Fragrance Reviews from January 2006

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    Ken_Russell's avatar

    Romania Romania

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    Quartz pour Homme by Molyneux

    Very puristic classic scent yet not easy to define. A little earthy scent almost reminding of stones(tough most stones are odourless). Cooling, discreet, rather intellectual and conservative than playful and eccentric. Rather different and clearly a touch more classy if compared to nowadays trends in male fragrance.

    28 January, 2006

    Ken_Russell's avatar

    Romania Romania

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    Tsar by Van Cleef & Arpels

    A very opulent scent, just like its name and designer. Smells expensive, reminding of a very distinguished sort of gentlemanly elegance.

    28 January, 2006

    Ken_Russell's avatar

    Romania Romania

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    XXL by Daniel Hechter

    A nice and fresh scent, but nothing more than this. Indecisive, just a combination of very neutral and unspectacular tones that lead to nowhere. After the daring and powerfull Caractere, this one is supposedly more modern yet misunderstandig modernity as inexpressive and synthetically artificial. Slightly aquatic and a touch too sweet to be seen as masculine.
    Still not necessarily a bad scent.

    28 January, 2006 (Last Edited: 26 April, 2008)

    Ken_Russell's avatar

    Romania Romania

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    Joint by Roccobarocco

    Stylish creation smelling like a crossover of half Chevignon Brand and the classic 4711. Very aromatic, loads of Mediterranean herbs, chypre, sandal-and cedarwood,lavender and lemon notes. A groundbreaking revival of old school luxuriant scnts, exhaling a definitive, yet sophistcatedly subtle and classy masculinity.

    28 January, 2006

    Otto's avatar

    Bermuda Bermuda

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    M7 Fresh by Yves Saint Laurent

    Thumbs Way Way Way up for me for this wonderful fragrance. I really love citrus scents and that probably is because where I live gets very hot and humid. A good friend of mine found this gem in a frag. store in New York and that was their last one...Well I am on the look out for more because this will stay a summer keeper for me....

    28 January, 2006

    Words's avatar

    United States United States

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    Crave by Calvin Klein

    People have to understand that there are scents out there like CK Crave that are targeted for a younger audience. For Males 16-25 years of age this will do the job. It has a real tropical fruit cocktail thing going on here. I dont care much for the spray mechanism though, hard to get a good stream sometimes.

    28 January, 2006 (Last Edited: 10th March, 2010)

    CASunshine's avatar



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    Eden by Cacharel

    Eden is a heavy oriental fragrance. The patchouli overpowers everything else. Although I can tolerate this on others, if I wear it, it gives me a headache. Eden does smell exotic and sexy in the bottle, though. I really wanted to like it.

    29 January, 2006

    CASunshine's avatar



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    Carlos Santana for Women by Carlos Santana

    Fragrance notes: "Carlos Santana For Women blends exotic fruits with subtle florals and rounds out the scent with soft, sensuous musk to create a seductive, warm fragrance. Notes include Neroli Flower, California Pear Skin, Cassis, Coconut Water, Freesia, Japanese Plum, Calla Lily Accord, Iris, Chocolate, Musk, Sandalwood." All I can say is yummy!

    29 January, 2006

    Shycat's avatar

    United States United States

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    Bluebell by Penhaligon's

    Yes, it does make me smile! Over and over again through out the day.
    top: galbanum

    middle: cyclamen, muguet, jasmine, rose

    base: clove, cinnamin

    I hestitate to include the notes, but they are on the Pennhaligon's web page. It really brings nothing to mind except kneeling in the cool springtime to catch a whiff of the first bulbs of spring. The fresh greenness is uplifting and though there isn't a hyacinth note listed, that's exactly, and I mean Exactly, what it smells like...

    29 January, 2006

    DonInTheDesert's avatar



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    Latitude Sport by Olivier de Kersauson

    Tabacaceous, very similar to Ralph Lauren Romance Silver. Good sillage and very long lasting. I like it.

    29 January, 2006

    emmaa88's avatar



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    Hugo Pure Purple by Hugo Boss

    I work with perfume, and I smelt this just today. I watched people's reactions as they sampled this and each was distinctly different to mine! Most loved it, but I'm not sure about the marzipan. When I didn't know what the perfume contained, I liked it a lot more - now all I can think of when I smell it is sickly Christmas cakes. Although interesting, it's not for me.

