Fragrance Reviews from December 2010

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    bokaba's avatar

    United States United States

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    Fleur d'Oranger 2007 by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    The opening is a quite nice and natural orange blossom. Perhaps a sweet orange blossom since I like bitter blossom better. Too feminine for me to ever wear--clearly out of unisex territory for me. Like I say the opening is a natural blossom but it is mottled by a synthetic tuberose and some other white flowers. Not my thing. I'd try C & S Neroli first.

    11th December, 2010

    bokaba's avatar

    United States United States

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    Fleur d'Oranger by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    The opening is a quite nice and natural orange blossom. Perhaps a sweet orange blossom since I like bitter blossom better. Too feminine for me to ever wear--clearly out of unisex territory for me. Like I say the opening is a natural blossom but it is mottled by a synthetic tuberose and some other white flowers. Not my thing. I'd try C & S Neroli first.

    11th December, 2010

    bookwyrmsmith's avatar

    United States United States

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    Love and Glamour by Jennifer Lopez

    This is nice .It reminds me of Burberry Brit Sheer-Fruity citrusy ,the florals don't stand out strongly.Oddly though it isn't listed I want to say that I'm sniffing a bit of mint in this-similarto the regular Burberry for women.
    A good basic workday fruity scent it will probably do quite well in it's mass market target audience.
    I would wear it if given it ,buy it if cheap enough/or in a group lot .But I doubt I will seek out Love and Glamour to buy immediately as I already own both of the Burberrys I previously mentioned and it isn't head over heels instant love either.
    Longevity may not be as good as Burberry.

    11th December, 2010

    mrclmind's avatar

    United States United States

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    Zino Davidoff by Davidoff

    I like Zino quite a bit. I've heard this one compared a lot to Guerlain's Heritage. I don't find them all that similar personally. Zino is really sort of a floral fougere with oriental tenancies. The base notes color the entire perfume at the onset. The top notes are not nearly as nuclear as other reviews had led me to believe; they are actually quite stately. The lavender, citrus and slightly herbaceous top notes are sweetened and darkened at the outset by the smoldering scent of tonka, and patchouli from the base. As the top notes burn off, the rose becomes quite prominent with the jasmine and muget accord giving roundness and depth to an already fairly three dimensional rose. The woodiness of santal and cedar in the base rises up next and is sweetened by vanilla and amber. There is a bit of a rasp at the far end of the dry down from the remnants of patchouli and cedar, but nothing that is all that upsetting, but the composition does tend to fall apart just a bit. All in all, Zino is a very nice ride, but it ends rather abruptly. Sprayed on skin I get about 2 or 3 hours, and on fabric 6 hours tops. The sillage seems like it will be fairly aggressive on first application, but Zino very quickly pulls it all in and stays a bit closer to the skin than one might first expect.

    11th December, 2010

    slimbob714's avatar

    United States United States

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    Meehan Bay Rhum by Bonny Doon Farm

    An excellent bay rum . Lasts longer than most. I have the splash but prefer to spray it on. Made from all natural ingredients and smells like it. Does not have overbearing clove note like some bay rums. Balanced and natural

    11th December, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Romeo di Romeo Gigli by Romeo Gigli

    It could be honeysuckle. At any rate, it’s a beautifully fresh / floral fragrance. The top notes are citrus, fruit, and, let’s say, floral—a wonderfully singular floral that flaunts its beauty and purity, supported by a demure plum note and some reticent citrus notes. The floral top eventually joins in the full floral bouquet in the middle level—practically every flower including orchid and rose. This middle level is superbly balanced, surprisingly non fru- fru, and lasts as only a pre 90’s scent can last. The base is a traditional amber, musk, sandalwood—delicate and lovely. All the accords are full, beautifully structured, and tasteful. There’s not a trace of synthetic ambiance in the entire movement. This is a light and refined fragrance that is warm, comforting and absolutely lovely.

    11th December, 2010

    bhougland's avatar



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    Boss Bottled by Hugo Boss

    There are not many times that I throw or give away a scent, but this scent made that list. Image spraying liquefied honey on your skin; all day with a sickly, sweet, fragrance that made me nauseous. Thumbs way down.

