Fragrance Reviews from March 2007

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    Cinnamom's avatar

    United States United States

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    Heaven Sent (original) by Dana

    The original Heaven Sent, by Helena Rubenstein, was lovely. The 'new' version; feh! What a shame. It smells like it's been 'cheaped down'. I don't know what they've done to it. At first I thought it was my body chemistry that had changed, but now I'm convinced they've absolutely changed the formulation. Pity.

    09 March, 2007

    Cinnamom's avatar

    United States United States

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    Pierre Cardin Pour Monsieur by Pierre Cardin

    I first encountered this in New Orleans in the early '70's & bought a bottle for my enamorata of the moment. It worked perfectly with his chemistry. I remember thinking there was a strong clove component and that it had a very astringent element . . . almost medicinal at first, very clean bordering on dentist office. Then the metamorphosis into that spicey, warm umph. Ah, youth, ah, yes.

    09 March, 2007

    tartarugaz's avatar

    Portugal Portugal

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    Eau de Cologne by Chanel

    An instant classic: crisp, fresh and modern. My "basic" cologne.

    09 March, 2007

    the_good_life's avatar

    Germany Germany

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    Acqua di Parma Colonia by Acqua di Parma

    Notes: English Lavender, Sicilian citrus, rosemary, verbena, Bulgarian rose, jasmine
    vetiver, Mysore sandalwood, ylang ylang, cedar, amber, white musk
    “Tradition” rarely represents the seamless historical continuity that invests ideas, objects, or practices with authority or cultural cachet. How many times have you stood in a supposedly medieval church that was really bombed to rubble in WWII and then rebuilt as a “medieval church” ? The famed Nuremberg Christkindl market is a Nazi invention in its current form (they also gothicized many Romanesque or Renaissance buildings because gothic was considered to be “Aryan.”) I do not know how many tourists take the Houses of Parliament to be medieval buildings rather than neo-gothic reconstructions actually of more recent date than the White House.
    What am I driving at here? The fact, of course, that many fragrance houses use their supposedly venerable age and an unbroken tradition reaching back to some quasi-mythical founder as a means of increasing their prestige, turning cultural capital into brand power, higher prices and a marketable story. 4711 and Carthusia give us romantic fairytales about monks. Creed is the most blatant example, perhaps, of a constant insistence on traditionality, coupled with virtually absolute silence on any significant details of the house’s actual history. Who ever learns, that the Creed’s were couturiers and launched their perfume line as late as 1975? Acqua di Parma is another case of history looming large, though they have not chosen the seamless tradition spiel for their narrative, but the “phoenix risen from the ashes” model. A prestigious cologne, though hardly old, the (supposedly, hopefully) all-natural AdP was created in 1916, when synthetics-based perfumery was already in full flush and the market had shifted from its restricted aristocratic and haute-bourgeoisie clientel towards mass production for an increasingly broadening white collar consumer class. It is just about the time that 4711 (as which it was reinvented 1881 after Farina Gegenüber achieved prohibition, having lobbied for the introduction of the trademark system, of the use of its name by plagiarizers such as the Mühlens family), an industrially produced cheap cologne became a household name that would obliterate the original artisanal product (Farina Gegenüber) in the public consciousness. AdP was a late but successful newcomer and played on its popularity among the new aristocracy during its halcyon days in the 1930s-1950s: Hollywood stars. Then, as tastes changed, it was out, living a twilight existence, only to be rejuvenated in the course of the new craving for old style luxury that began in the yuppie 80s and became full-blown during the New Economy, whose progenitors, like the robber barons of the 1880s craved the emblems of old money once they retired to their patrician estates. The Italian rejuvenators, old hands in the luxury business, refashioned AdP into a prestigious “must have” in the right circles, expanded the line massively (they have very mediocre fragrances now, too) and sold out for what was probably a 10000% percent profit. Good for them, though it pains me to see, that a fine product such as AdP is now another “preciousss” in the slimy grasping hands of Bernard Gollum Arnault of LVMH, the Woolworth’s of the rich and famous. LVMH squares the circle by mass marketing exclusivity, by making the rare universally available, by marketing tinsel (such as Vuitton luggage) as “haut gamme” to anyone who is willing to fork out surplus cash for a label that signifies old world prestige (for readers of Germany, here are Luca Turin’s thought on this: http://snipurl.com/1ci7o.) A sure sign of the success of LVMH marketing machine is the wild popularity of AdP products on ebay, where it is always the subject of bidding wars, while at the same time so ubiquitously present that I must wonder how many of these bottles are Eastern European fakes. Either that, or many people who buy this as a form of prepackaged good taste find out they don’t really like it (perhaps because they actually lack good taste). So the question is, I suppose, can you enjoy a great cologne knowing that thousands who wear it do so, not because they appreciate it, but because it is a life-style ‘choice’ dictated by fashion rags like GQ? Well, I do. AdP Colonia is a nice departure from classic French (and the one German) colognes that emphasize hesperides and herbs, only rounded off with a touch of rose, musk or tonka. Here, the rose is far stronger, really defining the fragrance (with some help from the subtle but persistent ylang ylang) after the initial, incredibly refreshing lemon- blast, itself cleverly prolonged by the use of verbena. The woody base is more fortified as well, giving this excellent longevity, especially for a cologne. This hovers close to your skin all day, providing the finishing touch of sophistication that makes you feel so genteel. Acqua di Parma is a marvellous, refined, unique product, not because, but inspite of the hype created around it by its execrable owners. It bears its fate with the poise and imperturbability of a true gentleman.