    29 January, 2006

    Joshaugustt's avatar



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    Salvador Dali pour Homme by Salvador Dali

    It took me a few trys to finally decide that I really LIKE this cologne. It's not for everyone as it has a stand out scent. But after giving it a fair try, I really do love this scent. It's fresh and unique and has a powdery dry down. It's worth a try...or two! Joshaugustt

    29 January, 2006

    Legends's avatar



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    Polo Black by Ralph Lauren

    Its interesting, its a lot of things but its certainly not black. I like polo blue and this cologne is the same idea as polo blue but its a lot more "manly" in a sense. In my opinion its a lot better than polo blue.

    29 January, 2006

    paranoidandroid's avatar



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    Arabie by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    Very very gourmand. I got a lot of dates and other dried fruits with spices with this one. I used to make a date and walnut cake - and one of the things to do in the recipe was to chop dates and soak them in a tablespoon of warm water and then mix them with walnuts before adding them to the cake batter. Arabie reminds me of that mixture - nutty, dry-fruity and just really sweet and gourmand. This is a very intense perfume that should be tested before you buy it. Thankfully - it works wonders on me.

    29 January, 2006

    scentemental's avatar



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    Aqua Allegoria Lavande Velours by Guerlain

    The lavender note that dominates Guerlain’s classic men’s fragrance *Mouchoir de Monsieur* for a short period--about 10 to 15 minutes into the drydown--is basis for the lavender note accord of *Aqua Allegoria Lavande Velours* created by master Guerlain perfumer Jean-Paul Guerlain himself. It’s as if he took the lavender note of *Mouchoir de Monsieur* and built another fragrance around it. I think it is one of the best instances of what aromachemistry can do in the hands of a great master. It’s a simple accord of lavender and sandalwood with a whisper of violet. For a lavender-based fragrance it has extraordinary longevity. It’s not an easy achievement to get lavender to last and to last with intensity, but Jean-Paul Guerlain has done just that here with both natural ingredients and high-quality aroma chemicals that not only approximate their natural counterparts but also manage to extend them over time and space in a way Nature can’t.

    29 January, 2006

    scentemental's avatar



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    Bellagio for Men by Fragluxe

    Fantastic stuff. *Bellagio Uomo* starts off with a classic Italian citrus opening that reminds me in part of the exquisite opening of *Signoricci 2*. Very quickly it settles into a citrusy muted marine note with a salty metallic edge. At this point it reminds me of a very successful cross between *Acqua di Giò Pour Homme* and *Eau de Rochas* (for women). If it lasted more than half an hour, it would be an extraordinary fragrance, but it doesn’t and just vanishes into thin air. What a pity. Certainly worth the half hour though.

    29 January, 2006

    scentemental's avatar



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    Boucheron pour Homme by Boucheron

    UPDATING REVIEW. UPDATING REVIEW. UPDATING REVIEW. UPDATING REVIEW. UPDATING REVIEW. UPDATING REVIEW. UPDATING REVIEW.

    29 January, 2006 (Last Edited: 15 November, 2009)

    scentemental's avatar



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    Gendarme by Gendarme

    *Gendarme* is the cleanest and freshest of the four Gendarmes (*Gendarme*, *Gendarme V*, *Gendarme 20 EDP*, and *Gendarme Green EDP*). With a 12% concentration of perfume oils, which technically qualifies it as an EDP, it’s the original, magical Gendarme accord. It’s an entirely uncluttered fragrance and has even been called an “anti-fragrance”. Adjectives often used to describe it are "clean", “light,” and “fresh”. In many ways it’s an ineffable, understated, and unobtrusive accord, hence vague and abstract adjectives like “clean,” “light,” and “fresh” come naturally to mind. Here’s a description of it from the official Gendarme website itself: “Green with citrus and verbena top notes. Herbal with a dry-down of jasmine and thyme, bound to a hint of leather. A full 12% oil blend for a compelling long last that won't overpower the room.” Don’t look for any one of the elements mentioned to dominate or even to stand out. I have never been able to single out any of the notes. It’s a unique, tight, ineffable but very pleasing accord; these qualities are the basis of its appeal and its mystery.

