Fragrance Reviews from May 2009

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    htch21's avatar
    htch21


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    Original Vetiver by Creed

    Really great smell it does not seem to last one me that long love the smell but kind of low on the amount of time I can smell it on me .I have sinus trouble allergy though so it may just be me but not that way with others I own with the exception of bois de portugal and git the lasting power on creeds is not as long as I would like but they are all great frags!

    15 May, 2009

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    iamthekow


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    Quelques Fleurs Royale by Houbigant

    Not having a lot of experience with florals it's hard to compare it to its peers, but I also noted some similarities to YSL L'Homme at the heart of the fragrance. In a direct comparison QFR makes L'Homme smell like a cheap knockoff (if you don't happen to already think of it that way), possessing a certain depth and quality of ingredients that L'Homme seems to lack.

    On a personal level, Quelques Fleurs Royale opened my eyes to the idea of wearing gender-ambiguous and gender-mismatched fragrances. As others have noted, this is clearly a feminine offering but it works very well on men, too, and for that alone I think it's pretty noteworthy. Wear this with confidence amongst forward-thinking crowds and it will pay off nicely.

    16 May, 2009

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    omniray


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    Kenzo Power by Kenzo

    to me,. is one of the most lovely fragance in years.,.. intimate, deeep, warm, unique, theres something in mistery here, the floral base is beautiful, my new love in fragance.

    16 May, 2009

    ubuandibeme's avatar
    ubuandibeme
    United States United States

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    La Myrrhe by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    Creative? YES! Wearable? Not for everybody! I'd classify this one in the same ranks as Tuberose Criminelle. It opens with powdery aldehydes - which I rather enjoy - but the myrrhe here is definitely medicinal and 'organic' smelling, and ends up camphorous/rubbery. I think Galamb Borong has described it best. I consider La Myrrhe an interesting & artistic scent, but don't personally feel it suits my tastes - I have no desire to wear it.

    16 May, 2009

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    ubuandibeme
    United States United States

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    Nuit de Cellophane by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    A sharp, high pitched fruity-floral featuring osmanthus. It is rounded and softened (over about a 4-6 hour time span) with notes of clean white musk. I enjoy this one on occassion, but do not consider it a "stand out" for Lutens. I'm about 50-50 with it, overall.

    16 May, 2009

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    skinboy8
    Australia Australia

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    Bois du Portugal by Creed

    This is an extraordinarily elegant fragrance that screams "old money" and luxury. And well might it scream luxury, because this stuff ain't cheap. It does, however, last a long time, and it provokes favorable comments from friends and strangers alike. The razor-sharp opening notes settle quite quickly and leave a warm, woody cloud of pure delight.

    To me, this fragrance could be worn by men (or women) of any age - it's grown-up enough for mature gents to wear, but luscious and unique enough for sophisticated younger men to stand out of the crowd in a world filled with average scents. A true delight.

    16 May, 2009

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    odysseusm
    Canada Canada

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    Melograno by Santa Maria Novella

    I agree with those who don't find any pomegranate/grenadine fruit here, also with those who find this to be a soapy scent. The image I get in my mind is a clear, powerfully-scented pink soap. It is a pleasant, clean smell and also quite rich. Not my sort of scent, but interesting.

    16 May, 2009

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    odysseusm
    Canada Canada

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    Tabacco Toscano by Santa Maria Novella

    The full name of this is Tobacco di Toscana. It certainly smells of rich tobacco, a darker sort of tobacco than the blond leaf found in Acqua di Cuba. It is sweet and aromatic, and yet also powdery-dry and airy. I think it has a healthy dollop of coumarin (which often is used to scent pipe tobacco) and also tonka bean, since there is a strong vanilla note. Another rich and powerful scent from SMN, not my sort but quite interesting.

    16 May, 2009

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    odysseusm
    Canada Canada

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    Concorde by Metropolitan Collection

    This is a simple, fairly sweet floral scent. It starts with a green note, and then develops an earthy iris note on a musky base. That's about it.

    16 May, 2009

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    itsthepens
    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Mugler Cologne by Thierry Mugler

    fairly non-descript really, i can see what this is meant to be 'the cologne for people who don't like fragrance'. very clean and soapy (i suspect the 's' ingredient is ACTUAL soap...), there's a very mild vetiver character to it and a bland non-descript citrus aura. a couple of hours in a surprisingly floral heart was in full flight, although still in the vein of clean/fresh/soapiness.

    i'd love this as laundry detergent, but that's about it.

