Fragrance Reviews from May 2008

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    Noseworthy's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Je Reviens by Worth

    A total classic. And totally timeless. Different from any other fragrance on the market, yet subdued and comforting: the kind of scent that brings a smile to the wearer and her ambiance. Not overtly sexy, but sensual, and one of those perfumes that one can remember just by thinking about it. Good for all ages, but works best with the mature and sophisticated. Might work for some men, but use caution.

    16th May, 2008

    twinpeaker's avatar

    United States United States

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    Costes by Hôtel Costes

    Wow was my initial reaction. I had just been trying Amouage Jubilation XXV and then tried this. Shall we compare and contrast, kids? Amouage was dense and smokey, full of incense, dark and mysterious, and incredibly complex. It is a liaison in winter under fur in front of a roaring fire with your clandestine lover. Not something I could pull off every day. So the contrast to Costes was shocking to me. Costes is stepping out of the hot Mediterranean sun and into the cool foyer of grand old hotel, the curtains gently billowing in the breeze. On me, it opens with a refreshing burst of citrus, clove and pepper. Shimmering underneath are fresh florals (bay leaf and lavender), it is very clean and smooth at the same time. SMOOOOOOOTH. In the dry down I'm more aware of sandalwood and a subtle animalic muskiness that anchor the fresh crisp topnotes and keep this fragrance on firmly unisex ground.

    Classy, sexy, refreshing and smooth. Definitely a summer fragrance. This could be my new daily scent.

    16th May, 2008

    dainty's avatar



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    Fleur D'Interdit by Givenchy

    i love this scent. it reminds me of high school days. but it is hard to find nowadays

    16th May, 2008

    ohiolee's avatar

    United States United States

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    Ode by Guerlain

    when will guerlain reissue Ode?
    have been hearing they will for sometime;but so far no news
    i remember how impressive this fragrance was in the60's-70's
    eclipes joy by leaps and bounds allthough similar

    16th May, 2008

    Ayala's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Grand Amour by Annick Goutal

    From the first second I smelled Grand Amour, I knew I could not remain indifferent to this perfume. It reminded me instantly of the bushes of mastic where I used to hide as a little girl: either from friends and siblings while playing hide and seek; or from greater horrors imposed on little children by the adults of the world. The scent of the mastic bushes is unique and unmistakable. And although mastic is not mentioned as a note in this perfume from Annick Goutal – the precise makeup of this particular perfume creates the impression of the scent released from the crushed crisp leaves between little fingers of a child hiding in the dense evergreen bushes.

    The gum or resin from this bush is the same “mastic” which is used to flavour baked sweets and ice creams in the Middle East and Greece (more about this later). The Latin name of this bush is Pistacia Lentiscus, and it is from the pisttachio family. In ancient times it was used to create a chewing substance (mastic is chewing gum in Arabic and Hebrew), and it is also used as a medicine and a spice. A synthetic substance with similar chemical makeup is created especially for the chewing gum industry.

    For those who are unfamiliar with the aroma of mastic, and particularly that of the raw leaves, I would try to describe it as it is in Grand Amour: it is green yet not like grass or leaves, sappy, but not resinous, and with an undercurrent of powdery warmth, while releasing a gently and evenly floral aroma in such manner that no particular flower stands out. It also resembles Chamade in some ways, though I detect none of the galbanum, oakmoss or vanilla notes that are so prominent in Chamade. Perhaps it is the hyacinth, a note that appears in both perfumes.

    When I discovered Grand Amour some two or three years ago at The Bay in Vancouver, I immediately lavished myself in it carelessly in excess that can be only explained by my excitement. I was not able to enjoy it very much, the memory of those evergreen childhood hideaways brought a throat-clenching sensation, like the one that visits us just before bursting into inexplicable, shameful tears. I neglected the fantasy of wearing Grand Amour, but haven’t completely given up. I took a vial with me on my trip to Israel this spring, and decided to wear it in the natural environment and compare it to the live bush. I was right about their similarity. But imagine my surprise when I managed to enjoy the juice for three days straight while staying at my Mom’s place, surrounded by the bushes and the spring blooming greenery. In Hebrew we say “Meshane makom, meshane mazal” which means, that when you change location or place, your luck might change too. So true for perfume.

