Fragrance Reviews from October 2007

    Showing 661 to 690 of 788.
    JaimeB's avatar
    JaimeB
    United States United States

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    Eau de Lierre by Diptyque

    I find this vaguely reminiscent of Bond No. 9 *Gramercy Park*. On the whole, I think I prefer this one, and it's a lot less expensive, too. The ivy note is a kind of linear theme here, but the other ingredients, the cyclamen and the ambergris in particular, give this a lift on the one hand and an anchor on the other. As far as green scents go, this is a pretty good one. The other Diptyque green scent, *Virgilio*, is much more herbal; *Eau de Lierre* is smoother, a little less harsh. I think I prefer it to *Virgilio* as well.

    26 October, 2007 (Last Edited: 05 April, 2008)

    Joe_Frances's avatar
    Joe_Frances
    United States United States

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    Safari for Men by Ralph Lauren

    With a lot of the Polo/RL signature elements, this is the best of the bunch, and a rich, smooth, "grown up" Polo fragrance. Nice in its way, in fact, Safari is a weigh station on the way to something more mature and more personal to the wearer. But for what it is, a very pleasant weigh station, it is a fine thing.

    26 October, 2007

    Mannie's avatar
    Mannie


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    Sander for Men by Jil Sander

    I don't understand how a perfumer of the calibre of Jacques Cavallier can be so uneven and erratic in his performance as such, as a perfumer. While his L'eau D'Issey and Bvlgari pour homme are distinctive and exquisite, this one, Sander, comes as a dissapointment. No individuality, or distinctiveness, no class, it's gray and opaque.

    26 October, 2007

    markc's avatar
    markc
    United States United States

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    Black by Kenneth Cole

    This is one I thought I liked until finding basenotes. After trying hundreds more, this now seems pretty inferior. It is a fresh clean smell with just a bit of suede. Easy for me to see now that this is not special or unique at all. I do get decent longevity, in contradiction to many of the reviews. Not bad, just not distinctive.

    26 October, 2007

    Sloan's avatar
    Sloan
    United States United States

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    Miel de Bois by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    One of my favorite things is to draw patterns and designs using drips of honey on my lover's body. Miel de Bois is exactly how her skin smells after I have licked all traces of the honey from her sweetly scented, slightly sticky skin. The scent of raw, unrefined, honey mixed with skin and saliva.

    26 October, 2007

    madridbatabidd's avatar
    madridbatabidd
    Spain Spain

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    Alegria Hombre by Adolfo Dominguez

    Ozone, aquatic notes,ginger, lavender,green apple, mint and cedar.
    Veryyyy clean, very masintream, yes, but would be my chosenone for a day by day innofensive fresh perfume, for the price you smell ,cheap, chic, nice and clean!.

    26 October, 2007

    madridbatabidd's avatar
    madridbatabidd
    Spain Spain

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    Azzaro Now Men by Azzaro

    Include frosted metal, cardamom, tea, violet, green notes,rose oxide, floated wood, letaher, lichen and amber.
    Probably suit modern niche guys from 20 to 32 years old.
    I really like synthetic myself.
    That one has no exception:
    Green, oddly fruity, ozonic, kind of wet metallic note too.
    The rose oxide note goes all over the composition and really punch you on the face.
    Has that caractheristic softener like smell but more fruity, that blends unique with the metal accord.
    I can detect the green accord too and the lichen that put your feet on a real life floor.
    Can't detect violet flower ( or could be violet leafs???), no leather, but it dries down quite nice soft ambary and light woody too.
    Average sillage.
    In my skin no more than three hours.
    If you like synthetics in the way of CDG, and you're young, go for it.
    I put neutral vote for the lasting power.

    26 October, 2007

    madridbatabidd's avatar
    madridbatabidd
    Spain Spain

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    Calvin Klein Man by Calvin Klein

    Nothing particular, could be easily confused with many other's around.

