Fragrance Reviews from August 2009

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    Hiroshima Mon Amour's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Tolu by Ormonde Jayne

    Starts strong and sweet with a blast of orange blossom, wonderfully tempered by shadowy juniper. Within seconds a lightly spiced and deep amber dimension opens up, leading you into the already noted resinous 'warmth' at the heart of the fragrance. As the scent progresses waves of vanilla, amber and the merest whiff of delightful rose weave in and out of the aroma, all accompanied by subtly blended spicing.

    There certainly is a very luxurious sense about this fragrance, and I agree it seems perfect for autumn days. Lasting power is good - it eventually peters out into a delicate puff of powdery amber.

    06 August, 2009

    bpavilla's avatar

    United States United States

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    Boss Number One by Hugo Boss

    I purchased this cologne without testing it. This smell is completely unoffensive, but seems more tailored for an older generation. When I wear it at work older people will compliment me but I have never received a compliment from someone my age. The sandalwood and patchouli balance nicely, good scent just not for me.

    06 August, 2009

    bpavilla's avatar

    United States United States

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    Nautica Classic by Nautica

    Smells unisex, mostly because it just smells like window cleaner to me.

    06 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Chaps (original) by Ralph Lauren

    In all these years I never felt an impulse to test Chaps: My heroes have never been cowboys and I guess I thought this had nothing to offer for me… I finally took the plunge and I don’t mind saying that I was amazed at the first sniff. Granted, it’s old-fashioned, uber-masculine, cowboy iconic, and potent; but in my mind, there’s no doubt that it is a very good fragrance for its drugstore status – it's smooth, blended, and comfortingly endearing. It isn’t complex: It doesn’t seem to have movements among levels of the scent pyramid. Its intricately massed combination stays solidly what it is, and that is an invitingly smooth and enjoyable masculine scent. I can’t really separate out the individual notes in the fragrance: It’s not constructed for that and its ingredients are likely not expensive enough to stand close analysis – but that doesn’t stop Chaps from being a satisfying scent. I don’t get sweet, and yet I don’t get dry. I don’t get more than a modicum of powder, and I don’t get “leather,” but it does seem leather-like so I can understand why other reviewers claim leather, but what I get is a well integrated floral / patchouli / mossy / ambery combination with just a touch of sweet – probably a honey-like note. I don’t apply it on cloth or any exposed skin… it’s too strong with that kind of application. I apply it on my chest and that method also increases its rather poor longevity. Chaps is a good scent for the money. I know, I know... I don't wear it very often... but I can say that about several niche and expensive designer fragrances that I own...



    06 August, 2009 (Last Edited: 28 May, 2011)

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Jubilation XXV by Amouage

    This is one of THOSE scents: the kind that I often get stuck with because it seems so impressive at first sniff. It is so impressive – unique, rich, refined – resinous woods and incenses that cause pain because they were so beautiful – I lusted for it, and I almost dumped $290 at that first sniff. Fully ensconced in that mindset, instead of buying immediately I decide to write a review describing its greatness. I wished to show the world how excellent Amouage Jubilation XXV is. And that desire was its undoing… you see, to write a review I have to put aside my mindset and begin using my actual brain.

    At my second wearing I noticed the fruit / signature note and felt the first tinge of disappointment – I react to it the same way I react to the house note of Ormande Jayne: I don’t dislike it but it just doesn’t push any buttons for me and it eventually weighs the fragrance down. My third wearing I noticed the signature fruit note and noticed the signature fruit note, and continued and continued to notice the signature fruit note. Why, I wondered, am I noticing this signature note when what I really want is to notice the frankincense, labdanum, and gaicwood notes all those resinous treasures supposedly inhabiting the fragrance? The answer, of course, is – those luxurious, resinous diamonds and sapphires fade quickly while the signature fruit notes rise to prominence, and the fruitiness is hell-bent to dominate the total olfactory real estate regardless of my desire for those richer, rarer, soul fulfilling resinous jewels... And I am probably oversensitive to the fruit notes. I tried applying a heavy dose of liquid, but the fragrance became softer and lost sillage while creating an oil slick on my skin.