    This review is for the Eau de Toilette, which is lovely in my opinion except for the fact that it is not extremely long lasting when dabbed. When sprayed the performance is excellent. The official notes (per the Annick Goutal website) are lily, hyacinth, honeysuckle, Turkish rose, amber, musk and myrtle.

    17th May, 2008

    Ayala's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    En Avion by Caron

    In the first decades of aviation, when we were all blinded by the glare of heroism and miraculous ascent of human spirit above the clouds, defying gravity and other enemies – aviation has inspired art – including books (Antoine de Saint Exupéry, an aviator, spy and an author, has written several books inspired by the topic). And lastly there are two grand perfumes inspired by aviation – En Avion (Ernest Daltroff, 1932), dedicated to the pioneer female aviators mentioned above – Bolland, Boucher and Bastié; and the infamous Vol de Nuit (Jacques Guerlain, 1933), inspired by the book of the same name by the abovementioned aviator-author, which I have already reviewed on this humble blog.

    En Avion opens dark, like all Caron extraits, and with a certain bittersweetness that does remind me somewhat of Vol de Nuit (though I have to admit, the only reason I compare the two is because of their common theme). While Vol de Nuit is green and sharp, herbaceous at first – En Avion is far more spicy and floral. It starts off soapy and spicy at the same time. Carnation is apparent immediately, but so is orange flower, which smells like an echo of l’Heure Bleue with pilot-hat and goggles… Although Vol de Nuit has the signature powderiness from the classic Guerlinade and iris notes engrained within its structure; En Avion takes powderiness nearly into central stage, and in a far softer and lady-like olfactory context: rose, lilac and violet, and underlined with powdery opoponaxs which almost instantly bring to mind the scent of vintage face powder. As for the base of En Avion, it is redolent of Atlas cedarwood with its suave, polished olfactory-texture, a bittersweetness of tonka bean (again, a reminder of of Vol de Nuit; but let’s not forget that En Avion preceded Vol de Nuit’s launch by a year…). There is, however, a subtle presence of burnished leather at the base, however it is not as animalic or leathery as other Caron creations (i.e.: Narcisse Noir, Tabac Blond), it is almost as soft as suede… If Vol de Nuit is a wild, ambitious woman with restrained emotions and top-notch professionalism; En Avion is not any less ambitious woman that secretly displays her femininity even when boarding an airplane for what might be her last flight ever… Underneath the pilot jumper, she is still wearing silk stockings and laced lingerie.

    According to the Perfume Addicts database, the notes are:
    Top notes: Rose, Neroli, Spicy Orange
    Heart notes: Jasmine, Carnation, Lilac, Violet
    Base notes: Opoponax, Amber, Musk, Wood

    To that I would add that in the top notes I can smell orange blossom rather than neroli (there is a different between the two!), I can't say I'm particularly smelling orange (there is a citrusy freshness, but it is well hidden with all the additional dense notes); and there is definitely a dry allspice note weaved in, as well as cloves and perhaps even a hint of nutmeg. While I can't say I smell much of the lilac (I would have to go back to it once I'm fully recovered from my cold though...), violet and rose have a strong presence, and so is the carnation. The base is neither particularly musky nor ambery; but there is certainly the animalic powderiness of opoponax weaved into a dry tobacco-leather base that might include castoerum, and the woods in question are the beautiful Moroccan cedarwood from the Atlas mountains.