    16 May, 2009

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    itsthepens
    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Envy for Men by Gucci

    by no means a bad fragrance, there's a lot of notes here that i love. unfortunately the execution very quickly becomes jarring - whilst the notes dont clash, they certainly arent in harmony and this is a little tiring on the nose for me to enjoy it.
    the drydown is very pleasant and a lot calmer, but equally it's quite generic and uninspiring.

    16 May, 2009

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    itsthepens
    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Gucci pour Homme by Gucci

    many times this has been compared to Commes des Garcons 2MAN, and i think that's fair.

    To me, this is the slightly classier, less incensey cousin. They have the same arid, smoky, super-cedary shaved-pencils dryness, but the spicy opening here is simpler, all about the pink bay (i have no idea how this differs from ordinary bay, smells like bay to me) and the hot, prickly pepper with warm cinamon and i think possibly a nutmeg or mace note.

    i have been debating for god knows how long whether to get this, as I already have cdg2man. i think i probably will though, i think they are different enough to warrant owning both - IF you really like spiky spices and hot, baked dryness and smoky cedar wood. which i do.

    16 May, 2009

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    itsthepens
    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Original Santal by Creed

    the opening i found surprisingly herbal (the corriander i assume), the light cinamon lending a not unpleasant twist to a fairly mature-feeling top accord. this settled, via some more herbal aromatic-ness (the lavender and rosemary i'm guessing, though neither seemed prominent to me) through a soft fruity middle, i suspected it was apricot but i believe this might be the impression given by the mandarin/orange wood/benzoin accord, the citrus softened and blurred by the baked vanilla note which i am assuming is the benzoin at work. the sandalwood is there to me (although it seems not to others), and it's warm and smooth and very well-blended feeling, with the vanilla character coming through more with time.

    overall, fairly pleasant. not agressively gourmand, it doesn't shout and i think it could easily be worn in an office environment, although it's by equal measure quite casual and relaxed. however i found it a bit on the dull side, and at Creed prices i wouldn't accept dullness.

    16 May, 2009

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    itsthepens
    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Tuscan Leather by Tom Ford

    my first impression was of how accurate the leather note is - i've owned countless leather jackets, and this is the smell of a really good new one left on a car rear window in the sun. warm, soft, and... well, very leathery. there's also a cumin note, not at all funky/stinky/sweat cumin but a rounded, deep, mellow cumin/saffron accord (the saffron is quite quietly done) which complements the leather wonderfully - beautiful, warm supple leatheriness.

    as for the cocaine note, i don't think it's nearly as prominent as others have made out, but after a few minutes there is a slight alkaline fruity saltiness, very much floating above the leather accord rather than blended with it. i actually really like this aspect of it, and indeed the fragrance in general. i suspect that the 'cocaine' note comes from the raspberry note interacting with something elsei can't identify. it's a very linear scent, but the notes are truly fabulous so this really isnt an issue for me. towards the base there's a slightly ambery element, and what to me smells like crushed dried bay leaves.

    It's unabashedly masculine, yet very gentle, and the lasting power is fantastic - i tried it alongside the also great Tobacco Vanille, and it even outlasted that on my skin - pushing 24 hours. Sillage is also very good. I need this in my life.

    16 May, 2009

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    itsthepens
    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Tobacco Vanille by Tom Ford

    as others have said, very linear tobacco and vanilla! but VERY well done. the tobacco note is absolutely divine, and the vanilla is a perfect bedfellow, blending almost seamlessly with it. a dried fruit note is also in the mix, somewhere between cherries and figs and prunes, it has been said that this smells like cherry pipe tobacco and that's very true - but there is no smokiness - this is warm, moist, unsmoked cherry tobacco.

    beautifully recreated notes, masculine yet warm and sweet, enduring (19-20 hours) and great sillage, if you love it on first sniff (like i did) then that's all you need to know.

    16 May, 2009

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    distortech
    United States United States

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    Un Air de Samsara by Guerlain

    Wow! This stuff is amazing. I absolutely love this take on Samsara! Much more "user friendly" for casual wear and a great alternative to the original.

    IMHO, GREAT FOR GUYS TOO!