    11th December, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Culture by Tabac Blue (new) by Mäurer & Wirtz

    The fragrance opens with a bright, lively grapefruit / green accord that is quite invigorating, if a bit synthetic. Warmth is added to the middle notes with an spicy / floral accord. So far, so good, except that the movement within the pyramid happens way too fast. It’s hard for me to pick up the base because it appears to be entirely too weak. The basenotes read ‘pine’ and ‘sandalwood’ and ‘patchouli’ and musk,’ but my nose has a difficult time catching them. On my skin, Culture is completely gone in forty-five minutes.

    Culture by Tabac could have been a very good fragrance if its base had some sort of substance and longevity. But its base is weak and short-lived, and that's too bad because this one could have been a contender.

    Originally submitted 10 March 2008

    11th December, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Black Orchid by Tom Ford

    It’s a good thing that I had a huge sample: It took me at least ten trials to wrap my brain around this one, to get my nose to respond consistently and close enough to what others reviewers are saying so that I can believe we’re speaking of the same fragrance. My first few tests gave me Nu: Nu with more variety, more breadth, more depth…but Nu, nevertheless. Then came bubble gum—my next three testings gave me bubble gum—grape bubble gum to be exact. Finally, one night after a sushi meal in an excellent Japanese restaurant and half a bottle of very good Sake, I tested Black Orchid again and, there it was: Exotic, fruity, earthy—who knew that fruit, floral and fungi could achieve such a level of vibrancy? Although I recognize its daring, I’m not sure that I even like the opening—along with the impressively dark earthiness it carries an oozy fruity sweetness that I don’t care for—it’s too much: I live near a swamp and if I want that smell, all I have to do is open a window. When the orchid note kicks in, I am reminded of Nu and I can’t rise above that connection. I think that it is an interesting accord, but, in addition to being a bit too feminine for my tastes, it’s nothing that I really want to smell for very long, which is to say that I could enjoy this accord on another, but don’t want it on myself. Also, as others have mentioned, it has been seriously reduced in intensity from the beginning. While it has become quite wearable in that respect, it has lost much of the initial drama and intrigue. The dry down is excellent except that it should manage more substance and sillage. How could it miss with a luxurious lineup like chocolate, incense, patchouli, sandalwood, vanilla, and vetiver? But it perhaps did miss…this is a balanced and refined base, but it is also quite anemic. The thing is, Black Orchid tends to too quickly lose its impact and settle into something more ordinary, and its similarity to Nu means that another Tom Ford variation of Black Orchid can be had at bargain basement prices. No thank you.

    Originally submitted 24 May 2007

    11th December, 2010

    Ken_Russell's avatar

    Romania Romania

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    Trussardi Jeans Men by Trussardi

    I got this dirt cheap and was expecting some slightly gourmand, overly sweet casual frag along the lines of the Jeans range by Versace. Instead, I got a moderately casual scent with a lot of "powdery orange" notes, somewhat similar to Eau d'Orange Verte by Hermes, but with an extra touch of subtly bitter sweetness, even some florals and also fruity notes which fail to be unmanly. May come off as a bit too youthful, lighthearted and uncomplicated at first, but it develops that extra warmth, edge and depth just enough to be suitable for a mature and discerning customer base.

    11th December, 2010

    döfä91's avatar

    Finland Finland

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    Déclaration by Cartier

    This has been my signature fragrance for years. From time to time i get bored for it, and at those times i long for and would use "darker" and heavier scents, but i always find myself coming back to use it.... so i'm kind of hooked on it. It's simply the best fragrance i have tried or used, and i've tried some much more expensive and niche ones as well. Definitely a keeper, i hope this won't be discontinued.

    The sillage is above average, but longevity is average or below. I wish it would last longer. I would describe this fragrance as woody, green, spicy. It gives an aura of confidence, purposefulness, even up till the hint of arrogance. Suitable for office/work/everyday scent, i would not recommend it for sport activities or night out fragrance though. I think this fragrance does not fit in specially shy or sensitive people, but more for energetic, strongwilled and determined persons. Can't be used as unisex of female scent, this is a Masculine scent.