    17th May, 2008

    Ayala's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Bois Farine by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    Jean Claude Ellena’s creation of Bois Farine for l’Artisan Parfumeur is said to be inspired by the flower of the “Flour Tree” that is genuine to the Réunion islands. The tree bears red flowers with a distinct floury, starchy aroma. The perfume almost lives up to this premise, commencing with an accord of fennel and white starchy wheat flour going up your nostrils and you knead that dough or visit the local miller to pick up freshly ground flour. It also has an aftertaste of crushed raw peanuts at first – oily and subtly earthy, barely detectable aroma. However, it quickly turns into an iris perfume, slightly floral and sweet with notes of cedar and musk and slightly vanillic underpinnings, not unlike Hiris, which reminded me of certain semolina patties, and not unlike Bvlgari au The Blanc with its underlining heliotrope and white musk sweetness (also by Jean Claude Ellena).

    17th May, 2008

    Ayala's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Biche Dans l'Absinthe by Gobin Daudé

    Doe through the Artemisia bushes… Her coat glows in the warm autumnal sun. Freedom is happiness. And the single notion that being is all there is to life.

    Victoire Gobin-Daudé, a gifted French independent perfumer, who unfortunately whose line was discontinued, unfortunately, uses only natural essences in the five perfumes she released to the world to enjoy for a limited period of time.

    Biche dans l’Absinthe offers yet another perspective to the bittersweetness of green and aromatic fougeres: the pairing of animalic with herbaceous.

    Opening with sweaty notes of cumin and the underlining warmth of immortelle, the doe has just paused from a brisk morning gallop in fields of semi-dry hay. It is mid Autumn, and the first sunrays are warming her shiny coat, releasing steam of animal sweat and morning dew from the surrounding vegetation. Citrus notes play a subtle role of diffusing the bitterness of Artemisia (absinthe) while bergamot creates a soft powdery aura, complementary to the cumin.
    There is a hint of floral in the heart, alongside the Artemisia. It might be orange blossom, or perhaps neroli. It is very subtle and is present only to soften and blend the phases together. The base is at once dry and sweet – with dried tobacco leaves, the abovementioned immortelle and its animalic yet herbaceouse-dry sweetness, and hay of course, for a good measure of coumarin and nourishment for the doe so she can run freely on my skin for hours to come.

    Top notes: Lemon, Cumin, Bergamot, Lemon Leaf
    Heart notes: Artemisia (Absinthe), Neroli, Lavender Absolute
    Base notes: Tobacco, Immortelle Absolute, Hay Absolute

    17th May, 2008

    Ayala's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Sel de Vetiver by The Different Company

    The concept of using minerals as a theme in perfume is relatively new. Although there are distinct mineral notes in perfumes such as Aqua Allegoria Pampeloune (Sulfur) and l’Eau d’Issey (Chlorine), the mineral presence in these fragrances was kept hush-hush only to be noticed by the keen noses; Yet the Elena family seems to be taking this concept into a whole different direction, spearheading the elemental or mineral movement in perfumery, with Sel de Vetiver by Celine Elena (Salt) and Terre d’Hermes by Jean-Claude Elena (Flint) and in general by their minimalist approach that is more mineral than organic.

    Sel de Vetiver (Vetiver Salt) from The Different Company meant to evoke the barely-there scent of ocean salt on a sun warmed skin. Although I can understand the salty reference and association with vetiver, warm it is not. Rather, it’s a cool, dusty vetiver with a clean earthy presence. It may recall the gritty, ground-sea-shells sand, salt sticking to driftwood and the rough dryness of skin that was soaked and masked with mud, salt and sulfur for too long. But it does not quite smell like salt or skin.

    Sel de Vetiver opens with an astringent, clean accord of grapefruit, ginger and a hint of cardamom that reminds me roasted dark coffee more than the spice itself. I can smell hints of ylang ylang, but they are not obvious at all, being rather heady and fleeting. Other notes that are mentioned are orris and geranium, but I can’t say I was aware of their presence at any given point. Vetiver and refined patchouli (smells more like a patchouli isolate rather than the full-bodied oil) step in pretty fast and dominate Sel de Vetiver for most of its life on the skin – the sweet, clean scent of these two earthy essences combined.

