Fragrance Reviews from December 2010

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    KL by Lagerfeld

    The current bottle I purchased in 2009 seems to have undergone reformulation.
    Top-notes are still there, the interesting mandarine burst giving way to the spicier parts of the fragrance - but a lot seems to be missing from the 80's original. Smelling this fragrance today and wearing it, too, feels uncomfortable and having finished the bottle some minutes ago, I see no need to replace it. Nevertheless, KL still smells much better than many of the recent trendy releases marketed as "sexy" or "seductive" (take the latest "Guilty" by Gucci as an example".)

    10th December, 2010

    jtd's avatar
    jtd
    United States United States

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    Vierges & Toreros by Etat Libre d'Orange

    This is supposed to be a twist on a floral leather. Past floral/leathers have used the juxtaposition of the hard and the soft to lead to an interesting blend. I’m not sure if it’s blend here or just a contrast. The tuberose doesn’t last long, but it makes for an interesting opening. Fairly soon, the dominant note is a plastic/leather accord that lasts through the basenotes. There’s supposed to be a strong animalic vibe here, but I don’t really get it. Maybe that’s what I’m calling plastic, but the artificial quality of plastic seems so far away from raunch in the bodliy sense that I don’t get anything carnal. Just a very clean plastic.

    I know Etat Libre d’Orange is the pixie of the perfume world. They challenge our notions of olfactory beauty. (I’m a fan of Secretions Magnifiques.) And I’m very appreciative that they do. But this doesn’t really seem like a challenge. It’s more that they’ve decided to use an accord that simply appeals to the nose. It’s really a play on tromp la nez. Plastic can smell good. So can gasoline and paper for that matter. I know we don’t usually point these things out when we discuss the art of perfumery, but here’s the evidence. In this case, though, and using the ridiculous gender distinction of the virgin and the toreador as a red herring, we’re distracted from the plastic by a description of florals and leather.

    10th December, 2010

    foetidus's avatar
    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Coeur de Fleur by Miller Harris

    A fruity / floral fragrance — “lightness” is the byword because it’s not quite as sweet as several other fruit fragrances I’ve encountered, and because the scent stays close to the skin — not a lot of sillage. The primary fruit in the fragrance is peach, which I am not usually a fan of, so I consider this well done simply because it doesn’t bother me. The fragrance features a very catching fruity opening that is sweet, with a touch of the sharpness of the raspberry leaf. The middle florals are restrained, too, and form a delicate floral note. Unfortunately, the floral note is almost overwhelmed by the peach from opening. The florals continue into the soft, translucent base of amber and iris — I don’t get much vanilla until the very end of the long lasting dry down, where it continues the translucency and delicacy. Coeur de Fleur is neither a sensual nor an elegant creation — it is an innocent and delicate casual scent, making it quite a bit more feminine than masculine. I don’t see it as unisex.

    Originally submitted 11 February 2007

    10th December, 2010

    foetidus's avatar
    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Aoud Ambre by Montale

    This is another scent that, on paper, smells just as it is supposed to. In the opening, I get a strong amber / moderate aoud accord with a definite honey element and an identifiable rose staying in the background. After a few minutes, I’ve lost the rose but I think I am able to identify a tobacco element in the accord, too; but I’m not absolutely sure. The honey is so striking in mixing with the other notes that it gives the feel of being almost brandy-like. I really enjoy the opening accord—it is playful, animalic, quasi-mysterious, and smooth—incredibly smooth. Even the honey note’s natural sharpness has been tamed to a simmering liquor sweetness, I get no sharpness or poignancy, but rather, that quietly seething honeynote and an undertone of silky animalism. The aoud is there in the background if I look for it, but I am not looking for it. The middle accords enjoy an interplay among the tobacco, the aoud, and the amber—it is a pleasant exercise, and it has enough rose and resinousness to it that the play doesn’t get flighty or meaningless—the fragrance is kept on task. The top and the middle move too quickly. They are delightful and they really should hang around longer than they do because they are replaced by mediocrity. The drydown is probably the dullest I’ve experienced in the Montale line. I don’t get any amber—which is strange—l get an emaciated shadow of an aoud note lost in an bland enormity of what I would guess is a very mediocre patchouli: It is such a flat, muddled accord that it is difficult to identify the notes.
    That was what happened on paper... On my skin it’s not anywhere near the same scent. I immediately get a strident aoud note that smashes all the other notes to oblivion. It is very short lived for an aoud, but when it loses it’s forcefulness, there’s a muddled tobacco / aoud / amber skin type scent that spends its last hour inelegantly dying.