    09 March, 2007 (Last Edited: 11th March, 2013)

    kbe's avatar

    United States United States

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    Montana Parfum d'Homme (original) by Montana

    A first cousin to Aramis Havana for Men, the intense opening is parallel, perhaps more Oriental but not quite as wild. The initial intense in-your-face spice/dried fruit compote slowly melds into an intoxicating background drydown of musk, incense and mulled wine for me. A very seductive scent you can enjoy alone or, better yet, allowing it to capture the attention of others.

    Definitely a keeper and a legitimate steal at current prices (2007). Get it while you can as not too many know this discontinued gem. It is a wonderfully masculine 'killer' of a scent.

    edit 7/4/08: Apparently being manufactured and available again in a formula very close to if not identical to the original. This is a truly wonderful fragrance, with similarities to Havana for Men but definitely going it's own beautiful way. It has an appealing dusky-bergamot-citrus opening and glides through a long, delicious drydown.

    I will try to never be without a bottle and have sufficient backups stored safely away to make that a fact. When you find a frag you love, you never know when some marketing 'genius' will change it for the worse or ::shudder:: make it disappear..

    09 March, 2007 (Last Edited: 08 May, 2014)

    Clayton's avatar

    Abu Dhabi Abu Dhabi

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    Tumulte pour Homme by Christian Lacroix

    Greatly confused by this one. I was anticipating a deeply pious festival of cedar. Got cedar chip in pickle brine instead.

    10th March, 2007

    F_Frez's avatar



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    Bulgari pour Homme Soir by Bulgari

    About 3 months ago a fragrance seller told me about a new Bulgari fragrance she smelled in a training course, a very good one according to her. Following her recommendation I wanted to try it, but on every store I ask for a try they never had a tester bottle. One day I went to a department store to try Terre D'Hermes, I found the dependent had a Bulgari Pour Homme Soir tester. As it was almost night, I asked him to spray it on paper instead on my skin... that way I could check it that night and the next day.

    When smelled on paper at the store and at home, it didn't give me a good first impression. A strong odor, like a bitter flower or some kind of plant dominated the top notes... somewhat like Zara Man or an Axe/Lynx deodorant. This note faded later, but it was always present that night. Just at the next day the note went away, and more elegant base notes of tea, soft wood and a bit of ambar could be felt.

    I search for the notes in Internet, and a "lifescent" note figured on it, along with darjeeling tea and guaiac wood. Could be that strong bitter odor the lifescent note??? On skin that bitter note lasted about 2 or 3 hours, latter it went to tea and dirty earth notes (not in the same way of Terre d'Hermes)... but that note was really annoying. Apart from that note, the tea notes wasn't bad, but you must wait about 3 hours for this. For an office or evening use and for an age range of 30-40 years old.

    10th March, 2007

    iMaverick's avatar



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    Grey Flannel by Geoffrey Beene

    Hmmm...Grey Flannel has changed a bit slightly nowadays. It's lost its bright fizziness as well as that tight formulation of violet and oakmoss to perfection, which leads me to think that this is probably a synthetic oakmoss that smells flatter than the real thing. Still has good longevity which makes me happy, and you can't go wrong purchasing this classic at a steal everywhere. My most beloved fougere, still here, still around...that's all that matters!

    10th March, 2007

    Candy Perfume Boy's avatar

    England England

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    Eau de Star by Thierry Mugler

    Bought this today, very nice fragrance, not Muglers best but it's good for him not to bring out something ground breaking or over the top. It's a very subtle, ambery version of Angel, it does share some similarities with Cool Water for women but it has something darker lurking beneath the surface. There is definitely some Angel swimming about in these shores!