    16 May, 2009

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    michailG


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    Osmanthus by Ormonde Jayne

    For the most of it I agree with Vibert.
    There is certainly an old fashioned quality in this. It starts very fruity on my skin, soon after it turns a bit more acid (a hint of citrus). Then it settles in what is staying for quite a few hours a white fruity/floral, pleasant scent. It is rather too sweet for my taste. After a few minutes the leathery notes are revealed that make the scent somehow pleasant on my skin, but in an indefinable way. And indeed it does stay on my skin long after I apply it. Finally on me it has a soothing effect but I also don’t think of it as a scent to wear at work or a night out… unless I want to challenge some noses. I will start mixing it though with a more citrusy perfume and see the results. All and all it is an interesting perfume and it is worth trying.

    16 May, 2009

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    jathanas
    Australia Australia

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    Mûre et Musc Extrême by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    Berries and clean musc. Who would have thought?

    L'Artisan have created in Mure et Musc Extreme a fragrance that offers the most natural fruity accords. Truly unique in that the berries here aren't sweet or gourmand; instead they are zesty and crisp.

    Ideal for daytime occasions,or the office. Longevity is about 4 hours which is OK as I like to wear something else in the afternoon.

    16 May, 2009

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    SirSlarty
    United States United States

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    Imperial Jade Emperor by Agatha Brown

    I spent as much time as I could with this trying to figure out if I like it or not. I do not. It's too creamy and sweet for me. It's oddly like Le Male's sweet vanilla and lavender accords minus the essential vanilla that holds Le Male together. Plus there's a lot more floral stuff going on in this which also reminds me of Fleur du Male's creamy florals. The black currant berry-esque note really sticks out and ruins the fragrance for me for an otherwise nice blend of woods and musks.

    16 May, 2009

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    SirSlarty
    United States United States

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    Polo Modern Reserve by Ralph Lauren

    Very nice. It's neat that the original perfumer was tapped to make a modern take on his old formula. Part of me thinks that this is the new formula and will phase out the Polo Classic. Very clever by Polo if that's the case because it smells very similar but definitely like a reformulation. As for Polo Crest clone... Modern Reserve seems more green and oakmossy than anything. Fresh aromatic leather and pine is what this is. After sampliong a few times I have decided that Modern Reserve is an awesome scent.

    16 May, 2009

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    SirSlarty
    United States United States

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    Kolnisch Juchten by Parfums Regence

    Thick and rich dark, animalic, sticky leather, tar, patchouli and incense notes. This stuff is so butch it makes Robin William's chest hair look like Patrick Stewart's head. The list of ingredients would suggest that this would be overpowering but it's rather average in that aspect but average is a good thing when considering something so dark. Mazzolari Lui too much for you but need something equally as masculine? Try this supposed 300 year old formula.

    16 May, 2009

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    Asha
    United States United States

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    Le Feu D'Issey by Issey Miyake

    Issey Miyake Le Feu d'Issey and Etro Etra Side-by-Side Comparison

    Le Feu d'Issey Notes: Bergamot, Coconut, Rosewood, Anise, Jasmine, Rose, Milk, Caramel, Cedar, Sandal, Vanilla, Musk (from Osmoz)

    Etra Notes: Rosewood, Coriander, Cardamom, Geranium, Sandalwood (from apothica.com)

    I read in The Guide (Turin and Sanchez) that Etro was like a "less good" Feu d'Issey. Considering Fd'I is discontinued, I decided to test them together. Looking at the published notes, there is indeed some overlap, and the expectation is that the fragrance will be woody-spicy.

    Upon applying Fd'I, it really took me back to the time when I owned it--it is a strange fragrance, unlike most others I have tried. It is simultaneously fresh and dirty, almost as if the perfumer was trying to represent an alternative to carnation. Fd'I has the same cool and moist qualities of carnation with a spiciness which is almost to the point of being sinister. The spices are peppery and woody, with a dirt-like quality which reminds me of cardamom. The spices ground the fragrance while the crisp, watery floral notes float above the base. The overall effect is almost electric--it is fuzzy and diaphanous, making it difficult to pin down exactly where the scent comes from. In the later development, Fd'I becomes a little more ambery sweet, and the bitter, dry spices keep it in check while cedar wood carries the fragrance to the drydown.

    Etra smelled quite similar to Fd'I upon first application. The fragrance initially has the same cool-hot combination of florals and spices, but somehow seems more clean. It is a touch sweeter than Fd'I in the top notes, and the mid notes that poke through are substantially greener and more herbal. Etra goes through a low-sillage stage in the mid notes, becoming a skin scent of cedar, vanilla, pepper and cardamom. I had to apply more to get additional projection. I thought the two fragrances would have similar drydowns as they both seemed to be headed toward cedar-musk-vanilla. On the whole, the Feu d'Issey drydown is more complex and unique with peppery spices surviving well into the woody vanilla stage. Etra seems light but satisfying with vanilla, woods and a dash of anise which makes it a dead ringer for the drydown of Serge Lutens Douce Amere.