    Top notes: Grapefruit, Ginger, Cardamom
    Heart notes: Ylang Ylang, Geranium Bourbon, Orris
    Base notes: Vetiver, Patchouli

    17th May, 2008

    Ayala's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Wild Thing by Rich Hippie

    After long procrastination, I have finally got my hands on some samples of Rich Hippie’s perfumes, thanks to a kind swapper via MUA. While Utopia left me only slightly uplifted (notes of yuzu do that to you) from my current state; and Nirvana left me bored – Wild Thing was the one to grab my attention, instantly (and no, it was not because of its steep price point). Wild Thing is as close as a natural perfume ever got to Patou’s infamous “Joy” (at its time bearing slogan “the most expensive perfume in the world”). But the two have more in common than their price. They both celebrate the luscious beauty of jasmine and rose. In Wild Thing, there is hardly anything else (a little bit of citrus, and a very subtle orris note). The rose almost gets lost in the bush of sultry, penetrating jasmine. The indole is intoxicating and beautiful. Wild thing is rich (not in a monetary way) but not overpowering kind of floral and while very animalistic it is never repulsively so. Despite the fact that there is no civet at the base to my knowledge (which is what makes Joy parfum slightly “dirty”) – you get a similar vibe from the dry down of Wild Thing – it’s always jasminey and quite long lasting; though I can’t really tell what is it in the base that make it linger so long (no particular note stands out enough to be noticed, aside from the rose and the jasmine; and whatever iris there is there – it is very subtle, which makes me wonder if it is not used merely as a fixative). To the flower girl within me, Wild Thing is pure bliss and thankfully it is not in the least “hippie”.

    17th May, 2008

    Ayala's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Le Petit Prince by Le Petit Prince

    Le Petit Prince was never really a children’s book. Just because it is about a child does not make it for children. Regardless if the book is accompanied by colourful illustrations. I am sure my parents were not the only ones puzzled by the peculiar gap between their astonishment from the book and the complete non-comprehensive gazing they received from me and the too many questions for a bed time story as a response to this book.

    And so, when a disnified collection of perfumes for children inspired by Le Petit Prince came out, accompanied by stuffed animals (sheep, of course), action books colouring books and other cutesy paraphernalia (this is clearly TOO MUCH!) appeared on the olfactory horizon, I was equally eager and terrified to try the line.

    Eager? Well, one must admit, the packaging for Le Petit Prince Eau de Toilette is stunning. It is simple and true to the original illustrations in the book. One would expect a magical, yet somewhat cerebral concoction of baobab trees, star dust and desert winds and perhaps also a bit of motor oil. However, the perfumer for Le Petit Prince decided to go for the safest unisex cliché of a citrus perfume that gives no particular statement except for being an agreeable, pleasant smell. The chosen notes are mainly lemony, and for the most part this alcohol-free concoction smells like sugar-free lemonade. Very pleasant, but it gives nothing new to the imagination and being associated with a book of such importance, this is sacrilege. Let’s just be reminded that another book by the same author served as the inspiration to one of the greatest perfumes of all times, Vol de Nuit. This thought alone makes me shudder.

    Le Petit Prince Eau de Toilette is alcohol free. It is also free of any imaginative thought or creativity (except for that which went into the exquisite packaging). The official notes include citrus, tarragon, lemon verbena, cedarwood and oak. I smell mostly lemon and lemon verbena, which I love. But I can also find these without getting my plane grounded in the desert and insulting the olfactory intelligence of children (who, I am most certain, will be quite open to try some new notes that they are less familiar with).

    17th May, 2008

    Ayala's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Deseo by Jennifer Lopez

    Ever since I watched Jennifer Lopez’s mind blowing performance in U-Turn, I’ve been waiting for something like this to happen in her perfume line. I know, this is a rather nive wishful thinking, but we can all dream a little… I don’t know what the future holds for the J. Lo perfume line, but so far the only one I can smell myself wearing is the newest one - Deseo. That is not to say that Deseo is even remotely close to mind blowing in perfume terms. But at least it’s nice to find a fragrance to like bearing the name of such a talented actress (and I do prefer Ms. Lopez acting than her music). However, while Glow was too soapy, Still just not interesting, Miami Glow mouthwateringly artificial (and so were most of the others to follow – Live and the rest of the limited edition sequels for Glow) – Deseo is easily wearable and falls exactly into the fragrance category I would have belong to if I was the typical modern woman of my typical social cross section (which I’m not).