    …I’ve never noticed the drydown (if there is one) because after six or seven testings of two or three hours of smelling a not-very-interesting-dried-fruit note, I’ve lost interest. Thank you, Amouage, for making yet another one-third-of-a-thousand-dollar fragrance that I have little interest in buying…

    All that said, Jubilation XXV is a top quality fragrance in all ways – it is the only Amouage I tested (so far) that I would consider buying not counting the discontinued Amouage Silver Crystal for Men. Jubilation XXV is built of undoubtedly high quality ingredients. The artistry of the blendings is more than superior. XXV is highly wearable and I find it much more adaptable than previous Amouages: Jubilation XXV will work with jeans or tuxedos or anything in between. The quality is there... but for me the passion isn't, and at this price I need to re-experience that passion I felt on the first testing. (Edit of 6 August 2009 review.)

    06 August, 2009 (Last Edited: 04 January, 2014)

    Carabruva's avatar

    United States United States

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    Incanto pour Homme Essential by Salvatore Ferragamo

    Hmm...after the drydown it vaguely reminds me a bit of my L'Eau par Kenzo (probably the yuzu), although it's a different and more inferior scent for sure. DULLAH nailed it on the "Windex" note. I think I'm pretty indifferent about this one. It's too synthetic, though not enough to offend my senses. But there's absolutely nothing that would make me buy it.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Spring Flower by Creed


    My first few sniffs of this had me saying “Oh, yawn, another fruity – floral – the last thing in the world I need to be smelling now…” So I lost interest until about ten minutes later when I realized that the textured, generic, slightly synthetic fruity – floral opening I had just experienced had turned into an aroma of delicacy and freshness. It’s not even fair to call the opening “fruity – floral” because the floral part of it is minimal. The fruit, however, are etherealized translucence. The peach, pear, and melon (I don’t get apricot or apple) are pristinely vaporous, and, while fruity fragrances are usually an annoyance to me, I can’t help but admire the clarity and quality of these accords. The heart notes pick up some floral elements – lily of the valley and water lily each with an edge of lemon blossom. It’s a very good floral accord – bright and clean… feminine but not girly. For the base I get cedar, vanilla, and powder.

    Spring Flower performs beautifully on the skin… Its sillage occurs in wisps – I would say that this is a scent that should be smelled as sillage rather than close to the skin. Close to the skin Spring Flower smells more creamy. The wispy nature of its sillage is its true accomplishment and persona, IMHO.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Matsukita by Crown Perfumery


    Jasmine and green, subtly presented in a texture olfaction… the kind of texture some people refer to a cardboard, or hairspray, or (my favorite) Snuggles: This is the entire basis and the content of Crown’s Matsukita. It’s a clean, subtle, non-flowery floral fragrance. Most of the time I smell it as a clean, jasmine / floral. A few times, I have gotten Snuggles. When it’s the floral, it’s elegant and feminine. When it’s Snuggles, its very forgettable and unisex. A chancy fragrance IMO…

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Halston by Halston


    I think something has been changed in this scent. A girlfriend in the seventies wore this and it was wonderful… so totally chypre and sexy. Now I get that chypre feeling only for the first few minutes after application. Then it switches to a floral that I would swear has violet dominating, even though violet is not listed in the official pyramid. That ?violet? ruins it for me: I lose contact with the other florals, the woods, and the entire chypre feeling to the fragrance. I don’t remember the Halston of the ‘70s being like this one.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Yvresse / Champagne by Yves Saint Laurent


    There is a sparkly and bubbly feeling to the opening, reminiscent of champagne. The opening is very peachy and I can smell the cumin along with the peach / apricot: The cumin improves the accord because I usually don’t care much for peach notes. It doesn’t get floral enough for me in the middle – it keeps its peachy / fruity character pretty much all the way through. I do smell a nice layer of jasmine in the background. All the way through the opening and mid notes I get a disagreeable green-like note in the far background that seems an awful lot like violet to me, although violet is not listed in the pyramids. In the drydown the cedar and a lesser vanilla and patchouli takes prominence with a background that has an element of castoreum: Very nice but not thrilling.

