Fragrance Reviews from January 2008

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    Leifer's avatar

    United States United States

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    Antidote by Viktor & Rolf

    Oops, did I say ROFL instead of Rolf? I think I did. The reason is because I laugh at this scent, which seems to have a split personality. Given the jaw-dropping list of ingredients that would fill up a short story with ease, it's safe to assume right off the bat that Antidote will run into some troubles with itself. Here's a perfect example; mint and grapefruit don't play well together; the menthol voids the citrus notes, and you end up with a flat, Kool-Aid type of sugar-scent. What's worse is mandarin and bergamot; when they both compete for top-dog of the top-notes, it ends up smelling like decomposing matter, aka feces, because our oranges don't take kindly to flat spices (I say flat in the sense that bergamot cannot stand on its own without the aid of other notes) that overpower notes that are meant to smooth out an opening. With the right proportions, the top could have been exquisite; V&R, if you're reading this, please lay off the bergamot and let the orange provide a silky-smooth carpet for the grapefruit to waltz on, while the mint touches it every now and then.

    Okay, so not a good start for our top notes. Hopefully our heart notes won't be as chock-full of "whatever" ingr-- nevermind, they are. Even in the heart, the ingredients are so sharp and so powerful, that it takes two of each family to get the message across - lavender and violet are BOTH used, while nutmeg AND cinnamon are both noticeable. I'm not saying that using nutmeg and cinnamon together is a bad combination; given the right styling, they can do amazingly well together, but V&R have different plans. You can assume that our base will be the same; there are more notes here than the middle or the top. The entire scent, right down the base, is uncoordinated and awkward. There is too much power in this scent, and not enough focus on empowering the qualities of each note. It's a slur of mintleavesitalianbergamotmandaringrapefruitguatema lancardamomfrenchlavendergeraniumnutmegcinnamonbar kfreesiaorangeblossomvioletamberindonesianpatchoul icistuslabdanumvanillairissandalwoodtexanwhiteceda rguaiacumwoodtreemossleatherwhitemuskandtonkabeans .

    Apparently, Viktor and Rolf are two people working on one fragrance without telling each other what they're putting in. Split the fragrance in half; take out the strongest and weakest top, heart, and base notes and you have something worthy of a basenoters collection. Really now, imagine an Antidote with grapefruit, subtle mint, violet, orange blossom, patchouli, musk, and a slight vanilla accord; and another Antidote with bountiful orange, a hint of bergamot, a dash of cardamom, nutmeg, peachy-light lavender, amber, white cedar, and tonka bean. Sounds appealing, yes? It does to this nose at least; but what isn't appealing is a mixture of two like-scents, which cancel out the beauties of the ingredients they possess.

    15 January, 2008

    Leifer's avatar

    United States United States

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    Hypnôse Homme by Lancôme

    Fasten your seatbelts, because Hypnose is in for a rough ride.

    This scent would be exquisite, with it's electrifying and vibrant bergamot / mint opening, coupled with a mandarin and cardamom whiff, on a heavy and empowering note of lavender. It would be stunning, with the amber bleeding through the heart of bergamot, and the patchouli flirting with the mint, while the musk accentuates the cardamom and mandarin. It would be a genuine treat; a sense-sizzling, sex-appealing, summer-time snowcone of sugary sweetness, except it's already been done. A lot. Too many times, in fact.

    What we have here is a Le Male; a dash short on the synthetic sweetness, only to be accentuated by a fresher accord of spices. Not quite as synthetic and choking as Le Male, but definitely much sharper on the nose, in a very citrus, lemony way. Oh my, what else do we have here... Au Masculin? Yes; void of the licorice and vanilla base, and instead, fond of light woods which allow the top notes to direct the drydown of the scent. Which is strange, considering the pyramid for Au Masculin doesn't resemble the structure of Hypnose (Le Male does, though. They both share bergamot, mint, cardamom, lavender, amber, and a little musk; albeit very synthetic in JPG's rendering).