    10th March, 2007

    mugler's avatar



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    The Dreamer by Versace

    The dreamer is like a dream. I've yet to come across a scent as provocative as this. Transparent and modern yet very deep at the heart, it's magic. The similarities to D&G ph are there but the dreamer is not a mere scent, it is poetry. Rather romantic one, I would say.

    10th March, 2007

    omniray's avatar



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    Aqua pour Homme by Bulgari

    more than a a simple Aqua version, this is fragance is very oceanic and deep than others...

    awesome ..

    10th March, 2007

    oolong's avatar

    United States United States

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    Aveda Pure-Fume Tonic for Men by Aveda

    I'm someone who really feels most at home with cool weather fragrances; deep resonant fragrances, unmistakably masculine, with complex notes and a strong personality. I usually find the fresh, aquatic, light fragrances of summer to be somewhat dull. As far as I'm concerned, if fragrances were music, the fresh/aquatic fragrances of summer would be soft rock or easy listening and in some cases elevator music. Acceptable as background music but nothing which inspires passion. That being said, summer scents have their place and very definite uses. Of the summer scents I've tried, this is one of the better ones. So I guess I'm giving this fragrance something of a back handed thumbs up.

    10th March, 2007

    oolong's avatar

    United States United States

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    Vetiver by Guerlain

    A classic and timeless fragrance which is just not for everyone and I'm one of the ones it is not for. I gave it a try, used it for three full days and REALLY wanted to like it but just could not. I expect it is worth a try but as with any fragrance with a strong personality, you really need to try before you buy.

    10th March, 2007

    Quarry's avatar

    United States United States

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    Mandragore by Annick Goutal

    Update: I now own the big bottle. The citrus and greenness with a bit of sweetness pack a one-two punch I find appealing this spring.
    - - - - - - -
    This is the first Goutal I've liked, but it leaves me frustrated for its meekness. I have to plant my nose right on my skin to appreciate its classy spearmint aroma. I've been looking for a scent like this, but if it has no sillage, I'll have to keep searching.

    10th March, 2007 (Last Edited: 28 May, 2008)

    Quarry's avatar

    United States United States

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    Bois d'Arménie by Guerlain

    Notes: Pink pepper, iris, rose, coriander, benzoin, Indonesian patchouli, incense, precious woods, musk and balsams.

    This is how I like my scents: mellow, a touch sweet, and in a contralto key. The floral top notes hardly register to me. It's like an "instant basenotes" frag. Because I already have Ambre Narguile, Feminite du Bois and Black Cashmere, I don't think there's a place for Bd'A in my wardrobe. For one thing, those other scents have more throw, and Bd'A is, like other Guerlains, a skin scent, which is frustrating when you look at the price tag.

    10th March, 2007

    Quarry's avatar

    United States United States

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    Flirtatious by Flirt!

    Kohl's has lots of good general merchandise, but their fragrance offerings have never impressed me because they're the usual department-story-quality offerings. That being said, I have to give a "thumb up" to the new Flirt launched by Kohl's. It smells like what it purports to: an intoxicating blend of exotic wild berry, enchanting honeysuckle and creamy vanilla. Yeah, it's another fruity floral, but better than most. It has lots of oomph, so only a small spritz would do ya. I'm smelling the paper strip a couple weeks after having sprayed it, and the fruit and vanilla are still apparent. It's not for me, but a young gal could do worse than Flirt.

    10th March, 2007

    Ric's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Fleur du Male by Jean Paul Gaultier

    Nice, although a little feminine. Reminds me of the original Boucheron perfume for ladies – If fact, if I wanted to smell like this, I’d probably wear the Boucheron.

    10th March, 2007

    the_good_life's avatar

    Germany Germany

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    R de Capucci by Roberto Capucci