    Yvresse is a softer fragrance than many YSL’s, and, although it has an enjoyable – fun even – character, it also shows distinct aspects of sophistication. Its bubbly character in the opening is excellent enough to make me enjoy it even though it features peach, but to me the rest of the fragrance is not very interesting. Very good longevity earns it a somewhat tenuous thumb's up.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Boss Number One by Hugo Boss


    The number one Boss fragrance not only in name: I was expecting something completely different. I wasn’t expecting anything of substance and sensuality. This is not one of those later characterless and artificial Hugo Boss fragrances. This fragrance exhibits genuine ‘80s characteristics – probably diluted through reformulations – but still retaining definite aspects of powerhouse potency and sensuality. Boss Number One opens alcoholy, and immediately moves into a rich juniper and artemisia –and it has a slightly dirty nature, but where the dirty comes from is not hinted at in the pyramid, unless its related to the patchouli of the base. I get very little citrus or herbal in the opening – just those lush, masculine notes. The middle notes get a little more arid in spite of the honey that’s listed for the middle. The drydown is quietly reserved with deep wood, tobacco, and patchouli notes.

    The unfortunate aspect of the fragrance is its lack of longevity. Usually scents like this last much longer than Boss Number One.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Devils Food by Demeter Fragrance Library


    Not only chocolate but also coffee in this fragrance: It’s a complete olfactory snack. The chocolate is a fairly good one – it’s very sweet, and the first aspect of chocolate enters as a sharp dark chocolate but very soon becomes more of a sweet powdered cocoa scent. The coffee is present all through the short life of the fragrance. Devil’s Food is pleasant fragrance. If you think you'ld like chocolate and coffee, try it.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Grass by Demeter Fragrance Library


    When I think of grass I think of the smell that comes from mowing the lawn with a non-gas-powered lawn mower. Demeter’s Grass doesn’t smell like fresh cut grass with or without the gas smells. This is meant to smell like “the freshness and sweetness of a lush green grass pasture, much like the pasture…” As such, it has a strong element of wild flowers and odoriferous weeds, which basically challenges my remembrance of mowing Mrs. Molly Mortisen’s half-acre lawn with a push lawn mower and getting a whole eighty-five cents for it. This is an “ehhh…” scent that should have been named “Meadow.”

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Lagerfeld Man by Lagerfeld


    I don’t remember the last time I smelled a starched shirt… but I’m pretty sure that’s not what I’m getting here. I mainly get an unusual cedar that seems quite peppery. Lagerfeld Man opens with a bit of citrus and a tiny bit of lavender, but mostly what I smell is that peppery cedar note that begins as quite a pleasant sensation, but all too quickly mutates to a synthetic skin scent as it ages. As a linear cedar / pepper scent, Lagerfeld Man is quite likeable, and I enjoy it’s masculinity because I find it refreshingly different from the typical designer production of synthetic, generic, unisex fragrances of the past fifteen / twenty years. But there are a few quite recent masculine offerings that are better, more interesting and more complex than this one. The most unfortunate element of this fragrance, though, is its longevity – it doesn’t last near long enough.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Polo Crest by Ralph Lauren


    Similar to Polo Green, but different enough to claim its own character and feeling. It mostly retains Polo Green’s rawness and masculinity, but it is toned down and smoothed out some. It opens with an herbal / spicy green note with a sharp, light aromatic tinge that I like very much. I especially enjoy the caraway element in opening – it adds an additional spicy / aromatic element to a basic Polo Green opening broadening the opening to a cooler aromatic accord. The opening doesn’t seem as aggressive as Polo Green’s – it’s more herbal and less resinous. I prefer Polo Crest’s way of introduction – less explosive, broader, and more refined. The difference between the middle notes of the two Polo’s is subtle but important. I think that the florals take over a bit more in Crest than in Green. I wouldn’t call Crest’s middle strongly floral but it is smoother and less herbal. The base is where the real difference lies. In Crest, the leather is greatly reduced, and the incense and woods come through more strongly. Like the original Polo Green, Polo Crest’s accords are masculine, distinctive, and long lasting. The “sweet” in both fragrances lies in a continuum somewhere between minimal and nonexistent. Because of having similar coniferous notes – juniper, pine, and cedar – in each level of the pyramid, I find both fragrances somewhat linear, but still, I see Polo Crest as having less intense coniferous notes than Polo Green. I do prefer the drydown of Crest. Of course, the sillage and longevity of both are excellent, and both are thumb’s up fragrances.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Givenchy pour Homme Blue Label by Givenchy