    How then, do we arrive at such a conclusion? The answer is simple; while the top notes of Hypnose are somewhat related to Au Masculin, and the base is not, keep in mind that the top notes control the drydown in a scent where the heart and base are so weak, and the top notes are so strong. With Au Masculin, the progression is noticeable; your cedar and vanilla beat lighter top and heart notes out of the way and demand attention. Even to the heavy-hitting heart notes of violet (stronger than lavender), there is a very noticeable change. However, with Hypnose, the base notes are so weak, that the top notes remain dominant. There is no real progression, until it begins to fade away -- and that's the only real change.

    Amidst all of this, I do think there was some creativity involved. Hypnose stands out as a fragrance with a very long-lasting top, which controls the fragrance and drives the heart and base to feed it, rather than eventually settling and being replaced by other scents. I somewhat like it's monotony, because for what it is, it's well done. I would never buy a bottle; the diabetes-inducing sweets aren't my forte, but for someone who likes sweet scents that make Boucheron's Jaipur seem bitter, I recommend this one.

    15 January, 2008

    Leifer's avatar

    United States United States

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    Domenico Caraceni 1913 by Domenico Caraceni

    A rose scent with a dirty little secret, Domenico Caraceni 1913 blushes arrogant spices with mellow roses, and forms perhaps one of the most intriguing out of this batch, next to Lime Aoud. 1913 isn't quite as dirty and gritty as Voleur de Roses; nor is it as clean and fragile as Rose Poivree, it's somewhere in the middle. The similarities it has are very minor and superficial; 1913 stands out as its own bold and crafty scent.

    Right from the get-go, 1913 is set up to be a magnificent fragrance. The top notes are petitgrain and geranium, followed by a heart of bigarade, rose, and a little tobacco, falling on a base of frankincense and cypress. Just looking at those notes, we see an unusually exotic combination. And the scent just keeps getting more exotic! The initial spray is a deeply rich, aromatic mixture of petitgrain and geranium, which lasts for about three minutes, then something strange happens... a heart of rose springs up and begins to smoothen out the scent. This is the first peculiar thing; as top notes generally take ~ 15-20 minutes to vanish. In 1913, however, the rose springs out, but does not replace any of the top notes. It first blends in quite nicely, then begins to dominate the scent, as the top notes start to fade and are replaced by the heart of bigarade and tobacco. Surprisingly, the tobacco is very light and hardly noticeable next to the spiced accord of bigarade; perhaps to allow the sweeter base of frankincense and cypress to bleed through the transparency (tobacco is used as a "final" base note in most scents, because it tends to last longer than any other note, and it stays dominant the moment it's introduced) and shift the scent once again. As the heart dries down, a wonderfully potent, sugared note of frankincense yawns to life, and is anchored to woodsiness by cypress. Both notes accentuate the rose, and favor the progression of change... no longer is our rose so bold and dominant; rather, it has matured, and accepts the replacement of its life. Cypress begins to ebb away at it, as frankincense adds a grand finale of spicy-sweetness, and the roses die. Even after their death, though, there is a very subtle, smoothly aromatic sense of rose essence when the frankincense relaxes a little, and the cypress isn't so potent.

    One of the most flawless and effortless executions of a rose-guided scent, 1913 is my favorite [rose] scent; it's not safe and tranquil like Rose Poivree is, yet it's not raw and dirty like Voleur de Roses... but it's not quite the middle grounds, either. It's hard to describe this scent, due to it's peculiar construction and the way each note is played out, but the sheer intelligence and thought behind this, coupled with the unusual ingredients used, makes this yet another sure-buy, and a wallet-breaker at that...

    15 January, 2008

    Leifer's avatar

    United States United States

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    He Wood by Dsquared2

    What an usual scent we have present here... the moment I sprayed it on, three fragrances came to mind: Body Kouros, Au Masculin, and Hypnose. The opening notes were sharp and obtrusive; but lacking of any real oomph, which is the exact same that I get from BK. It should be strong and citrusy, with a powerful accord of bergamot spices and a lavender backdrop; but it's not. After a moment, that faded, and it was replaced by a very strong green ivy and rum scent; the intoxicatingly sweet (and alcohol-infused) notes blushed out that stale introduction, which were further sweetened by what appears to be some musk and bay leaves. A turn-around for the scent; whose opening was uninspiring and bland, but will it continue?