    I can't say I disagree with T&S about Feu d'Issey being the better of the two. However, I think if anybody is expecting is Fd'I from Etra, it will only be in the first half of the development. Since I really like Douce Amere, I can't say I would be averse to wearing Etra at all, as I get two great fragrances in one bottle! Etra really does lack the sparkle and balance of composition that Fd'I has, though. Sampling Fd'I today, I remember why I bought it in the first place--it is a carnation-like composition centered on an alternative oriental base. Where have we heard this theme before? From two of my most treasured favorites: Chanel Coco has rosy, spicy carnation over a traditional amber oriental base; and Shiseido Feminite du Bois has violet and fruit over a woody, balsamic alternative oriental base. Lest anybody lament the demise of Feu d'Issey, its legacy continues in fragrances such as Bulgari Black, Kenzo Amour and SL Douce Amere. And of course, Etro Etra.

    16 May, 2009

    Asha's avatar
    Asha
    United States United States

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    Etra by Etro

    Issey Miyake Le Feu d'Issey and Etro Etra Side-by-Side Comparison

    Le Feu d'Issey Notes: Bergamot, Coconut, Rosewood, Anise, Jasmine, Rose, Milk, Caramel, Cedar, Sandal, Vanilla, Musk (from Osmoz)

    Etra Notes: Rosewood, Coriander, Cardamom, Geranium, Sandalwood (from apothica.com)

    I read in The Guide (Turin and Sanchez) that Etro was like a "less good" Feu d'Issey. Considering Fd'I is discontinued, I decided to test them together. Looking at the published notes, there is indeed some overlap, and the expectation is that the fragrance will be woody-spicy.

    Upon applying Fd'I, it really took me back to the time when I owned it--it is a strange fragrance, unlike most others I have tried. It is simultaneously fresh and dirty, almost as if the perfumer was trying to represent an alternative to carnation. Fd'I has the same cool and moist qualities of carnation with a spiciness which is almost to the point of being sinister. The spices are peppery and woody, with a dirt-like quality which reminds me of cardamom. The spices ground the fragrance while the crisp, watery floral notes float above the base. The overall effect is almost electric--it is fuzzy and diaphanous, making it difficult to pin down exactly where the scent comes from. In the later development, Fd'I becomes a little more ambery sweet, and the bitter, dry spices keep it in check while cedar wood carries the fragrance to the drydown.

    Etra smelled quite similar to Fd'I upon first application. The fragrance initially has the same cool-hot combination of florals and spices, but somehow seems more clean. It is a touch sweeter than Fd'I in the top notes, and the mid notes that poke through are substantially greener and more herbal. Etra goes through a low-sillage stage in the mid notes, becoming a skin scent of cedar, vanilla, pepper and cardamom. I had to apply more to get additional projection. I thought the two fragrances would have similar drydowns as they both seemed to be headed toward cedar-musk-vanilla. On the whole, the Feu d'Issey drydown is more complex and unique with peppery spices surviving well into the woody vanilla stage. Etra seems light but satisfying with vanilla, woods and a dash of anise which makes it a dead ringer for the drydown of Serge Lutens Douce Amere.

    I can't say I disagree with T&S about Feu d'Issey being the better of the two. However, I think if anybody is expecting is Fd'I from Etra, it will only be in the first half of the development. Since I really like Douce Amere, I can't say I would be averse to wearing Etra at all, as I get two great fragrances in one bottle! Etra really does lack the sparkle and balance of composition that Fd'I has, though. Sampling Fd'I today, I remember why I bought it in the first place--it is a carnation-like composition centered on an alternative oriental base. Where have we heard this theme before? From two of my most treasured favorites: Chanel Coco has rosy, spicy carnation over a traditional amber oriental base; and Shiseido Feminite du Bois has violet and fruit over a woody, balsamic alternative oriental base. Lest anybody lament the demise of Feu d'Issey, its legacy continues in fragrances such as Bulgari Black, Kenzo Amour and SL Douce Amere. And of course, Etro Etra.