    I dislike criticizing fragrances too much or too often – I don’t like to think of myself as a complainer – I’d rather exert my ability to tolerate things. I also dislike the lack of creativity in me where I end up saying the same thing over and over again, but here it goes again: Givenchy Pour Homme Blue Label is vacuous, synthetic, uninspired, and copied from something better. I wonder why Givenchy felt that the world needed yet another lower-end, pretend-high-fashion, market-inspired, too expensive, imitatively conceived, cheaply made, ugly bottled rip-off of something better. Acqua di Gio, Bulgari Acqua, the Issey Miyaki and Kenzo offerings are much better than this one. In its defense I will say that this is much better than the red Givenchy Pour Homme.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Everlast Original 1910 by Everlast


    A very good little scent here. It starts out with a citrus / lavender / mint accord that is light, refreshing, and clean; the opening lasts a decent amount of time before it moves into the spicy middle notes of cypress, cinnamon, and nutmeg. For some reason it doesn’t come across as strong on my skin, but I enjoy the fact that I don’t have to be careful in applying it. The middle, though spicy, is rather soft and reserved. The base continues the reticence of the fragrance with a somewhat dry leather, patchouli, and musk accord. All of the levels show a definite presence and substance even though the fragrance is light and rather discreet.

    Everlast Original 1910 is an enjoyable, relaxed, if not hugely original scent. It is nicely put together and it has very competent moves, ok sillage, excellent longevity… it’s modern, well made, and it smells good.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Femme Individuelle by Montblanc


    This is the caramelized version of vanilla. This is the version I like. The vanilla in Mont Blanc’s Femme Individuelle shows itself immediately with it rich, sweet tones. To my nose the vanilla dominates but the current and rose notes show themselves quite clearly in the background. There’s a soft, musky, vanilla drydown. Femme Individuelle seems to be linear, it has very good lasting power, decent sillage, and is beautifully feminine.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Stetson Black by Stetson


    I enjoy the classic Stetson, so I was looking forward to this one. Stetson Black is disappointing. It opens with an overused, basil heavy accord. I can’t understand why the makers would use such an uninspired opening accord. The middle is not much of an improvement because it uses a rather inferior version of cedar and vetiver. The middle’s “liquid suede”?… I don’t know what the liquid aspect is… I don’t think I smell it unless it is that slightly annoying note in the background that I’ve smelled since the opening. Stetson Black never gets any better for me… Its drydown comes across as mediocre at best. Okay, it’s not a terrible fragrance and my objections are the same personal prejudices that I have against most leather scents, so, trying to be fair, I’m going with a neutral. Solid sillage, poor longevity…


    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Sandflowers by Montale


    Sandflowers is a very light aquatic / supposedly woody fragrance that opens with quite a pleasant aquatic note and then dissolves into nearly nothing. I was expecting the calone and I was expecting the sandalwood: The aquatic calone came through quite well, and a very nice note it is. I didn’t get any sandalwood, although there was a pleasant oakmoss background to the miscellaneous texture of the fragrance. Like so many of the Montale non-aouds, Sandflowers comes across as vague but pleasant. It is too nebulous, indistinct, and recessive for me. I guess this, as many of the other non-aouds, was not designed for me…