    Cascading through the heart, we begin to see that this won't be a spicy forest; rather, it is a clean cedar chest. So clean, in fact, that it's damn near sterile. A sprig of violet blossoms as the pseudo-BK/AM/Hypnose notes fade away, and the fir that replaces it propels the scent into a strong cedar base. As time passes, this scent gets even better, because the violet fades away, and you're left with just what you came for when you bought this scent -- cedar; and lots of it. There are no floral notes of violet, or any musk left; rather, there is just freshly-cut cedar, with a hint of pine and amber (to keep very little of the sweetness, so you don't smell like a lumberjack -- instead, you smell like a lumberjack wearing a tuxedo). The scent is relatively boring and uninteresting, in terms of development and complexity, but that's exactly what it needs to be in order to achieve the effect that it has. It's very clean, green, cedar-y, woodsy, and non-invasive to your nose. The woods aren't dark or dense; their whiffs are carried on the air, and you can tell there is a relatively transparent feel to this, which allows the scent to take control of the pine and use it in favor of the cedar.

    15 January, 2008

    Leifer's avatar

    United States United States

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    Equistrius by Parfum d'Empire

    An unbelievably smooth and fantastically neutral opening, thank you very much rice powder, paves the way for delicate and precious Orris notes to calm and sooth the nose. In Roman times, Orris was used in pharmaceutical environments to calm and relax the senses... and my oh my, that quality is ever so present in Equistrius. A soft, blushing note of violet caresses the rice powder, adding a hint of floral sweetness, while a beautiful note of ambrette butter soaks though and envelopes the scent, adding a divinely soothing quality. A soft, creamy chocolate anchors the light sweetness and adds an unusual texture, while Orris is allowed to work the mind in its heavenly ways. As lavender withers, and rice powders fades, the chocolaty-butter / Orris combination is accentuated, and further intensified by both sandalwood and vetiver, which serve to transform the scent into a woodsy-oriented juice, until the very end of the scent.

    Absolutely every ingredient is picked with a single goal in mind: to transform the scent, as a whole, from ordinary, into something of epic proportions. It seems as if any other ingredient would have negatively impacted the scent, or any tiny change or alteration in quantity would've resulted in something else. Once the strong Orris note blends quite well with the ambrette butter, the real magic occurs. There is such a different feeling to it, because the way it flirts with lavender as opposed to how it toys with the sandalwood and vetiver, is a very dramatic shift. It wouldn't seem like one, since they're mellow notes, but it's the unfathomable impact that the Orris has on the scent.

    This is absolutely indescribable, for once I'm flabbergasted and speechless. I can't think of the proper words, but a million thoughts are going through my head at once. I'm inspired by its glory, and everything I ever thought I knew about fragrances has changed. This is easily the most unique thing I have ever smelled in my entire existence. If God's divine armpit produced sweat, Equistrius would be the liquid that flowed from His glands.

    15 January, 2008

    Leifer's avatar

    United States United States

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    Outrageous! by Editions de Parfums Frederic Malle

    Outrageous is not a fragrance; it's a movie for your nose. Upon the first spritz, Johnny Appleseed awakes to a cheerful sun, and springs out of the bottle, dashing around on your wrist, playfully tossing seeds around, and allowing the crisp, green apple trees to bloom. The fertile soil supports the life of sweet mints, mouth-puckering limes, exquisite grapefruits, divine roses, and strangely enough, a social cinnamon which blends in quite well. As time progresses, the green apples, touched with spicy and fruity influences, drop from the tree of life. Their rich cores serve as nutrition for a hungry cedar, which creeps up gently; overshadowing the bountiful myriad of fresh tropics with it's own apple-influenced heart. Eventually, night settles, and cedar begins to creak and groan, as musk and moss crawl up bark and branch, until the scent remains no more.