    Originally submitted July 2009

    10th December, 2010

    foetidus's avatar
    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Aoud Lime by Montale

    In the opening, the lime conspires with the aoud to inflict upon the wearer a truly threatening medicinal / eucalyptoid accord—anyway, that’s what I thought the first time I tried it. It’s amazing how, with repeated testings, the nose can become so quickly adjusted to novel accords—by the forth time I tested this, I could not only take it in stride, I had learned to love it. Aoud Lime is a heady stuff—powerfully aromatic and intensely exotic to my aoud-virgin nose. The first accord is powerful and casts loads of sillage; then it transitions into an accord of aoud aromatics / dry herbals / patchouli. Where the top accord projected a potent sillage, the newer, dry patchouli accord stays a little closer to the skin. I’ve met this middle accord in several other Montale aoud fragrances, and I again find it attractive but not compelling, but things improve: Two hours into the fragrance, the rose note appears. At first it comes in the form of a rather dry patchouli / rose accord. As it ages, the rich but discreet rose note continues and is joined by the sandalwood while the patchouli gradually disappears. The last throes of the drydown—hours and hours later—is basically sandalwood with the rose, patchouli, and aoud being mostly beautiful memories. This is a wonderful fragrance.

    Originally submitted 06 April 2007

    10th December, 2010

    foetidus's avatar
    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Royal Aoud by Montale

    Kumquat? Grapefruit? I don’t get no stinking citrus! I get aoud. Aoud in abundance. As usual with an aoud fragrance, I originally smelled that same electrical fire thing that was my first impression of Aoud Pur Oriental. This time it didn’t bother me at all because I know it would take several wearings before my nose and brain adapts to my strangeness to an aoud note. Aoud, as with most strong woods used in scents, completely dominates and submerges the citrus elements (or any other element, for that matter) to my nose. As far as I am concerned, this is an almost pure aoud scent,—I’m not complaining, I love it this way, because aoud has become an addictive note for me: I’m long past the stage where I think of it as insect repellant. As with several other aoud fragrances from Montale that I have tried, a rose note comes to the fore as the potency of the wood wanes. It’s an excellent rose note, and it’s like the calm AFTER the storm. The aoud in Royal Aoud doesn’t seem to last as long as in the other aoud fragrances I’ve tried. I think its lack of longevity is a real weakness, but its aoud is superior. A reticent thumbs’ up.

    10th December, 2010

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    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Sandalsliver by Montale

    On first exposure to Sandsliver, I find a quite docile sandalwood and musk with a strong citrus element. As far as the sandalwood goes, it’s soft and creamy, but the sandalwood doesn’t have much strength until about an hour after application, and even then it’s a rather vague and nondescript sandalwood. It is powdery and it is struggling hard to not be overwhelmed by a persistent green note that is rising up from the middle of the pyramid. The sandalwood eventually succumbs, and is lost to the green which I suspect is violet leaf, because the green note reminds me a little too much of Green Irish Tweed. I agree with zztopp that the movement is somewhat confused and random: Citrus to anemic sandalwood to citrus / green / violet leaf green to powdery musk…just doesn’t work as far as I’m concerned. And I believe there are some miscellaneous elements in here, too; for instance, there are florals in the mix—I catch a whiff of them now and then, and I get some fruity notes in the middle, but these all seem quite random. Of course it is a Montale and there is an inherent quality in the Sandsliver ingredients, including the sandalwood note; but there’s something to be desired in the movement of the scent—it just doesn’t work for me.

    Originally submitted 06 April 2007

    10th December, 2010

    foetidus's avatar
    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Eau de Mûre by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    A bit like Mure et Musc Extreme, except that I don’t believe that it is quite as good as the L’Artisan. Eau de Mûre is quite smooth, linear, and long lasting. It opens very fruity: Citrus, berries, red fruits. For the most part, I find it an excellent opening, but I think that the rose note which pops up from the middle is a bit out of place: While the rose note isn’t disagreeable or annoying, it just doesn’t seem to fit in with the rest of the notes in the opening accord. The accords of the scent are complex, but the scent is actually rather linear. The berries are prominent from the beginning, and they work together with the soft and subtle sandalwood / amber base, which was also present almost from the beginning. The longevity of Eau de Mûre is very good.