    Calvin Klein MAN contains rosemary, mandarin, bay, juniper, nutmeg, incense, spearmint, cypress wood, and, oh dear, the usual (and overused) fragrance notes of bergamot, violet leaf, guaiac wood, sandalwood, amberwood (which is in LOTS of fragrances this year) and musk...

    The start is nice crisp and gorgeous.
    The base and the dry down spoil everything again... Centered in a scented composition of really horrible cheap bergamot scent (as the two last launches for men) and a (thank god for that) nice aroma of juniper,light woods and shy incense note.

    The same result of CKin2u or euphoria.
    Smells mostly the same with a variable of one unique note that make a slightly difference on them.
    Words apart of the lack of quality.
    Cheap manufacture means cheap result, cheaps smell.
    argh!

    26 October, 2007

    tvlampboy's avatar
    tvlampboy
    United States United States

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    R de Capucci by Roberto Capucci

    A delightful chameleon, this green chypre.

    R starts out bright and green and clear, very citrusy without being overpowering. It then moves into a spicy carnation middle -- probably my personal favorite in the evolution of it all.

    The final dry-down is really special -- masculine and dry without being overly powdery (not too much tonka!) and/or egregiously sandalwood-y.

    Hirch_Duckfinder, I owe you one.

    26 October, 2007

    odysseusm's avatar
    odysseusm
    Canada Canada

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    Clubman by Truefitt & Hill

    I don’t care for Clubman. I agree with zztopp and others. The synthetic/oceanic note here is not pleasant, and I find that it muddles the other elements. There is a pleasant citrus opening. The mint is not as strong as in Freshman. The woody musk is probably the nicest element, but that doggone ‘plasticky’ element ruins this. I’m not sure what this is supposed to be: it is not fresh enough in a nice way to be a fresh scent, not woody or spice enough to be that sort of scent, in the end it is nothing much at all. T&H has some great scents (Grafton in particular, also Trafalgar) but this is not one of them.

    26 October, 2007

    Mr. G's avatar
    Mr. G
    Denmark Denmark

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    Mitsouko by Guerlain

    Mitsouko - meaning 'mystery' in Japanese - was the first of the chypre fragrances after the original 'Chypre' by Coty. Created by Jacques Guerlain in 1919, Mitsouko is still today recognized as the quintessential chypre, exemplary because its formula is short, simple and refined. It boasted the very first use of synthetic peach fragrance - aldehyde C14 - in a perfume, which harmonizes the lurid, dry chypre-base with a powdery, fleshy and luminous feel. 'The best perfume ever made', says perfume expert Luca Turin. The name was derived from the heroine Mitsouko of Claude Farrere's novel 'La Bataille' about the love affair between a British naval officer and the wife of a Japanese admiral. The fragrance itself can be said to live up to its name since it's extremely abstract: Its notes are some of the hardest to decipher among all the Guerlain perfumes. Mitsouko is in a different world than the flowery orientals, at least as strange as it is sensual, as peculiar as it is pretty, both violent and wonderful - some even call the scent 'disturbing'. Fans will die for it, while others are downright put off by it. Due to a bottle shortage after the First World War, Mitsouko shares its design with L'Heure Bleue, and it's said that the two identical bottles mark, respectively, the beginning and ending of World War I, like a parenthesis. Recent European health regulations have banned the use of oakmoss in perfumes and led to a reformulation of Mitsouko, leaving the new Mitsouko somewhat brighter and 'younger' - but no less enigmatic.