    Watch out Christopher Brosius, Frederic Malles is playing ball in your apple field. Poetic isms aside, I think Outrageous is an extremely well done scent. Like most other creations from the FM line, there is undeniably a marvelous progression, and all the notes are felt for respective amounts of time. Typically, fruity scents that appeal to men have some sort of synthetic feel to it, to avoid an overdose on sweetness. The tendency is to try to use "strong" notes of fruit-and-floral ingredients, because they tend to die out fairly quickly (so more is better?), which results in either a very "feminine" perfume feel, or a dead-beat scent that lasts for less than an hour. Paradise for Men, by Alfred Sung, is a perfect example of a juicy papaya-grapefruit scent that has terrible lasting power, due to the lack of strong woods. Outrageous, however, manages to capture light and fresh fruits without overdoing it; and sustain that feel throughout the life of the fragrance, using a soft and indiscernible musk (remember, musk can be used to enhance the smell and life of other aromas) which is stamped with the green, fruity accord of apples. The rest of the top notes fade out, as they are replaced by woodsy heart and base notes, which blend together marvelously well, to give the impression of a spiced-apple type of concoction. On my skin, and to this nose, Outrageous is spiced apple cider, which is amazing, since I've never smelled apple cider on my skin before... and surely there must be few replications of a drink as a fragrance

    For all of its glory, there are some flaws... prior to this creation, the line of Frederic Malles was hardly recognizable as made by a mortal. The scents were so exquisite and well thought out, that we all assumed some divine influence was present during the development of our Noir Epices, Musc Ravageurs, and Carnal Flowers. But Frederic Malles has blinked, and we now see he is human; influenced by the ways of the industry today, he follows. The name, for example, really is Outrageous for such a prestigious line. I would've thought at least "Le Outrageous" would've sufficed; better yet, "Le Scandaleux", or a typical, abstract FM name, such as "Paradis céleste".

    15 January, 2008

    hester's avatar

    South Africa South Africa

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    So Pretty by Cartier

    This was my first real perfume, I think, given as a present by British friends (it can't be bought in South Africa). Very sweet and flowery, but with a lemony bite (the neroli and mandarin?) that prevents asphyxiation. It is actually more adult than I thought as a teenager, but certainly not for business suit-days! It has sillage in spades on me, so beware. Expensive-smelling sillage!

    15 January, 2008

    hester's avatar

    South Africa South Africa

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    No. 19 by Chanel

    The first real fragrance I bought myself, in the Galeries Lafayette, no less. I suspect I had Crystalle in mind, though, as this turned out no to be quite what I expected. I love the green aspects and the sharpness ( not soft of me at all, not remotely), but in the drydown the EDP sometimes, and only sometimes, goes very musty. I don't think it's a question of not liking 'older' perfumes, as it only happens sometimes. I'd say if you're in the market for crisp, interesting and ladylike, do give it a go.

    15 January, 2008

    hester's avatar

    South Africa South Africa

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    Rochas Femme (new) by Rochas

    This could not possibly be any better! I've heard all about the original version, but I just can't believe this could be improved upon! Sultry, warm, just like an almond slice, it's true, but an almond slice imbued with some mysterious pheromonal wonderfulness, creamy, intimate and unlike anything I've smelled. Couldn't be without a bottle ever again. Plus, I'm wearing it to work today, and have done before, and I don't think anyone's offended or even noticing, except if they're close. So maybe don't believe the stories about it being overpowering - try on yourself. Just TRY! Ten thumbs up.