    Originally submitted 24 May 2007

    10th December, 2010

    foetidus's avatar
    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Fleurs des Comores by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Vanilla plain and linear. But I certainly applaud the characteristics of this vanilla—not sharp or overly sweet or in any way cloying. This is a mature, creamy, smoky vanilla—one that can hold interest without becoming boring or obnoxious. An elegant vanilla. A vanilla for all seasons. The fruit notes round out the sweetness of the fragrance and give it more depth without overloading or interfering with the vanilla element of the fragrance. There is a nice green note in there that counterpoints the vanilla in a beautifully discreet and supportive way. And the florals are light and warm and minimal. The base is warm and continues with vanilla being the dominant element but with a balanced support from the musk. Every once in a rare while I find a potent vanilla fragrance that doesn’t send me rushing to the washroom to scrub it off. PI is one of them—this one is the other. I’ll stick with PI because I find this one to be quite feminine. Lovely, lovely, lovely fragrance.

    Originally submitted 24 May 2007

    10th December, 2010

    foetidus's avatar
    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Fraîche Passiflore by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Peachy—white peachy, it’s interesting how you can tell the color of the peach from the smell. Unlike calchic, I get mostly white peach. And the passion fruit gives the opening that bit of tropical vibration. As for the berries, you can’t prove it by me, but they are probably there…heaven knows there’s enough sweetness in the fragrance. The whole thing makes for an opening that does not seem very adult, I would say. And the accord continues through the entire run of the fragrance, which ends with a fruit / musk accord. I don’t get any sandalwood or jasmine or pimento, and I get tagette only on paper, not when the scent is actually on my skin. As a matter of fact, on paper, Fraiche Passiflore comes across with much less sweetness and more maturity. It’s a feminine fragrance that has good longevity. I don’t find Fraiche Passiflore very interesting: On paper, it is linear and not very complex; on my skin it is linear, not very complex... and lacks maturity.

    Originally submitted 24 May 2007

    10th December, 2010

    foetidus's avatar
    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Freesia d'Or by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier


    Except for Ofrésia by Diptyque, I’m not really familiar with the Freesia flower or its particular aroma, and I seem to be getting a lot of jasmine, tuberose, and neroli so I can’t quite comment on the extent of the freesia in here. I don’t determine the iris, either—the scent doesn’t seem to be powdery to my nose, and I don’t find the “powderless” iris I’ve encountered in other fragrances. But what I AM sure of is…that this is an abundant—a very abundant—floral scent. It is not light or transparent. It has a substance to it, but it certainly isn’t heavy and it isn’t overly sweet. It’s an excellent floral with a discreet sandalwood in the drydown. Its exuberant floral nature makes it quite feminine IMO; it seems rather linear; and it has very good longevity. Freezia D’Or is thoroughly pleasant and, after the first half an hour, nicely subtle with a delicate floral / sandalwood skin scent aura—a nice, nice feminine fragrance, especially for those who love florals.

    Originally submitted 24 May 2007


    10th December, 2010

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    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Secret Mélange by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    It strikes me as one of the strangest fragrances from MPG that I’ve encountered so far. Strange in the sense that it doesn’t seem like something MPG would make. Unlike many of the other MPG’s, it lacks any kind of drama or panache or even identity. It’s just an odor: not pleasant and not disagreeable not subtle not aggressive … it’s just there with a smell that reminds several people, myself included, of bathrooms. It seems like something Demeter would make: a plain linear scent—no movement, no progression, and no nuance—a copy of an interesting random olfactory occurrence (Demeter picks more interesting random olfactory occurrences than the bathroom accord in Secret Mélange). This particular mélange is one with a predominance of cloves supported by some lavender and some lemony orange and something burned—probably the patchouli. That’s it; that’s all there is: On my skin it is just a ho-hum odor. Certainly not a bad fragrance, but, after an hour or two of smelling it, I’m basically thinking: “What’s the point?” Perhaps Secret Mélange should have remained a secret.

    Originally submitted 22 April 2007, Taiwan

    10th December, 2010

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    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Soie Rouge by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    I wasn’t quite sure what to make of this—something about the opening gives me a LV Piper Nigrum flashback—the same kind of peppery / spicy discordance that opens PN. It’s probably pepper, but it’s also the carnation, as calchic says. I never before realized that carnation could contribute so much in taking over a scent. I don’t really like the top because of the messy blast it offers, but it isn’t long before the discord dissipates and the fragrance settles down a nice but characterless skin scent—very little sillage comes off my skin. I don’t pick up very much in the nature of fruit notes except for the pineapple, which comes across rather weak and actually not very genuine. The scent remains basically a rather non-dominant spicy carnation supported by some quiet musk. Soie Rouge has quite good longevity. It is appropriate for both genders, as IPaid said.