    Deseo joins the growing family of modern chypres, and to me smells like a hybrid between Pure Turquoise and With Love (Hilary Duff). It starts fresh and citrusy, yet not as brisk as Pure Turquoise. It brings forth some milky notes, but is not quite as milky as With Love, as it stirs towards beachy coconut-milk, skin and sand notes. The floral heart is obscure and I can’t say I recognize any particular note, but if you are familiar with star jasmine, this might be the only thing I can somehow relate to that resembles a living flower. Star jasmine is not a true jasmine, and has a fresh, fleeting green-floral note. It is easy to see why it’s getting so popular with recent fragrances released – it’s a white floral sans the drama, i.e. with the indole left out. The underlining notes are not any more articulate than the heart notes – mostly musks and woods of vague origin, yet upon dry down the oakmoss starts to really shine through, which is very encouraging for all of us true chypre lovers who are being fed a non-oakmoss chypre diet for quite some time…

    Judging by the packaging and name (Deseo means desire in Spanish) is meant to symbolize something deeper than it may seem – the bottle being in the shape of a diamond in the rough, and that got to have some deeper meaning in regards to Ms. Lopez’ life story, perhaps even with some implications to other diamonds out there yet to be discovered... What I’m smelling though, is fresh citrus notes of no particular identity, slightly beachy with nice smelling yet nondescript floral bouquet, over woody and and slightly warm and skin like base anchored in moss and salty mineral notes. The base would definitely suit a man very well. It is simple, clean, easy to wear (even more easy to wear than Pure Turquoise), cool yet neither aloof nor distant, fun but not overly beach, serene without being pretentious - and that is precisely what I like about Deseo. After all, any diamond, even a diamond in the rough, is just a cold stone and unless it's adorning a certain piece of jewelry...

    17th May, 2008

    Ayala's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Spanish Moss by Hové Parfumeur

    Spanish Moss is described by Hove Parfumeur as “Warm and exotic, mossy and green... a reformulation of an old favorite” – while it is warm, it is not what I would describe as green. It is sweet, powdery yet with an exotic twist as it includes some notes that are not commonly used in other rosy-powdery perfumes.
    Floral, powdery, sweet and with an antique Victorian feel. If there is moss there, it is well concealed, amongst heaps of flowers, dusting powder and rouge on a cluttered vanity table of a Southern lady who protects her fair skin with endless layers of lace and mousseline. The intensity of flowers and powder is something I’ve smelled before in perfumes that came from the South (Such as from Lagniappe Oakes Perfumery – I’ve tried several of these but I have to admit none captured my heart; they were all from the “Heirloom Collection”).
    The opening is intensely floral, sweet and powdery. I can sense the presence of heliotrope right away, with its bittersweet, almondy-rich melancholy. Other notes that are apparent from the start are lilac, rose, osmanthus and orange blossom. These are all very intense, dense once applied – buy when they settle on the skin they become far more tolerable – yet nonetheless maintain the same character of uber-sweet-powdery Southern vanity.
    Once the florals quiet down a tad, I find myself suddenly sipping icy-cold, sweet lemonade. Or perhaps it is a lemon popsicle… It instantly reminds me of Aunt Eller in Oaklahoma! film, though I don’t know why. I can’t even remember if there was any lemonade in that movie, but for some reason it makes sense. Even though it’s not even close to New Oreleans at all.
    Hours later, I am still searching for that “Spanish Moss” to come out from its hiding, but I can’t say there is anything particularly mossy about this perfume. It is very old fashioned, like a more tropical interpretation of “Lipstick Rose” and also more complex, less simplistic than rosy perfumes of that genre. Besides the heliotrope base, I can smell some bitter myrrh, but that’s as close as I can get to revealing the moss…
    Top notes: Lilac, Lemon
    Heart notes: Rose, Orange Blossom, Osmnathus, Orris
    Base notes: Heliotrope, Myrrh, Vanilla