    15 January, 2008

    hester's avatar

    South Africa South Africa

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    L'Instant de Guerlain pour Homme by Guerlain

    This was the yummiest thing on my boyfriend, and even though I was wearing the glorious Estee Lauder Private Collection Tuberose Gardenia, I felt quite upstaged by how fabulous he smelled! Perhaps a touch too sweet for him, was his opinion, and mine too: I want to wear it! Love the elegant bottle too. EDIT: So I tried it on last night, and it's LOVELY on me, and indeed, boyfriend again said it would be a touch sweet for him. I must say, I don't find it 'manly' at ALL. My grandmother or something in her home used to smell like this, so to me, it's just cuddly, safe, nice. Not too exciting, just NICE. Fabulous bottle!

    15 January, 2008 (Last Edited: 30th July, 2009)

    hester's avatar

    South Africa South Africa

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    L'Instant Magic by Guerlain

    BO-RING. Pass the baby powder, or if you don't have that on hand, L'Instant Magic will do. Really, just another crowdpleaser with no guts or heart.

    15 January, 2008

    hubert delauney's avatar

    United States United States

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    Occur! by Avon

    I just bought a bottle at a thrift shop that had a thick layer of congealed perfume in the bottom-- "Occur" It certainly did not ring a bell, and my wife had no clue either. The scent smelled like a beautiful strong oriental leather type of scent. We could really smell the carnation too- I am surprised that Avon made this, and the bottle is very Un-Avon like-very nice elegant bottle.

    15 January, 2008

    Jen81's avatar

    United States United States

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    Paris Hilton by Paris Hilton

    I got a chance to get a whiff of this a couple of years ago, and I wasn't overly impressed with the scent. It was pretty much like every other cheap fruity floral that I had been sniffing at the time.

    This is something that I would not suit anyone my age or older, but I think it could work on someone younger - being that it's the kind of scent that is geared toward that market.

    I have to agree with Lavenderose that all this fragrance basically is, in essence, is a marketing ploy to get more money for spoiled young rich girl to glean MORE money off of her minions.

    Sad, truly sad.

    15 January, 2008

    Jen81's avatar

    United States United States

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    Juicy Couture by Juicy Couture

    Without asking I got a sample of this from the sales person working the counter, who was really quite nice. To date I still have the sample that was given to me, as well as the lotion sample.

    As Ubuandime mentioned in her review of this fragrance, it's definitely one that'll make you feel like you've just got socked in the nose - my nose was aching for hours on end after smelling this! It's a fragrance that's a bit too intensely sweet, and the warm undercurrent of the fragrance doesn't do too much for me either.

    I will agree that the bottle is cute for vanity purposes, but personally the juice within the bottle just doesn't do it for me, and think it would be a waste of money for me just to buy it for the bottle alone.

    15 January, 2008

    Excelsior's avatar

    United States United States

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    Jacomo de Jacomo Rouge by Jacomo

    There are a lot of nice notes in this. Unfortunately, I don't get any of them when I wear it. The "initial citrus burst" is mostly drowned out by the smell of denatured alcohol, and it doesn't last long enough into the dry-down for me to really appreciate it. After that, it's all sandalwood and incense, with the incense note really dominating over everything else. That said, it is a very nice incense note, rendered slightly feminine by the florals and softened by the vanilla. It smells a bit like a high-end antique shop. It carries well while the fragrance lasts, which is not very long. Overall, it's nice enough, but I don't find it very memorable.

    15 January, 2008

    Bromo33333's avatar

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    M7 by Yves Saint Laurent

    Wow! It is a STRONG scent - harsh even at first. And the sillage - people will know you put it on three houses down! (Well thats an exaggeration, but it is very very strong).

    It is intriguing, and it really takes some chances, and pulls them off for the most part, but it is not a general purpose scent - good for night, NEVER for the office. It lasts a long time.

    A reviewer said "go easy on the trigger, a little goes a long way" - and is 100% correct. Do a single puff in front of you and go into the cloud. That should be sufficient.

    15 January, 2008

    LuciusVorenus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Canoé by Dana

    This is an awful perfume. It is very artificial, like one of those awful medications that your grandma gave you when you were a kid.

    I want to get rid of my bottle.