    Notes:
    Bergamot, Lemon, Petitgrain, Clary sage, Green note
    Jasmine, Mandarin, Clove, Rose, Aldehyde
    Patchouli, Moss, Leather, Amber, Vetiver, Musk, Tonka
    Unquestionably the greatest Capucci contribution to perfumery and indeed one of the best chypres ever produced. In fact, I believe this is one of the best perfumes ever produced. The quality, the mastery of the assemblage, the charmingly smooth, yet intellectual texture – this is the chypre complement to Eau d’Hermes, no less. Shake your heads in disbelief but this one is on par with creations by Roudnitska, Daltroff, and the Guerlains. A fantasy citrus according to the H&R genealogy (which I find a bit misleading), fresh chypre in other categorizations. More complex, less citric than Capucci pour home, a chypre but not identifiably “80s.” There is no herbal Artemisia bludgeon here, but a cleaner, straighter greenness in the top notes, more in the direction of Bowling Green, but infinitely more sophisticated – and the floral middle notes come on quite early. Gentle, slightly dark rose, smooth aldehydes, the sublime use of jasmine add up to an incredibly suave, classy feel. Brilliant! The base is softened by Tonka and amber, but nothing is here is remotely powdery. The “macho” components are very subtly employed, making this much less dated, or dateable, than your Portos, Ho Hang, Yatagan, etc. Soft, suede-like leather, low key, nothing either birch-tarry (as in Cuir de Russie or Lonestar) or lushly sweet (as in Royal English Leather. Mossy notes are dominant in the base, there is some dry patchouli and just a hint of Tonka sweetness, all this melting together into sheer delight. All in all, R stays very “clean,” as hirch-duckfinder correctly notes, but do not confuse this with the limp, synthetic, fabric-softener “clean” of the ‘90s and ‘00s, it is infinitely superior. I should add that R is much finer on skin than on a test strip – it is one to be tested live. Regrettably I do not know the perfumer. A big name, an unsung hero, a one hit wonder? Whichever, “R” is a perfectly balanced display of subtle masculinity, seamless from top through base, refined as an Italian silk suit. Speaking of which, this is far superior as a suave suit scent to Kiton Men, which, while decent, smells like ineptly thrown together synthetics in direct comparison with R. The difference in quality between the two rose notes is an object lesson in the art of perfumery. In fact R degrades a whole lot of better known gentleman’s fragrances to the status of pimply faced kids. Can you understand now, why after trying this I was obsessed with getting my hands/nose on every other available Capucci? I found them all and none matched this, not even the glorious Punjab. I will go out on a limb and say: no one with the remotest interest in fragrances can afford to ignore this. I speak in earnest. This is the sleeper of sleepers. Or, as Squire duckfinder has patiently proclaimed for some time and much more succinctly than myself: "Wear 'R' de Capucci!"

    10th March, 2007

    zztopp's avatar

    United States United States

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    Sandalo by Lorenzo Villoresi


    Tam Dao notes: Rosewood, Cypress, Goa Sandalwood, Ambergris

    I know this is a review of LV Sandalo, but my initial impressions of it were "A Glorified Tam Dao!!". Upon closer inspection and comparing it with Vanuatu and Australian Sandalwood EOs unveiled deeper intricacies of these mysterious "mysore" wonders.

    Sandalo features a copious heart of Rosewood while Tam Dao's first half is an excercise in hitting the senses hard with a forceful Cedarwood note. It is important to understand what Rose/Cedar wood smell like, and to not confuse them with sandalwood (which happens a lot). Rosewood has a floral-sweet smell with hints of spiciness while cedarwood smells woody and "pencil-shaving like" with hints of smooth sweet warmth which is quite "sandalwood" like. As previously mentioned, Sandalo hits hard with rosewood. Initially, the excellent notes of lavender and rose do a coital dance over the underlying layer of rosewood - after a few minutes, these two notes merge and bring forth the rosewood heart in naked display. I believe that it was a design decision to use lavender and rose inconcert with rosewood to amplify the rosewood accord (a mix of lavender and rose can smell a lot like rosewood). The rosewood persists for a while before the drydown introduces amber and patchouli to "smooth things out". In the case of Tam Dao, the harsh pencil shaving cedar gives way to a somewhat similar drydown - the rosewood intermingles with ambergris to give birth to a sweet creamy accord.

    I am not a scent guru by any means, but these are my observations: Both Sandalo and Tam Dao smell a lot like Australian sandalwood to my nose. Theres nothing wrong with that - the sandalwood down-under may lack the medicinal depth and "magical aura" of the mysore oil, but it is a fine sandalwood blend in its own right (and easier on the nose if I may say so). Sandalo's drydown smells the closest to the Aussie blend to my nose - its less sweet and more "tart" than the aus santal. Sandalo may disappoint if you are looking for something close to the mysore oil mixed in with the composition (although none of the fragrances duplicate the mysore smell very well - Santal Imperial perhaps comes the closest). However, by all other accounts, Sandalo succeeds. The pairing of rosewood/sandalwood with a host of other uplifting and meditative notes like lavender, lemon, rose and neroli give it a certain brightness and spark. If Tam Dao left you wanting more, give Sandalo a try. While I much prefer Santal Imperials less cluttered but more accurate blend, Sandalo is worth seeking out if you are on a journey to find your HG. It may well suprise you.