    17th May, 2008

    coolnose's avatar

    Morocco Morocco

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    Versace pour Homme by Versace

    It would be easy to put this down as yet another 'fresh, spicy, woody' fragrance, because that's what it essentially is. However, it has a uniqueness which sets it apart from similar scents. For example, I compared it to D&G Light Blue, which is similar in the top and midnotes. However, where the D&G dries to a boring and somewhat synthetic note, the Versace seems to retain its freshness all the way to the drydown. I can still smell the neroli and bergamot down there; this is rare as most citrus notes vanish within minutes. I thus like this scent, whilst nothing new as such, does its job of being fresh and not being in anyone's face as sillage is moderate. A very good, safe buy scent ideally for the summer.

    17th May, 2008

    Indie_Guy's avatar

    United States United States

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    Play by Comme des Garçons

    Outstanding.

    I just got a sample of it today and it initially gave me deja vu. It reminded me of "T" by Tommy Hilfiger (the one that smells like a freshly washed t-shirt). However, the notes that rumble along under the bright sunny surface are nice and edgy-- A bit of burned rubber to go with a clean shirt. Very nice. I'd buy a bottle right now if the design on the bottle didn't look like some John Wayne Gacy clown nightmare. Still, it smells great.

    17th May, 2008

    JaimeB's avatar

    United States United States

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    Monsieur de Givenchy by Givenchy

    A very clean, gentlemanly scent featuring lemon and verbena notes, ably supported by lavender and spice, a hint of fresh floral, and an oakmoss-woody drydown. An eau de cologne-style scent whose sandalwood, oakmoss, and musk base gives it a hint of the oriental genre. Very classic and chic, it has a minimalist feel that makes it seem much more modern than the Cold War baby it is. At almost fifty years old, it is still in style today.

    17th May, 2008 (Last Edited: 03rd November, 2009)

    pince_nez's avatar

    United States United States

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    M7 by Yves Saint Laurent

    This scent is not for the faint of heart. Intense/deep and dark, this oozes in-your face masculinity.
    Dramatic sillage and stays on your skin for a very long time. This is agarwood that has the wallop of a baseball bat.
    If you want it safe/clean (dare I say boring), don't get this. If you want to stand out, be different, be a rebel --
    this one's for you.

    17th May, 2008 (Last Edited: 03rd July, 2008)

    Renato's avatar

    Australia Australia

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    Joop! Homme by Joop!

    Joop Homme EDT has the best longevity of any scent I have ever owned. It has monster sillage which probably leads to a lot of the dislike for this scent - since I frequently smell it all over the place, though plainly it's a going out at night type scent to my nose.

    If one wishes to have a more toned down version of this scent, pour some Joop Homme After Shave splash into an atomiser, and spray it on as you would the EDT. It has less sillage and dramatically less longevity - it only lasts about 15 hours - which is still is on par with many of the EDP strength scents out there. (For the record, Joop Homme After Shave Balm is the longest lasting scented balm I've ever come across).

    I always have the sneaking suspicion that if this scent hadn't come out when it did, but instead came out now from a niche house, many of it's current detractors would be lauding it as fabulously rich and exotic scent akin to the Lutens' ones, or as a longer lasting reinterpretation of Creed's Original Santal.
    Renato

    17th May, 2008

    ubuandibeme's avatar

    United States United States

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    Angel La Part des Anges by Thierry Mugler

    The way I understand this Angel La Part des Anges is an aged re-worked version of Angel in extrait form. I've read that Francoise Caron toiled over this one, and that the aging process for this frag took 25 days. I'm not quite sure exactly what the "aging process" for extrait de parfum consists of, but the result is ever so sweet! And I do mean sweet. My first impression of the latest take on "Angel" is sweet chocolate, almost fruity and a bit 'boozy' in character. Burnt sugar carmel for sure! In comparison to the original extrait, which I tested side by side, the original has a more powdery and ethereal effect. The original also contains that glorious burst of patchouli that I adore! Both are smooth edged, creamy, dreamy delights! Angel is a masterpiece that has eluded me...at least until now...just my luck, I'll have to cough up the big bucks for an extrait version ~ which is the only way I enjoy this treasure! (On the plus side, just a slight dab lasts all day long. So my dollars may actually be well spent!)