    15 January, 2008

    LuciusVorenus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Givenchy Gentleman by Givenchy

    This perfume scares the hell out of you for the first 5 minutes. It is too strong and beastly. But after a few minutes you get a good payoff, and a lovely combination of Patchouli and vetiver stands out, with a touch of leather. It is a sophisticated perfume, very manly, classic and conservative. Not for the young boys.

    15 January, 2008

    LuciusVorenus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Jovan Musk for Men by Jovan

    It smells like a cheap, weird soap. It is artificial and reminds me of rubber, mixed with something medicinal.

    15 January, 2008

    Allen-on-Holiday's avatar

    United States United States

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    Midnight Pomegranate by Bath and Body Works

    The opening notes are wonderful, it's a shame the basenotes ruin it. Imagine dark fruit (not real pomegranate, but something better). Smells "purple" to me. It's really shameful that so many wonderful fragrances are ruined by basenotes of musk and vanilla (and tobacco in this one!). Drydown smells like a very cheap ladies perfume. But the first few minutes are unique.

    The above review is from years ago. Yes, the first few minutes are amazing, but the drydown isn't as bad as I originally thought. This unisex fragrance is definitely something every other guy out there isn't wearing. And often I smell quite a bit of cinnamon in it. In fact, if it weren't for the tobacco leaf (not tobacco) and patchouli (and anise is listed), it would be too feminine to wear, in my opinion. However, "Midnight" Pomegranate is actually more of a bright, daytime scent.

    15 January, 2008 (Last Edited: 10th August, 2014)

    odysseusm's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Woods of Windsor for Men / Gentleman by Woods of Windsor

    Woods of Windsor for Gentlemen (vintage) is a striking sort of scent. It is distinctive – and I would say commendable – for NOT having any softening or often heavy elements so often found in men’s fragrances. There are no florals, nor is there any vanilla, patchouli or amber. What results is a classy and very dry spicy-wood scent. It is earthy and robust, but it is not sweet or heavy. The initial citrus phase is brief. The next phase is a citrus-spice mélange. The spices are peppery (nutmeg) and sharp (clove) and give a charming, old-school ‘barbershop’ vibe. These aromatics blend well into the third phase, a spicy wood. I can’t identify the particular wood; it fills a supportive rather than starring role. Despite being inexpensive, it has good quality and is thus very good value. The EdT is accompanied by a variety of related toiletry products (shower gel, aftershave, talc) . I think it is worth seeking out if you like a dry, spicy wood scent.
    Update - I have the vintage juice. The citrus notes, especially the lemongrass, work nicely with the very well-constructed spice notes. This is a very dry and classy scent, amazing value. I recently acquired the talc which I can see is in the reformulated version. It is OK, but has a less refined aura, more rubbery (from the patchouli) and earthy (from the moss). One way to identify the two versions is the label. The old label has a picture of a castle turret. The new version has the castle but also a stylized motif, the "tribal tattoo" or stylized green man as noted in another view.

    15 January, 2008 (Last Edited: 24 August, 2014)

    coolnose's avatar

    Morocco Morocco

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    Polo Explorer by Ralph Lauren

    I have never owned a RL fragrance and this is one extra reason not to. The annoying thing is that this is not overly horrible, in fact its OK. But where I'd like to pick a bone with Mr. Lauren is that I'm sure this resembles every other mens frag out there. I know, heard many times before, but its true. Boring, sweetish / fresh opening then a woody development with some leather in the base. Explorer? No way, its for young dudes out clubbing or on date. Neutral for the frag itself, negative cos its no way a new olfactory experience.

    16 January, 2008

    tvlampboy's avatar

    United States United States

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    Borneo 1834 by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    I seldom do this (seldom if ever), but here's where I have to step in and say, "Basically what foetidus just said." Really.

    The chocolate/patchouli mixture in Borneo 1834 is very handsome, granted, but the chocolate itself falls short and the patchouli just smells like good quality, uncut patchouli oil. I just kept expecting more from this fragrance, esp. since it's from Lutens' ultra-premium non-export line.