    16 May, 2009

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    Bigsly
    United States United States

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    David Beckham Instinct by Beckham

    Perhaps a bit more refined that Lomani (the original one) but not worth the extra money (I've seen 100 ml bottles of Lomani for $7). Rather than this (or Lomani), I prefer the original Tommy Hilfiger or Azzaro's Silver/Black (also called Onyx), if I want a simple but pleasant slightly spicy fragrance. The Azzaro is a bit more complex. I guess Instinct is for the guy who thinks he knows what a "cologne" is supposed to smell like. I won't speak to the longevity because I can't wear it too long, but the sillage seemed moderate to good. I'll give it a neutral because it's not "bad," just of no interest to the aficionado.

    16 May, 2009

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    Somerville Metro Man
    United States United States

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    Vétyver Haiti by Comptoir Sud Pacifique

    Comptoir Sud Pacifique Vetyver Haiti

    Vetiver may be the most malleable and used note in all of perfumery. Although bergamot would have a case to make, you rarely find bergamot as the centerpiece of many scents. The many takes on vetiver and the ability for perfumers to find new ways to use it without them all feeling the same makes vetiver-centric scents an ever interesting field to explore. Comptoir Sud Pacifique is really more known for its line of Vanilla centered scents and in 1977 Vetyver Haiti was their attempt to marry their vanilla sensibility to vetiver. At the top lemon and bergamot start with a light citrusy feel. I think I would've preferred a sharper more bitter citrus instead of the bright citrus because the bright citrus there, is quickly overwhelmed by a combination of vetiver and carnation. This mix of the green of vetiver and the spicy clove character of carnation make for a spicy heart. The vetiver stays firmly in place but the spiciness of the clove fades away and the vanilla that Comptoir Sud Pacifique is known for comes in. I was expecting a bracing blast of sweet vanilla as that is the hallmark of the rest of the line. Instead this is a lightly applied vanilla and it comes as a perfect light and sweet contrast to the clove in the heart. This mix of vetiver and vanilla stays finely balanced on my skin for many hours and is a lovely companion for the time it is there. Once again I am happy to find that in a different pair of hands a new aspect of vetiver can be discovered.

    16 May, 2009

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    Somerville Metro Man
    United States United States

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    Piper Nigrum by Lorenzo Villoresi

    Lorenzo Villoresi Piper Nigrum

    There are scents that come along and make a big splash. Usually it is because they have something new to offer. In 1999 Lorenzo Villoresi released Piper Nigrum and this scent still has something new to offer ten years on. Piper Nigrum is the botanical name for black pepper and this is what makes Piper Nigrum different. There are many scents out there that use pepper to effect to add a bit of slap and tickle to the olfactory development. Piper Nigrum puts the pepper front and center and leves it in place for the whole development. M. Villoresi chose some other herbs to join the pepper at the top namely anise, and mint. The pepper is what you smell when you are walking through the spice section and you get to the shelf holding the ground pepper. There is an arid airy quality to the piquancy of the pepper. Add to this the tang of anise and the zip of mint and the beginning of this comes off as a trip to the spice market. The mint pulls away first followed by the anise to be replaced by woods namely the cleanliness of cedar and the creaminess of sandalwood. This along with the pepper makes for a different take on the pepper as it brings out more of its resinous, almost incense-like, qualities and it tones down the spiciness of it all. This development of the pepper continues into a classic contrast of sweet and spicy as a sweet amber pairs with the central note in the base. This juxtaposition really brings out the resinous quality of the pepper to its fullest extent. I can see why Piper Nigrum was so popular when it first hit the scene. What I don't understand is why it still isn't talked about as it has a singular quality I haven't found in any other scent I've worn to date.

    16 May, 2009

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    Somerville Metro Man
    United States United States

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    Armani Privé Ambre Soie by Giorgio Armani

    Armani Prive Ambre Soie

    I have slowly but surely worked my way through all of the Armani Prive scents. I admire the intent to make high quality, read niche, scents under the Armani banner. On me for the most part they have been successful as I have enjoyed most of them. I have found all of them to be close wearing, long-lasting and well-constructed scents. Ambre Soie was the fourth of the Prives, created by Christine Nagel, in 2004. It definitely shares all of the genetics of its labelmates. At the top a stiff burst of ginger, clove and cinnamon start this with a spicy jolt. From there the amber begins to come in and of the three spices that start the scent only the cinnamon remains to combine really nicely with the amber. This is a sweet amber and in conjunction with the cinnamon it comes across as not too sweet and not as gourmand-like as some other ambers like Hermes Hermessence Ambre Narguile. As this moves into the base I get a nice bracing shot of cedar to add some clean lines to the amber and to finish things in a rousing style. Like all of the Prives there are better examples out there of the central note and style of these scents. Ambre Soie will not be my number one amber scent but it very likely will make my top 10.