    11th December, 2010

    BetsyMeszaros's avatar

    United States United States

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    Lauren by Ralph Lauren

    I found this in the back of my perfume drawer this morning. I've had it for years. It smells pretty good to me and my husband seems to like it. Not sure it will ever be one of my really big favorites but it is pleasant enough for a Saturday afternoon.

    11th December, 2010

    Backtable's avatar

    United States United States

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    Mambo for Men by Liz Claiborne

    Eugene Levy sporting chest hair, gold chains and a track suit. Faux-machismo that's so over-the-top synthetic it's laughable, and at higher doses, intolerable. This isn't 'bang for the buck,' it's a ten-megaton chemical bomb.

    11th December, 2010

    azulita21's avatar

    Sweden Sweden

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    Sensuous by Estée Lauder

    Lovely feminine varm and cosy scent.

    11th December, 2010

    kpsunil's avatar



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    John Varvatos by John Varvatos

    Great fragrance. Longevity is, well non existent. Projection is weak as well. This gets a thumbs up for the fragrance part.

    11th December, 2010

    kpsunil's avatar



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    H.M. by Hanae Mori

    As one of the reviewers described, a lollipop fragrance. Hard to imagine an adult wearing this.It is sweet throughout.

    11th December, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Metal Jeans Men by Versace

    This is the fresh version of Jeans. Well balanced, highly synthetic—the opening combines citrus, green notes, and a sumptuous watermelon note—refreshing and not too sweet. I can already determine a wood note—gaiiac—rising up from the base—just a touch of it and it is an appropriate wood for matching the opening notes—the gaiiac note is sweet and quite aromatic. It complements the liquidity of the opening and is really an appropriate choice. The jasmine and water flowers of the middle are competent and manage to keep a hold on masculinity. The gaiiac wood from the base has become stronger and has given the middle notes a sweet wood transparency that provides a unique ambiance to the middle floral notes. Then it pulls the fragrance into the base, replacing the florals with amber and musk. The dry down is woody and musky... smoothed out by oakmoss and slightly sweetened by amber. Metal Jeans is a nicely made fragrance, but, all things considered, its freshness lacks enough substance and it is a bit too synthetically cold for my tastes.

    Originally submitted 11 February 2007, Taiwan

    11th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 13 December, 2010)

    Grottola's avatar

    United States United States

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    Xeryus Rouge by Givenchy

    *Sigh*......Xeryus Rouge just does NOT have the kick that it used to have. It's all about velvety fruits and a little spices now, kind of like Polo Sport but a littlen better. I remember an awesome spicy fragrance that really lived up to its moniker. If you're gonna try Xeryus Rouge, the tall, rectangular bottle pictured at the top is the one to look for. The newest version is pretty lame.

    11th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 15 December, 2010)

    kpsunil's avatar



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    Terre d'Hermès by Hermès

    I am a freshman when it comes to this. After reading all the reviews, I have been sampling the usual from Sephora and getting the more exotic from perfumedcourt. Atleast on my skin, the middle note smells horrible. Rotten oranges. I won't wear this.

    11th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 22 December, 2010)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Insensé by Givenchy

    I lucked onto this one. I’d read Luca Turin’s thoughts on Givenchy’s Insensé and was intrigued though I’d never tried it. While visiting San Francisco I found it in a tiny kiosk-sized perfume shop.

    Smitten. This is my favorite perfume.

    One slice of Insensé’s beauty is that I can smell the constituent parts even as I take in the whole picture with a clarity unlike any other fragrance. It’s floral, aldeydic, ambery, woody, herbal. I can smell its fougère shape. I can put together the bergamot, amber and moss and see the chypre. I can isolate the cedar. It’s not the new-style cedar that was about to become the Lutens signature. It smells like cedar essential oil, a high-pitched timber along with a sharp oiliness that reminds me of the sound of an oboe. The layering in Insensé is spectacular. High to low: galbanum & aldehyde, lily of the valley and basil, amber and cedar.