    10th March, 2007

    Caltha's avatar

    Sweden Sweden

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    Derby by Guerlain

    Citrus, dry lichen and wood, bitter oakmoss, rubbery leather and an animal lurking underneath. I like the animal. The notes feel a little plasticky, or rather rubbery, but a great scent nonetheless.

    10th March, 2007

    vadim's avatar

    Russian Federation Russian Federation

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    Jardin du Nil by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Just barely street-legal and definitely not for the office what with the sweat, socks and decay overtones (see reviews below), but what a rewarding home-sniffer! In raw, bold strokes, Jardin du Nil paints the inner workings of an artisanal scentmaker's shop in the countryside: a mortar with some dark paste in it left unattended on a rough wooden table under a scorching sun, strewn petals, slowly decomposing fruits, humus soil, some earthy vetiver, a bit of iris root perhaps, phials with exotic essential oils… Evocative, bold and different, but one star off for nearly total unwearability.

    10th March, 2007

    bonzo's avatar

    Germany Germany

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    Givenchy III by Givenchy

    great and outstanding feminine scent!as it has been said: floral, green chypre fragrance.classical and elegant for a real woman- this is not agirl´s scent-this is a scent for a sophisticated and feminine woman!superb!

    10th March, 2007

    nyneve's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Eau Libre by Yves Saint Laurent

    It was a perfume light, green, fresh, not too hesperydaceous (?), one of first perfums unisex.
    Jazz is the bad copy.
    30 years later, is in my mind as one of symbols New Age

    10th March, 2007

    Andrewthecologneguy's avatar

    Nigeria Nigeria

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    L'Eau Bleue D'Issey pour Homme by Issey Miyake

    I commented on this a few months ago...(same guy, lost my password) anyway, for those who don't like this, again, I say be patient with it. If you want something you can spray right out of the bottle, go with l'eau bleue d'Issey eau fraiche. Same scent but much ligter with a hint of mint/peppermint.
    If you already have the bottle and you are annoyed everytime you look at it, try mixing a little bit with Burberry Weekend...the mix is simply heavenly. Try it!

    10th March, 2007

    Andrewthecologneguy's avatar

    Nigeria Nigeria

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    Eau Parfumée au Thé Rouge by Bulgari

    This is a weired one, for me anyway. Nothing fruity at all, just all tea with a synthetic something I can't quite put my finger on. Either way, SOIR PH by the same Bulgari is far better.

    10th March, 2007

    Andrewthecologneguy's avatar

    Nigeria Nigeria

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    L'Eau D'Issey pour Homme Summer 2006 by Issey Miyake

    I really like IM PH products, but you know, I tihnk the hype needs to go. How many remixes can you do from the same scent? IM, you need to leave that to Liz Claiborne and the Curve line.
    Anyway, I noticed Summer 2006 is no longer in production according to Basenotes...and I think I know why. It smells like windex!!!
    It's a good thing I like the smell of windex sans the ammonia, and I have secretly wished somebody would do so...so here is my vote of thanks to IM for making it a reality. If does smell like the original, just lighter and with a touch of windex.
    I guess if the original is too strong for you, then there are quite a few variants you can choose from.

    10th March, 2007

    Andrewthecologneguy's avatar

    Nigeria Nigeria

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    Bulgari pour Homme Soir by Bulgari

    I actually like this one, though not a lot of people do. I guess it depends on your skin. If you like a nice tea scent this is quite nice. Not the greatest compared to other Bulgari scents, however, if those didn't work for you, this might, it did for me.

    10th March, 2007

    Andrewthecologneguy's avatar

    Nigeria Nigeria

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    Dunhill Pursuit by Dunhill

    Just as I was complaining about nothing new for men that is truly manly (flowery for men needs to end now!) I came across Pursuit, and I must say, this is well done. It reminds me of something from waaay back, maybe late '70s but modernised and well balanced. It really shines in its mid-notes, speaking of notes this is what I found:
    'An oriental, woody fragrance with tropical green pineapple, green leaves, orange leaves, cedar, sandalwood, musk, amber and smoldering incense.'

    It's not sickly fresh or cloying, rather, it is macho with a nice guy feel. Mature, yet a 20 something guy like me would enjoy it.

    10th March, 2007

    dragoman's avatar

    United States United States

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    Rahät Loukoum by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    Used lightly, the cherries-and-cream aroma will develop beyond the Stewart's soda blast, making a calming scent envelopment for relaxation and study which I had previously experienced only with good Japanese bancha tea. Quite pleasant for private times.

    10th March, 2007

    Indiscreet's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Habit Rouge by Guerlain

    Overwhelming, astringent bergamot. I didn't get much apart from that. Not something I'd look at again.

    10th March, 2007

    Showing 301 to 330 of 1007.