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Feuilles Vertes by Creed


    An unabashedly prejudiced review: The superb quality of the individual notes and the complexity of construction separate this fragrance from most of its competition – including most of the Creeds. Feuille Verte is an incredible offering. The clarity, purity, and artistry of the notes and accords have little competition. In the opening I especially appreciate the lime note that is as pristine as the lime notes of the best colognes: quite an achievement in a fragrance as complex as this. The rose combined with oakmoss in the middle notes is a unique and interesting combination to my nose, even though those two notes are not particular favorites of mine. The base is what I admire most.: I’m a sucker for jasmine and this is another jasmine version that I love unconditionally. I found the presentation of the jasmine a surprise when the movement of the fragrance led me there. It’s perfection. Let me echo the sentiment that the only thing wrong with this fragrance is that it is not part of Creed’s permanent line.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Organza First Light by Givenchy


    I do see a distant relationship to Organza – they have somewhat the same background texture, but there is a big difference in strength. This one is very subtle: It takes a lot of concentration to even smell it. It opens with a light floral / citrus. I can’t place the particular floral… the honeysuckle / lily of the valley mentioned in the pyramid sounds about correct. Then in the middle it switches to an extremely light white floral – I get primarily jasmine with a shadowing of vanilla. The drydown is mostly vanilla. I don’t get any of the wood mentioned in the pyramid.

    First Light is soft and light to the point of disappearing. I do (barely) smell the entire fragrance and its movement and it is a pleasant sheer floral but I really don’t determine any sillage, just a skin scent, and not a very remarkable one at that. Weak, nice but bland, short-lived: that about sums it up.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Wild Spice for Men by Coty


    Worn to be wild! – That’s what the box says, and who can argue with that? Wild spice for Men is an uncomplicated and pleasant spicy fragrance. The box says it’s a “…mixture of bold clove, nutmeg, and thyme,” and I can agree with that. This fragrance is quite spicy and if you like spice, you will probably like this. It’s a well-balanced accord that contrary to its name, the rampant spice lover would not find “wild.” It isn’t overpowering and I don’t discern anything either edgy or disagreeable in it. It is a genuine cologne so it has a somewhat limited longevity, which can be a good thing because it offers something different from the usual citrus colognes for the person who wants a short lived fragrance for whatever reason. I like it, but I can see why it was quickly discontinued: The modern buyer would probably be expecting something modernly generic and synthetic and this doesn’t fit that model. Thumbs up!

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    English Leather Black by Dana


    English Leather Black does smell cheap at the first sniff, but it quickly starts developing into something better: the bergamot of the top and middle’s coriander combine to form a unique accord: It’s a rich-ish texture accord incorporating some of the warmer notes – lavender and possibly cardamom (I would say). The opening quickly moves to the middle accord which reminds me a bit of fragrances like DK Leaded and Unleaded or Cacharel’s Nemo. I find the middle level very enjoyable but it doesn’t have a very solid sillage, nor does it last anywhere near long enough. The base is satisfactorily woody – I don’t get any sweet from the fragrance and the musk of the base doesn’t come across very clearly, but I enjoy the drydown except that it just doesn’t last long enough.

    English Leather Black is an interesting and somewhat successful attempt at a black version of the drugstore classic. It would have been successful had it any real longevity.


    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Salt Air by Demeter Fragrance Library


    A nice fragrance: It smells pretty much salty, and I get a short-lived ocean experience from it, but mainly I get salt. I really enjoy it as a room spray, but it makes a very nice personal fragrance for the times I don't want anything obtrusive.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Pi Neo by Givenchy


    I can see only a dubious relationship between ∏ Neo and the original ∏: the relationship is quite tenuous… there is a vague vanilla note in Neo’s background, but the main delivery of this flanker is a completely different story from its progenitor. Neo is a fresh, light, synthetic, sweet, (but not as sweet as the original) offering that is pretty much like 80% of the recent men’s fragrances, except that I find this one a even more synthetic than most… I find that hard to believe and completely unforgivable. About the only identifiable note that I can determine among the sweet genericness of ∏ Neo is a light anise. The word “generic” has rightly been used in many of the reviews, and that is the exact word that pops into my mind when I smell this. Light sillage and inadequate longevity.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Cynthia Rowley by Cynthia Rowley


    This is a nice, pleasant Floral - Fruity. Fruity / floral is usually the last thing I would call “nice or pleasant” ...I don’t like the genre, but this one is okay because it is relatively subtle and because the florals take precedence – as a matter of fact, I’m not sure that I smell any fruit notes in the mix – they are only sort of hinted at. What I do smell is the bergamot and, I think, honeysuckle in the opening. I later get a definite lily of the valley and heliotrope: All very nice, all somewhat subtle, all having a decent sillage and good longevity. The drydown is a typical white musk and amber, and that, too, is relatively subtle. Cynthia Rowley is a very nice fragrance and I don’t determine anything special.