    But forget the bad attempt at description. The perfume you love sweeps you up, captivates you. This one grabbed me by the balls. Not my sole barometer of fragrance quality, but certainly telling.

    Here's my hypothesis about Insensé. Yes, a masculine floral is doomed to failure. But it would never have existed at all as a feminine release. It would have been less handsome. Odd notes like an oily cedar and a bracing basil would never have been included. The reach of the florals would have been curtailed. Maybe it didn’t fail because it was a floral for men, but because it was the best of classical perfumery (disparate elements, focused complexity, beauty greater than one-note prettiness) launched at the point in men’s fragrance where cool met sport.

    A note on reformulation. I believe there have been at least two versions. The first, in the Amarige bottle, is everything I’ve just described. Flawless. The second, in the rounded rectangular bottle, is lovely as well, but they clearly tried to butch it up a bit. Less aldehyde, less muguet, more amber. Still spectacular.

    11th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 17 January, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Musc Nomade by Annick Goutal

    I always wonder about this one. It’s made with a large serving of muscone, a musk with high molecular weight. Apparently the musks to which people are anosmic are these large ones. What does this smell like to them? To me it’s lovely.

    My take on MN is that it has the softness and rounded fruity sweetness of the non-threatening wing of musk fragrances, “white musks, “ but also the complexity over time that the beastier musks have. This is more baby skin than rank armpit. There is a little of the waxy quality common to some musks, but the note that really fixes itself to the sweetness is the booziness. Booze and baby-skin. If that’s not enough complexity, consider therapy.

    Once into the basenotes, MN wears close to the skin but also loses some sweetness, becoming a bit woody. MN’s drydown has a long trajectory and traces of woody berry sweetness drift up to your nose 12 hours after applying it. I love that this has the happy-happy angles of the clean musks, but the complexity-without-skank of the heavier musks. I keep wedging MN between the two ends of the musk spectrum that I’m positing, and I shouldn’t. If anything, the center area that MN seems to occupy shows that moderation can be a smart and definitive choice and not just a compromise.

    A great scent for SoCal dry summer nights.

    11th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 16 February, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Nahéma by Guerlain

    Nahema smells like rose the way Paco Rabanne’s Metal smells like green flowers, which is to say scarcely at all. I know it’s hardly a secret that Nahema is a virtual rose, an implied rose. I see the parts, but I don’t see the rose. Not a complaint, mind you. I love Nahema. I see it as the spiritual predecessor to Gucci Rush. It’s Rush’s disco auntie.

    I know that Nahema took advantage of new-at-the-time aromachemicals that were used elsewhere to amplify and extend actual rose. Here these chemicals are used to create a perfume of crystalline flowery fruit with balsams and wood. Actually this smells like a peachy iris on a base of Guerlain’s earlier stunner Chamade. The heartnotes are like Chamade’s, but stoned and giggling.

    In the long run, the rather chemical nature of Nahema allows the fragrance to be focused on abstract qualities. Nahema isn’t floral. It’s glassy and shimmering, and its upper register is about an inch from shrill. These qualities give it it excitement and vibrance. Does it simulate a rose? Not to me. Is it a blast to wear? Every single time.

    11th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 26 February, 2011)

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Vetiver Oriental by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido


    Intriguing…After sporadically testing this over a period of three months, I’m still not sure what I think about it. One minute I think that I’m smelling some wonderfully edgy accords, the next minute I feel that I’m not sure that I like what I’m smelling. The opening is an unusual one: It has a lot more going on than the typical vetiver fragrance. There’s iris, green, gaïac, and balsam in quite a unique accord—especially for a vetiver fragrance. This is one of those accords that challenge. It’s a little bit sweet and sharp and quite a bit aromatic and resinous. I believe that the gaïac note has a lot to do with the aromatics and the uniqueness: the myrrh can account for a lot of the resinous vibration; and the licorice provides the tar-like sweet note. I don’t get a clear chocolate note. To my nose the vetiver functions at the edges of the fragrance rather than in the mainstream of it, and, if I have a problem, this must be a part of it: I love vetiver, and I would like a stronger vetiver presence in this fragrance. The base is sumptuous with typical Serge Lutens ambiances and longevity. This is an excellent fragrance—at least I think so most of the time...other times I’m not so sure. What I really like about Vetiver Oriental is the gaïac note and, also, that I find it a quite wearable fragrance—probably more wearable than most vetivers.