    26 October, 2007 (Last Edited: 25 April, 2008)

    Mr. G's avatar
    Mr. G
    Denmark Denmark

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    L'Heure Bleue by Guerlain

    A very early and innovative floral-oriental style fragrance that has become a truly distinctive classic. The fragrance was created by Jacques Guerlain in 1912 as a tribute to the painters of the impressionist paintings he was a keen collector of. In fact, L'Heure Bleue (meaning 'the blue hour') is a reference to the special hour at dusk when the light seems blue and the smell of the flowers in and around the city of Grasse reaches its peak. The phrase is also used to refer to the city of Paris immediately prior to World War I, which was considered to be a time of relative innocence before the horrors that were to follow. Although much akin to Après l'Ondée in its gourmand pastry and almond core, L'Heure Bleue is much less bright and more spicy. Especially the Parfum-version is dominated by the spice-world of ancient Persia. The bottle, often called 'flacon bouchon coeur' for its heart-shaped stopper, were designed by Jacques' nephew Raymond Guerlain as a reference to the romantic pre-war time. Still, L'Heure Bleue is primarily known to be a melancholic scent.

    26 October, 2007 (Last Edited: 12 April, 2008)

    Mr. G's avatar
    Mr. G
    Denmark Denmark

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    Vol de Nuit by Guerlain

    This fragrance was launched in 1933, the same year as Air France, which is not as tenuous a link as it might at first appear. In French, Vol de Nuit means 'night flight' which is also the name of a novel from 1931 by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, famous pilot during the war. Saint-Exupéry was killed in action over France in 1944 and his body was never recovered. The French Air Force College cadets still give out Vol de Nuit with their emblem on official foreign visits. The perfume bottle's design imitates a propeller in motion. Together, L'Heure Bleue, Mitsouko and Vol de Nuit are often referred to as 'sister fragrances’ because of their shared powdery spicy-floral qualities. Yet, Vol de Nuit is the darkest, most subtly spiced of the three, and consequently some people find it to be a 'unisex' fragrance, just like Jicky.

    Family: oriental, woody, spicy. Top notes: bergamot, galbanum, petitgrain. Middle notes: jasmine, daffodil, spices. Base notes: wood, iris, vanilla, amber notes, earthy forest note.

    26 October, 2007

    Mr. G's avatar
    Mr. G
    Denmark Denmark

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    Shalimar by Guerlain

    Guerlain's most famous perfume is named after the Shalimar Gardens in Lahore, modern day Pakistan, built by Mughal emporor Shah Jahan in 1641-1642, where he then walked with his beloved wife Mumtaz Mahal. Sadly, Mumtaz Mahal died in childbirth three years after the emporor's accession to the throne, and in her memory he built the mausoleum Taj Mahal at Agra in modern day India. In 1981, Shalimar Gardens was included as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Shalimar is one of the first perfumes to successfully incorporate large amounts of vanillin in its composition. The fragrance is said to be an accidental derivative of Jicky. The story goes that on receipt of the newly developed synthetic ingredient 'ethyl vanilla', Jaques Guerlain dropped some into a bottle of Jicky for no good reason and so the foundation of Shalimar was born. The scent of Shalimar is deep and velvetly black with notes of lemon hinted medicinal vanilla. Interestingly enough, Shalimar was actually created in 1921 despite only being launched in 1925. Raymond Guerlain designed the original 'fan-shaped bottle' for Shalimar for the Decorative Arts Exhibition in Paris in 1925, imitating an urn on a pedestal. Shalimar is still the flagship perfume of the House of Guerlain. In recent years, the bergamot top note has been made more dominating than in earlier formulations, giving the fragrance a less balsamic, more 'perfumey' initial impression. In 2007, Shalimar was redressed in a limited edition black glass bottle to celebrate the dark character of the fragrance.