    16 May, 2009

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    Somerville Metro Man
    United States United States

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    Paestum Rose by Eau d'Italie

    Eau d'Italie Paestum Rose

    Paestum was a city in the Roman Empire which was renowned for the roses which only bloomed twice a year. Bertrand Duchaufour is a perfumer who is in the midst of creating his own empire of renowned scents. Eau d'Italie is a line created by M. Duchaufour for the Positano, Italy hotel La Sireneuse and Paestum Rose was the second scent he created for Eau d'Italie in 2006. One of the things I look most forward to in a Duchaufour creation is the twist he will add to something I think I know well. Rose is certainly a note most colognoisseurs know well and M. Duchaufour finds a way to make it seem new to my nose in Paestum Rose. The top contains none of the rose, as a mix of pepper, cinnamon and currant start things off with a spicy tang. From here the rose comes in and it comes in on cat's feet slowly and quietly. All of a sudden the spices seemed to evaporate, like a morning fog, and the rose is left there. There is a hint of osmanthus to help add a little depth to the very transparent rose but this just flows lightly and lushly over my skin. Into the base, incense comes out followed by the unique feel of wenge and a light amber. If I told you a base was composed of incense, wenge, and amber you would probably be expecting the nasal equivalent of a downpour. What is amazing about Paestum Rose is all of the components of the base plus the rose are given space to breathe together and combine, to instead create the nasal equivalent of a spring shower that refreshes instead of drenches. Bertrand Duchaufour is one of the best and most consistent perfumers working today and Paestum Rose is an example of his talent in full flower.

    16 May, 2009

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    Somerville Metro Man
    United States United States

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    Maharadjah by Parfums de Nicolaï

    Parfums de Nicolai Maharadjah

    Patricia de Nicolai has shown that her Guerlain bloodline runs true and as the grand-daughter of Pierre Guerlain will always have that mentioned. More's the pity because I think she has now achieved a status where she is creating more new and noteworthy scents than the House which she shares her genetics with. 2006's Maharadjah is a good example of a de Nicolai creation. When you hear Maharadjah you think of India and you probably expect some cumin somewhere in the mix. Then you spray on Maharadjah and you are greeted with a strong opening but instead of spices what you get is lavender. Actually I should restate that, you get Lavender with a capital L. I'm one who likes his lavender but this is an industrial strength blast of lavender. I like it but I can see it being too much for some. The lavender sticks around for a good long time before the expected spices start to appear in the heart. This does have spices that begin with "c" but not cumin and not with a capital "c". The spices here are clove and cinnamon. They very slowly come forward and eventually push the lavender to the background. Once the spice firmly takes the wheel this scent does turn the corner into the expected spicy oriental territory a name like Maharadjah would lead you to expect. The cinnamon comes off very warm on my skin and pretty long-lasting. The spices stick around as sandalwood and patchouli close the scent out with a creamy conclusion. Maharadjah is not a scent for everyone and I imagine the strong lavender at the beginning will be a turn-off for many but it is this level of the unexpected that makes Maharadjah such a fascinating scent for me.

    16 May, 2009

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    Somerville Metro Man
    United States United States

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    Colère d'Épices by Esteban

    Esteban Colere D'Epices

    It is always a joy to discover a new House and in this first effort that I've tried from the Parisian niche House, Esteban its even better when the scent is good, too. Esteban's stated purpose is to marry Mediterranean and Japanese aesthetics in their perfumes. The 2007 release Colere D'Epices is translated as the "Wrath of Spices" and is part of the Collection Couleurs. This is another case of the name having little to do with what it smells like on my skin. The spice part is accurate but I feel anything but wrathful over this scent. Cardamom and ginger start things off and this is a beautifully subtle start. Cardamom adds a hint of lemon and in conjunction with the richness of the ginger makes the top spicy and breezy. The transition into the heart begins with the appearance of a clove note which then moves into a light floral dominated by heliotrope. It is here in the heart that the stated Japanese aesthetic is most prevalent. The floral nature is kept at arm's length and it never moves into a full frontal floral. The heliotrope is an equal partner with the clove. The base is also a finely balanced mix of amber and musk. The musk comes off as a sheer white musk mixed with a strong, not sweet, amber. To my nose Colere D'Epices definitely succeeds at making a scent which has Mediterranean influence but done in the way of a zen garden where as you focus on each individual component it is nice but taken as a whole it transcends its ingredients. I am now very curious to try more from Esteban.

    16 May, 2009

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