    Originally submitted 24 May 2007

    11th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 07 June, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Youth Dew Amber Nude by Estée Lauder

    Nice-smelling amber saved from simplicity by a dull rubber note that balances the amber’s syrup. (Also, less youth Dew than Cinnabar.)

    11th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 30th September, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Habit Rouge by Guerlain

    I find Habit Rouge simple, precise, complete. Knowing Guerlain’s approach, and even in light of its 2003 streamlining, HR’s composition is likely more complex than my nose is able to make out. It is traditionally three-tiered: bergamot/lime, orange blossom, oppopanax. The oppopanax is really there all the way along. Its powderiness cuts the tart citrus opening and sweetens the body-odor feel of the orange blossom. I don’t get a trace of the leather that others mention.

    In the end, and the basenotes arrive pretty quickly, it rides a sweet-and-sour balance. Powdery sweet oppopanax, sweaty orange blossom. Very pretty, very human.

    11th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 30th September, 2011)

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

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    Antilope by Weil

    I love the opening – I find it unusual and quite elegant with its “lilting blonde softness” chamomile (beautiful description, Calchic) and excellently presented aldehydes. It’s not long before Antilope Eau de Parfum moves to an indole-laden, rather ‘50s powdery-floral accord with jasmine, lily of the valley, orris, and rose all definitely exhibiting their charms in the heart notes. I don't find it very original but I, personally, can’t complain because its heart has turned Antilope into a compulsively sniffable affair. So far, this EdP reformulation delivers quite well. The drydown, though, is a disappointment. True, I’m happy the leather doesn’t rise up and bite me, but none of the other notes do have much of an effect either. For me the base dies… no iris, patchouli vetiver… only some anemic amber, a half-hearted cedar, a spongy leather, and a characterless musk. The base comes across very weak to me. I don’t know where the problem is, but I do have a problem finding enough substance in it.

    I would love to have sampled the vintage offering

    11th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 22 November, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Chamade by Guerlain

    Chamade is exceptionally thoughtfully composed.

    Chamade uses scent to illustrate texture and time. The timeframe suggests lushness and leisure. As for texture, think of juiciness, waxiness, powderiness all braided together. It’s alternately each of these and then all simultaneously. The textures give a sense of gravity and dimension. There is a dense core with other bits hovering around it like a layered atmosphere.

    11th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 03 May, 2012)

    Joe_Frances's avatar

    United States United States

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    Old England by Hugh Parsons

    Being a huge fan of Traditional Blue and 99 Regent Street, I was looking forward to a 50ml bottle of Old England coming to me from Germany with keen anticipation. Unfortunately, as yet, this fragrance has not wormed its way into my heart. It is very modern, full of citrus, it's a fruit vendors delight. It is also aquatic in the "me too" tradition of current issues from just about everybody. There might even be banana in there somewhere. Very modern doesn't really conform to a view of "Merry" Old England. I don't get the connection at all. Not bad, and would be fine in the summer, but it is neither particularly English nor Old (as in traditional). Just wait, as with 99 Regent St. which didn't appeal to me at first, I bet next year I will love it. But for now with over six months together........eh...... Sorry, Hugh Parsons, I love you guys, but this one seems like a dead miss to me.

    11th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 24 January, 2013)

    pimiento's avatar

    United States United States

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    Soul by Curve for Men by Liz Claiborne

    It just smells like more potent deoderant. That being said, I can't find anything wrong with it and my gift set (which came with very nice shaving balm) came to only $12.

    12 December, 2010

    pimiento's avatar

    United States United States

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    Curve for Men by Liz Claiborne

    For an everyday, non-offensive fragrance this is great. It's leafy and fresh, yet at times dry and a the woods in it a bit more evident. Very cheap too although you wouldn't know from smelling it.

    12 December, 2010

    Showing 481 to 510 of 1243.