    Originally submitted 24 May 2007

    10th December, 2010

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    apayne182
    United States United States

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    Guerlain Homme L'Eau by Guerlain

    A really fresh and well done citrus scent. This works great and will be my go to in the summer. It is extremely refreshing and smells overall wonderful. it has pretty good projection and longevity for a summer frag. definitely recommend

    10th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 12 December, 2010)

    foetidus's avatar
    foetidus
    United States United States

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    English Breakfast by Mark Buxton

    English Breakfast presents opening that I’m not sure If I should call it “synthetic” or “sophisticated”… I can see it both ways: It’s unique and, while not mysterious, it IS ambiguous. The opening is a citrus / spicy / green / floral concoction that I quite enjoy… synthetic or not. It’s smooth and complex; after the first five minutes, the accord seems to morph into a skin scent: It has picked up a floral texture and I can detect the echo of some woody notes and resins in the background. It would be quite impressive it if weren’t so weak. At this point, the fragrance has little sillage, but it has an almost-good lasting ability as a subtle, refined accord.

    This is a sophisticated scent but on my skin, it is too, too subtle.

    10th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 26 December, 2010)

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    Grottola
    United States United States

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    Tobacco Vanille by Tom Ford

    I've changed my mind - this is getting to be all about honey and less about tobacco on me.

    10th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 19 January, 2011)

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    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Fleur d'Iris by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    The initial inhalation of the opening green notes is potent. Sorry I can’t attest to the first hour of the Fleur d'Iris—unfortunately for me, this fragrance features that violet note (or an iris note - which often smells like violet) that overwhelms my nose. After about an hour the violet note has dispersed to the point where I can determine many of the remaining notes: The first additional recognizable note is the iris. It’s a lovely iris—a little bit raw and natural, but not at all aggressive: More like “perky.” It is not powdery to my nose. I find the rose note and the green notes receding but quite complementary to the iris accord; it’s a very good combination. The amber, vetiver, and sandalwood drydown is somewhat warm and comfortable and also a tad perky. It is a feminine fragrance, but not excessively so. I have to pass on this fragrance because of the violet green note, but it is an unusual and interesting presentation of the iris.

    Originally submitted 24 May 2007, Taiwan

    10th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 07 June, 2011)

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    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Or des Indes by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier


    What I get out of this fragrance is a bit strange, and I don’t identify with what some of the other reviewers are saying. For instance, I don’t get any sweet (except the opoponax itself) and I get a bare minimum of citrus out of the opening. My nose is overwhelmed by an unattractive metallic-leathery accord from the start. I get some opoponax, and there are wood and spices, but the whole fragrance has rather metallic-leathery tinges to it in the top notes and, to a lesser amount, in the mid notes. Normally I love opoponax in fragrances—one of my favorite notes. With Or Des Indes the opoponax is muted and leathery—I’d prefer it rich, sweet, and powdery. And while I’m not exactly enamored of metallic accords, I don’t remember having such an adverse reaction to them: Maybe it’s the particular combination of sandalwood and opoponax that produces that accord that seems so annoying to my nose, or maybe there’s some unnamed leather or castoreum in this fragrance. The accords do improve significantly after an hour…they get very pleasant, but they never get really interesting in my opinion; in fact, with the loss of the annoyance, the fragrance becomes soft, powdery; and that’s the complete story of the drydown—soft, powdery and lacking in interest. Or Des Indes does have a warm ambiance and it has mild sillage, but my nose catches that irritating background note that is difficult for me to ignore, and the drydown is too passive and lacking in interest.

    Originally submitted 06 April 2007

    10th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 07 June, 2011)

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    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Tubéreuse by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    Tubéreuse is a not a very complex fragrance. It’s quite direct and linear—floral and green top featuring a somewhat clear tuberose note with a touch of rose and more than a touch of green. Rather a simply constructed fragrance, it’s pretty much the same floral / green opening that I have met in a few other floral performances by MPG—the plot’s the same, only the star of the show has been changed. I have the same difficulty with this one as I have had with many of the other MPG florals: I think the green notes that are used in the opening are either too strong or not attractive enough—I haven’t quite decided. As far as the tuberose goes, it’s a beautiful jasmine—well, actually I DO get a definite and acceptable tuberose note along with the green notes, but for a pure floral note, the jasmine in this fragrance stands out on my skin more strongly than the tuberose. This is a very nice scent—well made, well proportioned, refined, and I think it is properly classified as a feminine fragrance. There are much better tuberose fragrances to be had IMO: Start with Carnal Flower and Fracas.