    Those who know me know how much I am repulsed by A*men, and it's true that Borneo is a stripped down version thereof. But what's missing (obviously) is that vile burnt tar note that makes A*men so utterly unwearable for me. (Small doses I can take -- witness Black Jeans. Huge doses make me ill, esp. when coupled with tonka.)

    The camphor doesn't bother me, but it's not even strong enough to notice -- at least not on my flesh. Same with the honey, and it's something that I usually love. Here (as opposed to Miel de Bois, obviously), it just barely factors into the equation.

    I really, really want to love this Lutens frag -- it got me lots of compliments today! (And I AM a frag whore deluxe.) Still, though, I just find it lacking at the end of the day, especially for the exorbitant price it commands.

    16 January, 2008

    tvlampboy's avatar

    United States United States

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    Fougères Marines by Montale

    Stardust it is, with just a nod of the head in GIT's general direction.

    Fan of Llewellyn but don't want to pay the price? Snag a bottle of Fougères Marines and spritz away!

    16 January, 2008

    tvlampboy's avatar

    United States United States

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    Moss Breches by Tom Ford

    Mean green sexy machine! A classic chypre, with a blast of tarragon and sage to open your sinuses at first. From there, it's all about the labdanum, spices (can't quite put my finger on them, though), patchouli and benzoin.

    What comes to mind first and foremost for me is the old Givenchy Gentleman -- I get much of that with the patchouli-heavy drydown. Still, this has no civet that I can detect (unlike Gentleman) and a slightly more unisex dry-down.

    Gorgeous "dark" green frag, but the price tag (as with the other Tom Fords in this line) is, for me, prohibitive. (A huge thumbs up, though!)

    16 January, 2008

    tvlampboy's avatar

    United States United States

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    Steam Aoud by Montale

    A very pretty oud-based frag, albeit more subtle than Black Aoud, that powerhouse. Imagine Black Aoud with less rose and more sandalwood. The oud is equally medicinal, yes, but its incredible dry-down is equal to that of the other Montale ouds I've sampled (including BA). The cumin note is a tad off-putting at first (as in Rive Gauche pour Homme and Greyland), but you soon figure out why it was necessary in the first place (i.e., to help cut the sweetness/sharpness of the oud and roses in the opening).

    16 January, 2008

    tvlampboy's avatar

    United States United States

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    parfums*PARFUMS Luxe: Champaca by Comme des Garçons

    Decadent and lush indeed! Massive amounts of tuberose here, so opponents of white florals had best beware.

    To quote the inimitable Vibert, "while wearing Luxe Champaca I feel a bit like a debauched and aging drag queen who's trying just a bit too hard to channel Lauren Bacall." LOLOLOL -- I couldn't have said it better myself!

    All that aside, suffice it to say that this one is a) far too feminine for me for everyday wear and b) too expensive for everyday wear, to boot. (But I'm sure going to enjoy the hell out of my sample!)

    16 January, 2008

    tvlampboy's avatar

    United States United States

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    Immortelle L'Amour by Ayala Moriel

    An immortelle fragrance for those who hated Sables. Really. Very food-y take on the note without the "syrup" effect of Annick Goutal's much loved/much hated rendition on the same theme.

    The tea note is prominent, and its tannic quality helps to mute (what would otherwise be) the cloying sweetness of the cinnamon and vanilla.

    A comforting, sexy, intimate frag that Ayala should, by all rights, be marketing to men as well as women. GORGEOUS stuff!

    16 January, 2008

    kharisma92's avatar

    United States United States

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    Herrera for Men by Carolina Herrera

    I can not understand what I liked about this juice when I bought it in 1993. YUK,YUK,YUK.........

    16 January, 2008

    kharisma92's avatar

    United States United States

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    Nicole Miller for Men by Nicole Miller

    I still have a 3/4 of a bottle left of this awesome juice. If you can somehow find a bottle of this I advise you to get some. Because of it's scarceness I only wear it in the summer.

    16 January, 2008

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