    Finally, *Gendarme* is one of those fragrance for which “olfactory habituation” happens very quickly. Many wearers claim they can't smell the fragrance a few minutes after application. Also, none of the fragrances in the Gendarme line produces significant sillage, mainly in part because the ingredients are mostly natural and don’t have the sustained scent producing output of aromachemicals. However, if your body heat is activated, the highly concentrated natural oils in the fragrance and on your skin are also activated and in turn the scent is released. You might not be able to smell the fragrance because of olfactory habituation, but others certainly will when they are up close. Actually, the same can be said for all of the Gendarmes. These particular quirks of *Gendarme*, and all of the Gendarme fragrances in general, help to explain why wearers of Gendarme fragrances frequently claim that they can't smell the fragrance a few minutes after application but are regularly told by others hours later that they smell “nice and clean”.

    29 January, 2006

    scentemental's avatar



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    Gendarme V by Gendarme

    *Gendarme V*, with its high concentration of natural perfume oils (15% in this case), is typical of Gendarme fragrances in general. It’s clean and casual and wears close to the skin, and, like the original *Gendarme*, it has a pretty tight accord, but it’s certainly also a more complex scent. It manages to use ylang ylang in a way that I haven't seen used in either women's or men's fragrances. Ylang ylang tends to have a sickly sweet, fecund, heady note that is perilously close to smelling like the flower itself has begun to decay, a note that is very hard to tame. Not this ylang ylang. It's as if the most ethereal and pleasing fragrance characteristic of the ylang ylang was gently removed and blended optimally into the *Gendarme V* accord. An unsuccessful use of ylang ylang, in my opinion, can be seen in Damien Bash's *Lucifer No.3*, where from the outset the ylang ylang crowds out the other elements and continues to do so right throughout the drydown. The use of ylang ylang in *Lucifer No.3* is somewhat crudely handled, and no special care is taken to mitigate that heady, fecund, cloying note found in the flower. This is the ultimate success of *Gendarme V*. It is an entirely harmonious accord with, at its center, one of the most potentially inharmonious and inhospitable of flowers.

    I spoke to Topper Schroeder one time, the guy behind the Gendarme line–a very charming and affable, laid-back guy, by the way–who told me, when I put it to him that he had done wonders with ylang ylang, that it was in large part due to its being blended successfully with “a very expensive vetiver”. Can't say I can really smell the vetiver, but again that’s precisely *Gendarme V's* success–it’s blending.

    *Gendarme V* doesn't change much from initial application to final drydown. The accord is tight, harmonious, and balanced, and, of course, one of a kind. You’ll be smelling yourself all the time when you apply this, and even though it wears close to the skin, you’ll be aware of it, as will others. It’s a feel good, uplifting, casual scent that’s dreamy, California dreamy, in fact. One final point about *Gendarme V* is that it sometimes manifest a stronger citrus note than the other two Gendarmes which is definitely carried by what is a synthetic civet note. It can sometime surprise the wearer in this way. When it does so, it develops a slightly sharp, citric, animalic note on top of the ylang ylang/vetiver accord. Not unpleasant but it can be surprising because it's not always present. Definitely, the most interesting and complex of all the Gendarmes in my book.

    29 January, 2006

    scentemental's avatar



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    Habit Rouge by Guerlain

    What follows is a comparative review of *Habit Rouge* EDC, EDT, EDP, and Light (a.k.a. Légère) versions.

    The EDC is the original formulation which tends to emphasize the citrus spice accord throughout the entire drydown. It's definitely the most sophisticated and the most complex of the four. The animalic/vanillic accord is present throughout but never brazenly so like it is in the EDT. The EDT, on the other hand, primarily emphasizes the animalic/vanillic accord from the outset. It’s bold and makes no apologies for being so. If the EDC is the more formal and demure of the two, the EDT is the equivalent of EDC but with the tie loosened, the shirt open, and on the prowl. With the EDT, there is a brief citrus opening and then the citrus element all but disappears after a minute. There is also a far less complex and persistent interplay of the spices with the citrus and animalic/vanillic elements than you get in the EDC. The EDT is, however, the most potent and straight up form of the characteristic *Habit Rouge* animalic/vanillic accord and, if your nose thinks so, a beautiful and beguiling one at that.