    Originally submitted 24 May 2007

    10th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 07 June, 2011)

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    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Datura Noir by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    Very nice tuberose / almond accord—very nice mixed floral. Very nice use of fruit and gum Arabic. I find this fragrance quite enjoyable—it has a lot of breadth and depth to it, and this broad range of floral, fruit, and nut notes appeals to me. I like especially how the florals—tuberose, datura, heliotrope, osmanthus—play a game of team tag with the almond, the coconut, the lemon, the tonka bean, and the vanilla. It’s an active scent that subtly shifts and moves and it is always refined and balanced. It doesn’t have a lot of sillage, which I like; it has an excellent dry down, which I like; and it doesn’t have much longevity, which I don’t like. In the end, it’s an excellent fragrance that just maybe comes a little too close to Quarry’s comment about vanilla hand cream.

    Originally submitted 24 May 2007

    11th December, 2010

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    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Gris Clair by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido


    Gris Clair is an interesting take on lavender—it’s heavy, a bit dark, unique, but cool at the same time. I’m not usually a fan of strong lavender fragrances, but I have actually given serious consideration to this one. I like that it’s not sweet; I love that it’s quite aromatic; I love its darkness. I question that it doesn’t seem to go anywhere—it just sits there being interestingly linear. The drydown is definitely a Lutens creation; it is rich, unique, Oriental, and it has almost impossible longevity. In spite of the excellent drydown, and even though I would rank it as my favorite lavender fragrance, I am still considering if I like Gris Clair enough to buy a bottle. It is an intriguing, beautiful fragrance that deserves a thumbs up. This could be a great fragrance for a lavender fan who might appreciate a completely different take on this interesting note. It's one of the few lavender fragrances I would seriously consider buying.

    Originally submitted 24 May 2007

    11th December, 2010

    foetidus's avatar
    foetidus
    United States United States

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    GFT by Geo F Trumper

    Straight up citrus in the opening volley—an excellent, non-synthetic accord that bubbles with effervescence. It reminds me a bit of a more refined, less minty Monsieur Balmain opening—it’s that bright and lively, and like MB, GTF’s opening is very long lived for a citrus. The herb utilized in the heart notes is the more rarely used tarragon, which makes it rather different from many other citrus / herbal fragrances, and gives the heart notes an atypical warmth —atypical for a citrus fragrance, that is. I must say that the tarragon is beautifully presented because I often have trouble liking accords with that herb. The cedar in GFT is a dominant note, second only to the citrus accord, but this particular cedar is not as domineering as cedar notes can very easily become. In fact, after the bright and lively citrus opening, this fragrance is quite warm, rich, and very well behaved. GFT is a clean and long lasting citrus fragrance with just plain wonderful accords.

    Originally submited 24 May 2007, Taiwan

    11th December, 2010

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    debbborra
    United States United States

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    No. 18 by Chanel

    It opens great. It's almost stinky with ambrette, which can be sharp. Then there's this honeymoon of about oh, two minutes where the sharpness is fading and the sweetness is coming to the fore.

    And then it's over. It's a fruity sweet thing that smells very much a product of a brand for a 21st century department store.

    And if it cost $60 a bottle, I guess that would be alright. But it's almost a down payment on a car, so I want more than just inoffensive and eh.

    11th December, 2010

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    fragranceluvr
    United States United States

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    Lacoste Challenge by Lacoste

    Don't know why all the bad press on this site...I really do like this one. I feel it is a true "sporty" fragrance, meaning, it isn't the typical ocean, ozone, fresh sport fragrance like all the others out there. It has depth to it with some woodsy aspects as well in the dry down but still holds true as a sport fragrance. I feel one can wear this into the office, on the weekends, out with friends, even on a dinner date because the woodsy aspect raises it to a level of casual sophistication. This is a very inoffensive, nice fragrance to have in your collection and a masculine scent too but not loud or obnoxious.
    Lacoste Challenge is sporty, and might I add, "fresh" without being ozone, ocean, clean...it is dry, herbal and woodsy but with a lightness to it. The sillage is moderate and the longevity is a little above average. I do highly recommend getting Lacoste Challenge; it feels as if it could become a "comfort", "go-to" cologne...
    Lacoste Challenge is a new fave of mine...a must have for a cologne wardrobe.