    26 October, 2007 (Last Edited: 12 April, 2008)

    Mr. G's avatar
    Mr. G
    Denmark Denmark

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    Chamade by Guerlain

    In 1969, Jean-Paul Guerlain continued the new romantic, sensual inspiration from Habit Rouge into Chamade, generally regarded as his best feminine creation. Like Habit Rouge, Chamade is a citrusy oriental, but the animalic note is replaced by hyacinth, heavy and green, and — probably used here for the first time in perfumery — blackcurrant bud. The mix of bergamot, hyacinth and blackcurrant has resulted in a crisp, rich and almost leathery note of new-mown hay on a burning hot summer day — thus we are still in Jean-Paul Guerlain's beloved equestrian countryside-world! From beginning to end this scent gradually moves through different phases, each one displaying the supreme blackcurrant note in a new, charming light. The idea for this perfume was inspired by Françoise Sagan's heartbreaking 1965 novel "La chamade" about a woman's difficult search for wholeness and understanding what happiness really is. In the time of Napoléon, "chamade" signified a very fast drumbeat that called to retreat of the troops during war, and the novel introduces this word as a metaphor, both for the surrendering heartbeat of a person in love, and, more tragically, for love's defeat in the end. "Perfume is made mainly so that one remembers the woman who wears it. I like to call it the elevator effect," Jean-Paul Guerlain said when Chamade was released. "This is the man who goes to meet his lover — whether it be his fiancee, his wife, or his mistress — who has entered a building before him. She is wearing perfume, and he smells it. Suddenly his heart beats faster and the blood rushes to his head." Chamade's fragrant love story is rounded by a bottle in shape of a heart turned upside down and pierced by an arrow – a symbol of emotional surrender. The current edition of Chamade has lost some of its famous crispiness because of slightly more bitter, thin top notes, but the beautiful, oily drydown is luckily preserved. In 1999, Jean-Paul Guerlain created a masculine chypre version, Chamade pour Homme, also containing hyacinth.

    26 October, 2007 (Last Edited: 27 July, 2009)

    Mr. G's avatar
    Mr. G
    Denmark Denmark

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    Metalys / Metallica by Guerlain

    The name Metallica may at first glance seem odd for a perfume who is said to be, according to Guerlain's own promotional information, 'one of the most beautiful interpretations of vanilla in a perfume'. It was a limited edition release from 2000 and drew some attention, not least because of its packaging in an unusually decorated version of the classic 'bee bottle' – flacon abeilles – and the fact that it was soon pulled from the shelves following a trademark lawsuit with the heavy rock band Metallica. Now it's sold under the name Metalys in the 'Les Parisiennes' collection. This floral oriental emanates from Jean-Paul Guerlain's wish to create a metallic odour, though some reviewers have found the fragrance to be too sweet and creamy to meet this goal. While surely being light years away from rockish black metal, this Eau de Toilette actually manages to evoke a sweet-metallic scent of old, unpolished metal coins, mainly by a contrasting blend of spicy-sharp carnation and bright, soft vanilla.

    26 October, 2007 (Last Edited: 12 April, 2008)

    Mr. G's avatar
    Mr. G
    Denmark Denmark

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    Derby by Guerlain

    Jean Paul Guerlain envisioned this perfume when he was standing in front of the grand Roman amphitheatre of El Djem in Tunesia. And surely this delicately fougèrish, yet leathery and spicy chypre evokes images of cool, tuxedo-clad colonial masters in hot Arabic surroundings. It's known to be one of the most well balanced leather-chypres for men, and its spiciness equals that of L'Heure Bleue both in terms of strength, quality and emotional effect. Launched in 1985, it was abandoned after some years on the market, but then taken up again as part of 'Les Parisiennes' collection, exclusively sold in the Paris-store. Sadly, also this edition has been discontinued because of health regulations against certain ingredients. Its original bottle is referred to as 'the eagle bottle' because of the inspiration from an eagle's outspread wings seen from above or below. The stopper imitates the eagle's head shape, giving the whole bottle an aggressive yet noble air, perfectly in tune with the scent and its motto: 'Barbare et très civilisé'.

    Family: woody, spicy, leather. Top notes: bergamot, lemon, artemisia, peppermint. Middle notes: pimento, rose, pepper, mace, jasmin. Base notes: leather, vetiver, sandal, patchouli, moss.