    The EDP, interestingly enough, opens with a stronger, but smoother, primarily neroli dominated top and middle notes and paradoxically with a decidedly more muted animalic/vanillic accord. With the EDP version, the signature *Habit Rouge EDT* animalic/vanillic accord is not as prominent throughout the drydown and all but disappears well into the drydown when the agarwood makes a show and blends with it to the point where the animalic/vanillic accord’s presence becomes almost liminal. Certainly one finds oneself catching whispers of it in the drydown, but it’s the agarwood note which dominates the final drydown in a very cozy and yielding way and acts as a excellent basenote substitute for the vanilla predominant drydown of the EDT. If you’re looking for a stronger version of the EDT—and why anyone would want one is beyond me—you won’t find it here. The EDP is its own animal but with less animal in it and not more. It is, however, EDP strength and lasts anywhere from 16 to 24 hrs, at least on this wearer. If you find the agarwood note in Yves Saint Laurent’s *M7* overbearing, you’ll love it in the *Habit Rouge EDP*; it’s smoother, less medicinal, less smoky, and more integrated into the overall accord.

    The newest incarnation of *Habit Rouge*, *Habit Rouge Light* (a.k.a. Légère), has a very subdued animalic/vanillic accord throughout with a prominent but very fresh top and middle note accord underpinned by a very sophisticated neroli note. In this sense the Light version is more of a reworking of the EDP than it is of the EDT or EDC for that matter since there is little to no spice in it. The neroli note in both the EDP and Light versions is never sharp, prickly, or unsettling as it is in say Rochas *Lui*. This neroli note in *Lui* is the one which makes people say it smells like *Habit Rouge*. While there certainly is a similarity, I find the neroli note in Rochas *Lui* taxing; to my nose it’s prickly and officious. Not so in the Light version. The benchmark for a more sophisticated aroma-chemical neroli note is, of course, Thierry Mugler's *Cologne*, and now, it seems, *Habit Rouge EDP* and *Habit Rouge Light*. As noted before, throughout the drydown of the Light version, the animalic/vanillic accord is a reticent presence, barely perceptible except for those who look for it. It's there, but on a much more liminal level than the EDP or the EDC, whereas, it’s the main feature in the EDT drydown. On the whole, the Light version is a very successful modulation of the EDP. This is quite a remarkable achievement when one thinks of it. It’s very easy to overlook the individuality of each one of these incarnations if one compares them hastily to what one is used to. If anyone of these were created without the others existing, many of us would be excited about them. It's hard to see things afresh, but all of the various *Habit Rouges* are truly innovative and a tribute to the original, seminal EDC, which, when all is said and done, remains my favorite–not that the others are very far behind.

    29 January, 2006

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    Messe de Minuit by Etro

    *Messe de Minuit* is a strange one. I have a very strong visceral reaction to it. I find it disgusting and very odd, but, all together, utterly compelling and familiar. In many ways, it’s like a Gothic monument, beautiful in its pointed ugliness, and it’s like those gargoyles one finds adorning such monuments, hideous, imposing creatures from another world, dangerous, lurking, and all the while one is strangely drawn to their otherness, to the shadow, to the other self. Good and evil, light and dark, body and soul, sin and redemption, these are the dualities *Messe de Minuit* understands and embodies. It’s a Catholic universe, and I swear it smells exactly like the old, musty, dank little Catholic churches one finds everywhere in Europe. Churches whose scent is the accretion of incense, age, and the blood, sweat, and tears of their parishioners as they struggled with their passions and their yearning for metaphysical certainty. It’s hard to maintain faith in this one; I am still trying.

    29 January, 2006

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    Castile by Penhaligon's

    A fine, fresh, and true neroli fragrance in which the neroli note is not cloying nor sickly-sweet dominant as it can be in many neroli-based scents. It has the freshness and lightness of orange flower water, which is one of its middle-note ingredients. The other middle note, rose, makes its appearance very quickly into the drydown but remains muted and is integrated well with the predominant neroli accord, which, interestingly enough, once the top notes have dissipated, begins to smell sweet like orange blossom honey. The base notes of Woods and Musk remain very muted as the top and middle notes work themselves out well into the drydown. The heavy bloom in May, white-blossom brides among the fragrant groves warmed by a honeyed light.

