (this is a very simple scent) manage to conjure being shore-side is a mystery to me. The avocado is both fruity (in the same way that olive oil can be fruity - not literally fruit-like, but round and sweet) and buttery, which perhaps does conjure cocoa butter after all, just a little tiny bit. And the ginger lily is crisp and clean. Somehow, the workings of these three elements together create magic. The scent literally smells as though it's been warmed by the sun when you apply it to the skin. Hands-down, an awesome marine scent that's great for women and men alike.

    29 September, 2005

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    Luce by Beth Terry Creative Universe

    Nice for a man - sort of a niche perfumer's take on Monsieur de Givenchy - but Luce is not for the ladies, or at least this lady. Lavender, lemongrass, ginger and musk add up to a definitively masculine scent here, a nice one though somehow lacking in that little *spark* that it seems to need. Something is missing and it's hard to say what; the ginger should be adequate to give Luce a hit of the spice it calls for but somehow doesn't deliver. This one rarely gets worn around my house - my husband seems to find it as basically unexciting and blah as I do. If you want to get a Beth Terry scent that's failsafe in its uniqueness, go for Mare. I haven't tried Vita yet so I don't know how it ranks in the Creative Universe universe, but Mare is a truly genius fragrance. Luce just is not.

    29 September, 2005

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    Apple Fantasy by Body Fantasies

    I don't believe anyone's ever accused apple of being an overwhelmingly exciting or interesting note; it's a nice note, it's a perfectly likeable one, but it has not much in the way of surprises to offer. Unfortunately, the attempt to add a little life to plain old just apple doesn't go over all that well in this Body Fantasies fragrance. Here, apple is paired with a rather assertive pineapple. Problem is, it's not a fully ripe pineapple and it smells just a bit too tart - which overwhelms the apple as well as the vanilla note, which I really can't smell in the mix. The cleanish musk base is there and it's okay, but as a whole this is one of my least favorite scents of the generally shockingly good Body Fantasies lineup. Worth checking out if you utterly worship apple scents but otherwise - pass straight through to the line's Cotton Candy Fantasy, Fresh White Musk Fantasy or Vanilla Fantasy.

    29 September, 2005

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    Cucumber Melon by Body Fantasies

    Smells just like it sounds - crisp and clean cuke, lots of honeydew melon. If you like these kinds of super-refreshing combinations, this is a good one. Super original? No. But you can have plenty of fun doing layering experiments with this fragrance without having to be concerned about playing around with expensive stuff. Try wearing this over a sandalwood body lotion or even with a dab of sandalwood essential oil; you'll get a heavenly combo that smells like a cool summer evening spent sitting out on the porch, watching fireflies, burning a little incense to keep the mosquitos away. It also blends well with fruity fragrances, particular summery fruits like peach. And if you get really daring, try it with the peach AND the sandalwood - it comes fairly close to approximating the very lovely signature scent of Todd Oldham, which contains three of the four of these notes (but with kiwi instead of the melon.)

    29 September, 2005

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    Altaro by Body Shop

    Altaro is the oriental-type entry in the "invent your scent" range. It's basically okay but bottom line - if it's an oriental you seek, you might as well go for the real thing (take your pick, from a classic like Vol de Nuit or Shalimar all the way to the newest variations on Opium) because this is just a little too anemic to do the classification justice. It tries hard but is just lacking the body, the substance, the oomph that makes orientals so indelible. There is spiciness here, and the requisite vanillic sweetness, but the basic absence of floral midnotes is what makes you realize just why florals are such a key part of an oriental composition. It's not as though they're the stars of the show, but the supporting roles they play are so key. An adequate dose of rose in Altaro would have made all the difference, I believe. Add to that a jarring opening, one that errs on the side of harshness with a Dentyne-esque blast of chemically cinnamon, and you have a scent not worth purchasing in my book. I'll save my money for some of the range's other better selections.

    29 September, 2005

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    Aztique by Body Shop

    Next to Amorito, Aztique's my favorite fragrance in the quite clever and generally well rendered "Invent your Scent" line. While super-fruity scents aren't always my thing, this one's got an attitude to it and it's a lot of fun. There are bananas and peaches mixed in with lime zest and some pear; the whole thing smells like white sangria or being in San Miguel d'Allende, a fantastic little artistic-colony kind of place down in Mexico. Various florals plus sandalwood, amber, light woods and musk support this exotic fruit cocktail in the nicest way possible; they keep the mood going without taking over or taking away. This is really good stuff - sort of nil on the staying power but that's not a shocker, all things considered. For a cute little scent like this - which I also plan on giving as a gift - that's acceptable and even desirable in a way, as the upside of walking around smelling like a fruit bowl does wear a touch thin after a while.

    29 September, 2005

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    Chymara by Body Shop

    Within the "Invent your Scent" range, Chymara is considered the floriental fragrance, a designation I would probably take issue with if I were a big fan of "real" florientals. Like the range's Altaro, a take on oriental, Chymara is floriental light, if even that. The proper elements are mostly there, but this lacks a truly resonant base that gives a floriental its body. Of course, I understand that the Body Shop isn't looking to produce the fragrance world's next Coco or Narcisse Noir, as it's just not that type of brand! It's just that this fragrance, to me, has a neither-here-nor-there feeling to it; it starts out very strong and every bit as heady as a true floriental with a heavy presence of spiced fruit, but very rapidly fades on me to a light-ish fruity-floral with quite a bit of clean musk. Generally, this is a nice scent that bears some passing resemblance to some of the lighter fruity-florals from the big houses, Lancome Attraction and Escada Magnetism being among them. The notes are top - mandarin, pineapple, berries/heart - muguet, rose, lilies/base - wood, cedar, praline, musk and amber.

    29 September, 2005

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    Zinzibar by Body Shop

    If you like very effusive spice scents, this is a good one. Zinzabar is loaded with ginger - it's in the top and heartnotes - bolstered with citruses, pepper, cardamom, cedarwood and sandalwood. There's some counter-balancing freesia in there, which helps to offset the strength of the spice blend, but I still find this scent to tend just a bit too far to the side of masculine. It's from the presence of the pepper plus the absence of one or two sweeter, smoothing notes - like, for example, the vanilla in the base of Origins' Ginger Essence. And the bright red of the bottle telegraphs "cinnamon" to me, so when I've tried this on and gotten mostly ginger it's been a momentary surprise/letdown. I've elected to pass this one over in favor of the Body Shop's outstanding pink pepper fragrance, which is warm and sweet and spicy and amazing and also comes in EDP AND oil forms, so you can layer both for a long-lasting effect.

    29 September, 2005

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    Minteva by Body Shop

    Minteva is one of the closest matches I've ever smelled to one of my ultimate favorite fragrances of all time, L'Eau de L'Artisan. Mint, basil, lemon - both have them, and both smell astonishingly fresh and alive. Minteva replaces the fresh cut grass in L'Eau with some green-smelling florals - peony and not-too-ripe white lily - as well as a touch of spice, but the botanical feeling is just as exhilerating in this as it is in the L'Artisan. I love these kinds of fragrances and have room in my heart for both brands' renditions - though the pricing on the Body Shop version makes it an awfully tempting permanent alternative! Minteva's lasting power is so-so, not as good as it is with the L'Eau de L'Artisan - which itself is not the most pronounced, long-lasting fragrance in the world. We're definitely talking summer scents here, light and breezy and very natural. So buy and apply accordingly!

    29 September, 2005

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