    26 October, 2007

    Mr. G's avatar
    Mr. G
    Denmark Denmark

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    Habit Rouge by Guerlain

    Jean-Paul Guerlain has been quoted to say that 'perfume is the most intense form of memory', and he proved this and the extent of his talent when he in 1965 launched Habit Rouge on the world market. Habit Rouge means 'red jacket' or 'hunting coat' and refers to professional equestrians' dark red jacket. Jean-Paul Guerlain is himself an excellent equestrian, and this woody, citrusy and leathery fragrance is a vivid reminder of the leather saddle on the horse back and all the smells of the horse rider. It's the most distinctive and recognisable of all the Guerlain perfumes for men and regarded as the world's first masculine oriental. The balance between the dry citrus top notes and its sweet vanilla base is known to be one of the finest and most skilfully made in perfume history. When asked if it will ever be discontinued, Guerlain replies: 'Non, Habit Rouge c'est comme les petits pains' – it's that classic! Together with Mitsouko and Shalimar, Habit Rouge is among the ten perfumes that perfume expert Luca Turin would save in Noah's Perfume Ark. The now indispensable Eau de Toilette-version of both Habit Rouge and Vetiver wasn't invented until 1988 to meet the eighties' demand for longer lasting scents and stronger sillage - a trend that also gave birth to Eau de Parfum (or, in Guerlain's terms, Parfum de Toilette) versions of Shalimar, Jicky, Mitsouko, L'Heure Bleue and Chamade in 1986 and 1987. In 2003, Jean-Paul Guerlain created a new 'Eau de Parfum' version of Habit Rouge, in which agarwood has been added to the base, giving the scent a more formal feel. Though still recognisably Habit Rouge, it's more a reformulation than a mere concentrated version of the original. With the newest Habit Rouge derivative, Eau de Toilette Légère from 2005, Jean-Paul Guerlain added a fizzy lime-lemony accord to the top notes and thereby modulated the whole Habit Rouge 'tune' into a bright, joyful key.

    26 October, 2007 (Last Edited: 12 April, 2008)

    Mr. G's avatar
    Mr. G
    Denmark Denmark

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    Héritage by Guerlain

    Héritage bears its name because Jean-Paul Guerlain's vision with this rich, woody fragrance from 1992 was to synthesize the immense olfactory heritage of Guerlain's past creations into one masculine scent. And it certainly plays on the whole famous Guerlain scent repertoire: Vanilla, fine wood, flower and spices. Some people find this perfume to be introvert and reserved, and it's true that it's very formal and elegant. This is particularly true of the dense Eau de Parfum-version, while the Eau de Toilette has a more 'open', transparent and flowery feel from the outset. In each case, the deep warmth of its woody base notes equalizes its initial buttoned up-expression. Héritage is one of Guerlain's most refined and 'clean' fragrances for men, not sharing the sensuality and 'dirtiness' that is such a characteristic of many Guerlain perfumes. Its bottle is as elegant and stringent as the scent itself.

    26 October, 2007 (Last Edited: 16 April, 2008)

    Mr. G's avatar
    Mr. G
    Denmark Denmark

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    Jicky by Guerlain

    Created in 1889 by Aimé Guerlain, Jicky is one of the greatest of all the classic perfumes and yet probably the first of the modern 'abstract' fragrances at the same time, a semi-oriental fougère. It used what were considered to be very modern notes for the time - coumarin was only isolated from the tonka bean in 1868 - and is the antidote to all the earlier scented waters that consisted of easily defined flower essences. In Jicky, the formulation is complex and difficult to strip down. It marks the beginning of modern art where the work must display hidden meanings and impressions rather than just pure imitation. When it first appeared, many women did not accept or understand it. The hint of animal scent was too brutal and unexpected for women in 1889. In fact, men were the first to appreciate it, and it wasn't until 1912 that women's magazines finally began to sing its praises. Today, Jicky is considered by many as being the 'ultimate' fougère. The perfume bottle is inspired by medicine jars but with a surprising 'champagne bottle stopper', symbolizing joy and celebration. Now sold in the standard 'quadrilobe' bottle. Its name has been told to be that of an English girl Aimé once proposed - but it's most of all also the nickname of Aimé's nephew Jacques.