    11th December, 2010

    Rotterdam's avatar
    Rotterdam


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    Voyage by Nautica

    This scent will appeal to MOST people,

    -Want to be the highschool kid who smells fresh, but isn't wearing Di Gio or Lacoste? This is for you.

    -Are you the preppy type?
    This is for you.

    -Are you a professional who doesn't want to offend anyone?
    This is for you.

    You could spray this stuff on your body 7 times and not offend anyone- seriously. Are girls going to stop in their tracks and bask in aroma this cologne gives off? No. Will you get some compliments? Maybe a few. Are you going to get noticed? Not really.


    For a fresh scent, longevity is quite good (6-8 hours). Silage is good for the first few hours, but after the 3rd hour it won't project more than a foot- but people will catch a pleasant whiff as you pass by.

    This fragrance is very fruity and flowery at first, for the first hour you could call it a unisex fragrance. But after it stays on you for a while, you will catch some more masculinity settling in, but the fruit and freshness will still stay in there.

    Here is the reason I gave this a neutral rating- this scent is just too safe for ME. Not saying it is a bad scent, it is just playing it really safe which doesn't match my lifestyle or personality. Most people will really like this though.

    If you are the confident guy that sticks out from the crowd and is willing to take risks, pass this one up. Will I purchase this fragrance again? No. Do I regret buying it? No

    -Pros: Fresh, clean, safe, great longevity for a citrusy fragrance
    -Cons: A little to safe

    11th December, 2010

    Rotterdam's avatar
    Rotterdam


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    Polo Black by Ralph Lauren

    I was given this scent about a year ago, there really isn't much to say about it.

    Want to smell professional? Check.

    Want to smell just "good"? Check.

    Want an innofensive, yet somewhat sexy fragrance? Check.

    Want great longevity? Not happening with this one.

    Want to project across the room? Too bad, this cologne won't do it.

    Want to smell different? Sorry.


    I guess this is just 100% in what YOU want. If your going for a safe, good fragrance. Hit this one up. Not too sure on what to say for the smell. I guess I'd describe it as a very masculine scent, peppery and woodsy.

    11th December, 2010

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    stankyou


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    Blonde by Versace

    stale sour overpoweringly obvious ... not sexy at alll!!! im rather surprised there r people out there who love this,cus i think its probably the worst scent ever!!

    11th December, 2010

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    foetidus
    United States United States

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    Présence Cool by Mont Blanc

    There is quite a synthetic ambiance with this fragrance—synthetic, uber-sweet, light, and short lasting. Again I wonder why Montblanc has chosen to go for the younger crowd with their attempts at fragrance. Bergamot, apple and, they say, bamboo in the opening; jasmine and salt for heart notes—but the presentation of both the top and the middle notes is muddled and synthetic, and the permanent synthetic tang (not entirely unattractive) makes the fragrance seem quite linear: The synthetic tang just doesn’t go away—even in the wood / amber dry down. A mediocre fragrance...

    Originally submitted 24 May 2007, Taiwan

    11th December, 2010

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    sean-dt
    Ireland Ireland

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    New York by Parfums de Nicolaï

    Perfume is a very important part of my life. When a special occasion is coming up, I don't really spend much time thinking about what clothes I am going to wear, but I do think about my scent. The problem is that the fragrance ends up commanding my attention over everything else. but there are times when I just want to smell fantastic, and that's when I choose New York.

    If I were ever nominated for an Oscar or a Nobel Prize, I would probably spend a lot of time trying to choose the perfect scent for the occasion -but at the last minute I might just end up reaching for New York. It's my default choice for a special occasion -unassuming, elegant and always perfect -whether it's part of my grand plan or not.

    11th December, 2010

    sean-dt's avatar
    sean-dt
    Ireland Ireland

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    No. 22 by Chanel

    There is a central stylistic theme running through the classic Chanel perfumes. Yes there are recognisable notes and recurrent themes that coalesce to create the Chanel style, but to me it is something of a mystery –it’s not really about identifying notes. With No.22 however, that broad style has been refined into something tangible -as though Ernest Beaux discovered the Chanel flower and extracted its essence. I am at a loss to understand how a human being could have thought this up. Genius.

    11th December, 2010

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