    17th May, 2008

    Wordbird's avatar

    Wales Wales

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    Sun by Jil Sander

    And interesting sunshine/summertime fragrance that I initially wrote off as just another tropical Azuree Soleil/Bronze Goddess/Miami Glow 'posh suntan oil' kind of scent. But I was too hasty. This is actually a very well put-together fragrance that has a good progression and a very nice base that lasts well. Yes, it has that kind of 'beach skin accord' and a tropical feel, but it doesn't have the synthetic tones I get from the others. And the base is indeed beautiful and very wearable.
    I may buy a little bottle.

    17th May, 2008

    tnamey's avatar

    United States United States

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    Abercrombie & Fitch Woods by Abercrombie & Fitch

    So sad. Bought my son this fragrance at A&F. I liked it immediately, and after "borrowing his," I bought the scent for my use. It is a wonderfully earthy, woodsy frgrance, that is light, but complex. Always brings comments from women, if lightly used. It does have staying power.

    17th May, 2008

    tnamey's avatar

    United States United States

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    Tommy Bahama for Men by Tommy Bahama

    Tommy Bahama would not have been purchased by me, or even tried. "Tommy BAHHHAMMA!" However, received as a gift, I felt obligated to wear it once. Guess what? One of my favorites- both sophisticated and elegant. The fragrance is no lightweight. It opens a little too warm, but settles down into a tobacco/leather/incense "soul," that lasts. I have received many complements in a short period of time. It is not a replacement for my Knize, Eau Savage, or the several Creed's, but I really like this frag and it will regularly rotate.

    17th May, 2008 (Last Edited: 12th July, 2008)

    mikeperez23's avatar

    United States United States

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    À la Nuit by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    My only experience with smelling jasmine prior to fragrances, was in drinking hot jasmine tea. I became addicted to drinking jasmine tea each and every weekend morning for a while - one particular brand I found of loose leaf tea was smooth yet highly fragrant. I'd open my mouth after a sip to talk, and jasmine notes would magically float all around me.

    My first spray of A la Nuit on my skin triggered the olfactory associations with jasmine tea - but ALN manages to take this flower and plunge it into a poetic, long-lasting and diffusive fragrance that, IMO, has no equal. The sharp, tangy indoles in the flower butch it up on my skin (as long as I don't over apply) and yet still make it a refreshing fragrance. Nothing is better than taking a warm wet washcloth and spritzing one spray of ALN - before rubbing all over ones face and body.

    Try A la Nuit once, and searching for other jasmine scents that are just as good, will be a complete waste of time.

    17th May, 2008

    mikeperez23's avatar

    United States United States

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    Azurée Soleil Eau Fraiche Skinscent by Estée Lauder

    I live in Miami - so smelling like you've been to the beach (coconut suntan lotion, salt water, etc) is easy to smell naturally. Yet, scents like this that are well done, I like.

    Azuree Soleil Eau Fraiche manages to bring the coconut note in an extremely subtle way, folding it into the marine/salt skin accord and smelling just a tad sweet (caramel) in the middle. However my favorite part (hardly mentioned by other wearers) is a kind of coral rock, mineral accord that hovers just above my skin when I wear ASEF. It recalls the smell of the ocean, where it meets a rocky shoreline and the smell those rocks get baking in the sun, wet from ocean water.