    26 October, 2007 (Last Edited: 12 April, 2008)

    Mr. G's avatar
    Mr. G
    Denmark Denmark

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    Mouchoir de Monsieur by Guerlain

    Mouchoir de Monsieur ('gentleman's handkerchief') was created by Jacques Guerlain in 1904 and still has a loyal fan base. It's from an epoch where well-to-do, hat-wearing ladies promenaded with their gloved hand under the arm of elegant monsieurs. In the gentleman's breast pocket sat a small handkerchief, and it was 'bon ton' to offer this handkerchief lightly perfumed with cologne to the lady as a romantic souvenir. According to Guerlain, Jacques initially conceived this perfume along with its female counterpart Voilette de Madame as a gift set for a friend's wedding. Heavy perfumes were not in fashion at the turn of the century, so this fragrance is a delicate, aromatic fougère. Some argue that Mouchoir de Monsieur is basically a more straightforward version of Jicky, i.e. Jicky without the balsamic opoponax base note.

    26 October, 2007 (Last Edited: 12 April, 2008)

    Mr. G's avatar
    Mr. G
    Denmark Denmark

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    Vetiver by Guerlain

    Jean-Paul Guerlain was the first (and last) family member to create several fragrances for men, and Vetiver was his first masculine creation. Ever since the company's great cologne period, Guerlain hadn't created another men's fragrance except Mouchoir de Monsieur and Jicky. Vetiver filled this gap. In fact, Vetiver was first created for Mexico, one of the biggest consumers of Guerlain's 'Vetiver extract', but in 1958, Carven's vetiver scent became a threatening presence on the market, and director Jean-Pierre Guerlain wanted it modernized. It became a job for his 22 year old nephew Jean-Paul, who let himself be inspired by 'the smell of a gardener' - tobacco and earth. It was launched in 1959, and its spicy earthy-freshness deriving from the Indian vetiver grass root proved to be an instant success. The fragrance is from the outset dominated by a distinctive, slightly bitter nutmeg note that is considered uniquely delightful by fans, a bit harsh and 'medicinal' by some others, but the scent rounds itself upon wearing and ends in a surprising, sweet tobacco note. Although Guerlain maintains that the composition of Vetiver has not been changed during the years, most Vetiver-lovers are convinced that it has been made brighter, fresher and less 'earthy' in the current edition. It's still up for debate, though, if the oldest edition's earthiness and darkness is only due to ageing of the fragrant juice. In 2000, Vetiver was launched with a modern bottle, juice color, packaging and advertising, and it's still a favorite among many men. Recently, several modern variations on the Vetiver-theme has been launched, like the spiced up Vetiver Extrême with added vetiver root, tarragon, licorice and smoky frankincense, and the more tender and flowery Vetiver pour Elle.

    26 October, 2007 (Last Edited: 12 April, 2008)

    Mr. G's avatar
    Mr. G
    Denmark Denmark

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    Spiritueuse Double Vanille by Guerlain