    29 January, 2006

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    Ungaro I by Ungaro

    Flayed strips of sodden mossy bark, dark purple twig-rich earth, and the last breath of flowers held in the huge hands of slowly moldering, motley-colored, waxy autumnal leaves, and in that forest, everywhere, one senses the reverberation of a cool, detached, and moist metallic patchouli echo returning through the trees. The color of the bottle, a deep rich, vibrant brownish red. The fragrance, a nonpareil.

    29 January, 2006

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    Mare by Beth Terry Creative Universe

    *Mare* has the purest, most authentic marine note of any of the more popular marine-note fragrances currently on the market, all of which seem tricked up in comparison. *Mare* is pure sea salt in some ways. Also, it has a very simple and minimalist note structure: sea salt note, avocado note, and ginger lily note. It’s really a masterpiece of simplicity and elegance. The ginger lily gives it a beautiful, very quiet, final white flower basenote that begins to develop well into the drydown when the avocado note abates the sea salt note by adding to it a creaminess that rounds out the accord beautifully in concert with the final ginger lily note as the sharp, brackish sea salt note begins to recede like the tide going out. A word of warning: the initial sea salt top note is a little jarring at first, but I think that’s part of the fragrance’s appeal. Salt smells strange, otherworldly almost, and since this fragrance has one of the truest marine notes of all, one would expect that note to have a strange, brackish quality to it. Finally, what I also really like about *Mare* is the experience of how it develops over time. It’s one of those fragrances that makes you aware that not all great fragrances have to smell exquisite right out of the bottle. Some things are certainly worth waiting for and waiting for (and experiencing) *Mare’s* drydown is one of them.

    29 January, 2006

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    Gendarme 20 by Gendarme

    With a 20% concentration of perfume oils, *Gendarme 20* is clearly an EDP. To my nose, however, Gendarme 20* is still simply *Gendarme* with a greater percentage of perfume oils overlaid with a beautiful, no, actually, an exquisite lavender note, which, unfortunately like all true and exquisite lavender notes, doesn't last very long; it's really a top note. This is the floral note people have been taking about; although, since lavender is a herb and not a flower, it’s really a herbal note. The lavender is an interesting twist, and, like all the ingredients in the Gendarme range, it is a very pure and expensive version of lavender. Surprisingly, even at 20% perfume oils, *Gendarme 20 EDP* doesn’t really produce more sillage, but, like other Gendarmes, don’t let that fool you.

    29 January, 2006

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    Element-of-Surprise by Beth Terry Creative Universe

    *Element of Surprise* begins with a persistent honey-like white tea note not unsimilar to *Bvlgari Eau Parfumée au Thé Blanc*; although, *Element of Surprise* tends to be a little soapier and more tenacious than the *Bvlgari Eau Parfumée au Thé Blanc*. The tea note is interlaced with a very Mediterranean (pure, clean, and natural) Lemon/Lime note. The background of Jasmine gives amplitude to white tea note and contrast to the citrus notes. An uplifting fragrance. Simple, elegant, and very casual at the same time.

    29 January, 2006

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    Dia Man by Amouage

    i dont know if my nose has something wrong in itself but i cant find anything interesting in this frag except the bottle and i dont know if i wish to spend my money just for a bottle ,i gave ita second chance but i still dont like it at all

    30th January, 2006

    FroFro's avatar



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    Anaïs Anaïs by Cacharel

    Wore this for a while when I was around 17 or 18, and loved it. Recently decided to give it a whirl. Personally, prefer the body wash, lotion and deodarant spray rather the EDP (which I find to be a tad strong), but a very nice, very classic scent. Have to admit, though - makes me extremely nauseous if overapplied.

    30th January, 2006

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    Obsession by Calvin Klein

    Adore it. I have to say, this one requires certain skills - it should be applied sparingly (more so than other perfumes), but when worn correctly - killer scent that men go bonkers over. The Pied Piper has nothing on me! Always have it in my wardrobe since age 19, and no matter how many times I stray (and I do, a LOT), always come back to it.

    30th January, 2006

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    Eternity by Calvin Klein

    Not one of my favorites. I don't feel as strongly about it as the previous reviewer, JimInCO, however. I used it for a very short period when it just came out, and it never really "took", nor did any of it's "modifications", perhaps except for "Eternity Summer", which I found to be quite pleasant.

    30th January, 2006

    Showing 1081 to 1110 of 1141.