    I remember another Basenoter (when I sent him a sample of this) mentioning Tom Ford has bottled the smell of sexy Brazilians. :)

    This is now (May 2008) an officially discontinued fragrance from Estee Lauder - however Lauder (because their contract with Tom Ford fragrances ran out) has re-packaged and re-named ASEF - so you can still buy this scent at Lauder counters under the name, 'Bronze Goddess'. I have tested several times side-by-side and I must say BG is very similar to ASEF.

    17th May, 2008

    scentsitivity's avatar

    United States United States

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    Reaction for Men by Kenneth Cole

    The opening reminds me a lot of Creed’s Millésime Impérial, much more so than Unforgivable. And if it developed similarly past the first 20 minutes, I would be very pleased to own it. However, it declines quickly and ceases to be interesting to me. So I give it a neutral rating, as do the majority of reviewers here. It is unusual for a fragrance on Basenotes to have as many reviews as Reaction for Men, with the most common rating being neutral.

    17th May, 2008

    scentsitivity's avatar

    United States United States

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    Ungaro II by Ungaro

    Per by box, the notes are Bergamot, Orange, Lemon, Mandarin, Neroli, Clove, Thyme, Rosemary, Cinnamon, Geranium, Patchouli, “Sensual Note” [I would infer this to be Civet], Sandalwood and Vanilla. For me, citrus, civet, spice dominate here, with vanilla in the background. Sensual, animalic and different to me – I find it to be interesting. Quite regrettable that this one was discontinued.

    17th May, 2008

    atrac's avatar

    United States United States

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    Sex Appeal for Men by Jovan

    To me, this reminds me a LOT of Old Spice. Old Spice is a classic, smells much better, and is cheaper. This was an unnecessary clone in my opinion.

    Still, they did a good job of copying it, so if for some reason there is no Old Spice available, get this and you'll be satisfied.

    17th May, 2008

    pasha's avatar

    United States United States

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    Narciso Rodriguez for Her by Narciso Rodriguez

    A nicely crafted fragrance, yet it smells very old. Like very old. It is the choice of many young women (a lot of friends of mine use it), yet I haven't met anyone that this frag suits. It is just too safe and smells very tired to my nose. Like insignificant.

    Gorgeous bottle though, true work of minimalist art. I wish the juice had matched the container.

    17th May, 2008

    tonijel's avatar

    Croatia Croatia

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    Narciso Rodriguez for Him by Narciso Rodriguez

    I would agree with Indie guy here . Also strange that no one mentioned pine tree chords that are IMO to obvious and to strong.
    This fragnance somehow reminds me on some hyper producted after shave you could buy in every bigger groceries store and which is little more expensive than other after shaves in there. I think this frag would best fit on some granpa skin , not on someone younger than 40 years(i am 27). I also noticed that Narciso lacks a good drydown transformation, which is defenetly for such strong scent a must.
    When I spreyed it on me , through some time i only notice it smells less intensive, so , no transformation to remember happened. At least not on my skin.
    My stand is thumb down for this, which don't means it is bad scent but definetly not on of my taste.

    P.S.
    thanks to jellybean who took time and few dollars ;) to send me to Croatia test bottle from South Africa !

    17th May, 2008

    Ms Rochambeau's avatar

    United States United States

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    Oud Cuir D'Arabie by Montale

    When first applied this scent smells either like some strange, pungent cheese, or like someone just got off of a spinning ride at Coney Island and vomited. The kicker is that I love this stuff, because after a few patient minutes, those initial notes pass and what emerges is the fine rich leather that this sent is supposed to be about. However, simultaneously you get something like a used ashtray and fresh human sweat note that creates a kind of biker bar atmosphere around you. By now you're probably looking at that "Thumbs up" icon to the right of this review thinking "huh?", but what ties it all together is the warm rose that weaves in and out of the leather the whole time. This scent is NOT for the shy or reserved. Male or female, you have to have a sense of humor to carry this off. It has a real personality that creates a whole performance as you wear it, featuring seedy characters making cameo appearances and all.If I had to campare it to something else, I'd say Dzing! but with black leather arm bands with metal studs and a little less underlying sweetness.

    17th May, 2008

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