    Five years after his retirement, Jean-Paul Guerlain continues to put his fingerprints on the image of the house. With Spiritueuse Double Vanille, a high quality, limited edition Eau de Parfum from 2007, he once again dwells on the famous guerlinade's indispensable ingredient vanilla. This time it's not Metallica's bright, shining vanilla, but a sombre, Shalimarish gourmand vanilla. And it's a state-of-the-art Jean-Paul-Guerlain! Unlike most other fragrances, its opening is not dominated by citrus. Instead it starts with tingling alcoholic notes of matured dark rum and continues through vanilla, moisty pipe tobacco, cedar wood, frankincense, dry spices and the tiniest bit of rose. It makes you travel to colorful, sexy Havana, then to stringent Pierre Hermé's deluxe cake shop in Paris. This fragrance is fat, deep and delicious, its sillage is velvet soft and detectable twenty hours after application, and it's not wrongly marketed as an aphrodisiac. The bottle is a simple, sharp and tasteful block of thick glass, embellished with the famous bee-symbol in red sealing wax. The label on the bottle's back tells this small erotic story about vanilla: 'Vanilla belongs to the Orchid family and was discovered by Cortez [Spanish explorer born in 1485]. Considering that vanilla in the 17th Century was acclimatized in royal gardens, its infertility was surprising. The botanists had not understood that the bees were actually flirting with the vanilla plants. It was Charles Albius, a slave from Reunion Island, that in 1841 discovered the 'gesture' that ensured the vanilla plant's line of descent: With the aid of a sharp point of bamboo he picked out the pollen and transferred it to the flower's stigma. Today, the hands of professional 'matchmakers' can fertilize, one by one, up to 2000 flowers per day. Vanilla is mainly cultivated in Madagascar, Java, Tahiti, Reunion Island and Seychelles. In time of harvest, each vanilla bean is picked when it has reached a precise level of ripening. That's when the ritual of preparation begins.'

    26 October, 2007 (Last Edited: 12 April, 2008)

    chengfun's avatar
    chengfun
    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Tuberose by Renée

    This fragrance reminds me of Tubereuse Criminelle but without the strong menthol opening. It is also more feminine. Definitely worth a try for those who like TC.

    26 October, 2007

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    bokaba
    United States United States

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    Dunhill for Men by Dunhill

    EDIT 11/10/2009

    I must say that I have fallen for this fragrance in a big way. I am forced to surmise that the neutral and negative reviews here might be for the 2003 fragrance release Dunhill for Men, which is entirely different. Now, on to the fragrance itself. In my opening Dunhill opens with a blast of indolic bergamot, lavender while the heart florals of rose, muguet, geranium, jasmine, and others arise. The opening is soapy, but soapy in a good way. The dry down is composed of musk, tonka, discreet vanilla, leather, and possibly a drop of civet or castoreum for the nuance—but mere nuance—of an animalic note. This IS the pre-WWI masculine Luca Turin is searching for! Citrus on top, flowers in the middle, and a drop of animalic musk to temper the base. Also, even though this is an EdC concentration, it last all day and intensifies if the weather is hot. This is a must buy for any serious perfumer enthusiast and is available online for low prices—look for the cylinder bottle!

    26 October, 2007 (Last Edited: 11th November, 2009)

    LaurenStDavid's avatar
    LaurenStDavid
    United States United States

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    Covet Sarah Jessica Parker by Sarah Jessica Parker

    I absolutely HATE this fragrane. I'd had such a wonderful experience with SJP's Lovely, and of course I was excited for Covet. I was SO let down when I tried this perfume. It's very heavy and cloying, and to my nose it smells very strongly of wet cloves. Somehow it manages to come off as unbearably sweet. The whole experience was nauseating and it gave me a terrible headache.

    26 October, 2007

    erichtonius's avatar
    erichtonius
    France France

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    Santa Maria Novella by Santa Maria Novella

    L'Eau de Cologne Santa Maria Novella, originally 'Eau de la Reine' made for Catherine de Medicis, reine de France, is the very original Eau de Cologne. And the only one for me with its subtil white flower notes, and dominant mix of bergamote, citrus and neroli.

    26 October, 2007

    erichtonius's avatar
    erichtonius
    France France

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    L'Eau by Diptyque

    Their very best fragrance, authentic and original. made from 16th c. pomander and pot-pourri.

    26 October, 2007

    erichtonius's avatar
    erichtonius
    France France

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    Philosykos by Diptyque

    one of the best fig fragrance. But, could be wearisome..

    26 October, 2007

    erichtonius's avatar
    erichtonius
    France France

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    Opôné by Diptyque

    I loved it. But very hard to wear all a day long. It's better as a home scent..

    26 October, 2007

    Showing 661 to 690 of 788.