    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

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    Un Jardin Après La Mousson by Hermès


    I don’t find much similarity between this one and the other two Un Jardin scents – en Mediterranee and Sur Le Nil. This one is fresh and light where the others were sweeter, fruitier, and denser. My first testing of Un jardin après la mousson gave me a synthetic aquatic accord but the syntheticness has diminished each time I tested it. Now I get a cucumber / melon hybrid opening that gradually morphs to pretty much a salty / vegetal honeydew note. The scent basically continues as a melony / salty / aquatic that is light and clear, has good sillage, and lasts. I’m not one who gets a lot of “sweet” from this scent but the drydown seems to be quite vegetal gourmandish with its cucumbery-melon accord and just that hint of salt in the background. I interpret it as aquatic because of the salt and because I have come to think of a prominent cucumber note as representative of an aquatic aroma.

    I’m not crazy about this fragrance – it comes across to me as pleasant but not very original. I do like it the best of the Un Jardin series, but then I strongly dislike Un Jardin Sur Le Nil and I am totally bored by Un Jardin Mediterranee. This is not a garden to me (considering my reaction to the other two… probably a good thing) but even though it’s not a bad scent, I’m not interested… Potent sillage and tenacious longevity.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

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    Wild Woods for Men by Coty


    Worn to be wild! – That’s what the box says… Wild Woods for Men is an uncomplicated and unassuming wood fragrance is not very exciting but is definitely competent for what it purports to be. The box says that it is a “…mixture of exotic cedar, sandalwood, and musk,” which, except for the word “exotic,” is an adequate description. Its woods are pleasant, aromatic and, if they are synthetic, it’s a pleasant syntheticness. Because of its strong aromatic-like ambiance, I can’t decide if it’s synthetic, but there seems to be a bit of unnaturalness in its construction. I don’t really smell the musk that is supposed to in it, but that is not unusual for me when I meet strong woodnotes. It’s a genuine cologne so it doesn’t last very long… its lack of longevity is even shorter than its sibling, Wild Spice, but I don’t see that as a problem, sometimes I want a nice scent that doesn’t last more than a couple of hours. I don’t love it, but I like it and its price makes it a thumbs up.

    07 August, 2009

    foetidus's avatar

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    Polo Modern Reserve by Ralph Lauren


    A simpler, modernized, but still viable version of the famed Polo Green… The resinousness of the original is reduced and so is the leather and heavier herbs like thyme, which makes for a much cleaner, less ponderous presence. It is still green but I think it is less coniferous and more airy. That strong presence of the original that wafted through the halls of the school thirty years ago hasn’t disappeared… it’s just been beautifully reinterpreted and it is unquestionably worthy to reside in the bottle of the original Polo. The green of Modern Reserve is an herbal green – primarily basil tempered by a sharpness-reducing cardamom. There is still a tiny bit too much leather for me, but not enough to keep me from buying a bottle. The softening floral element has been reduced to just a rather abstract jasmine note, and since jasmine is my favorite floral note, you won’t hear me complaining at the simplification. The (possibly dated) quality of the geranium has been removed and the base is a simplified, clear, and long lasting cedar and patchouli with a minimum of soft suede leather. I like this better the original. I had an at-a-distince admiration for the original although I never purchased it because the leather note was a bit too much for me. One sniff of Polo Modern Reserve and I laid down the cash and fulfilled a three-decade desire. I’ve worn Modern Reserve many times and I’m still as pleased as I can be – after all these years I can now wear a version of Polo Green.

    07 August, 2009

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