Fragrance Reviews from December 2010

    Showing 571 to 600 of 1241.
    's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    Eau Fraîche by Elizabeth Arden

    This one was released in the 70's - and not in 1986 - I am 100% sure of this, because I wore it at school when I was 13 ... - and that was NOT in 1986.
    It's a fresh Eau with a strong, very rustic lilly-of-the valley note. Very striking - and long-lasting for a so-called Eau fraiche. Memorable and original.

    12th December, 2010

    Diamondflame's avatar

    Singapore Singapore

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Vetyverio by Diptyque

    A predominantly green vetiver fragrance with a nice citrusy lift that extends far into the heart, probably on the back of the seamlessly blended rose and geranium. I don't get much spice by way of drydown but the scent, light as it may seem at first, projects rather prominently, playing hide-and-seek with your nose exactly the way Off-Scenter described in his earlier review. In fact, this is the part I admire most about it. This is one delightful vetiver that even non-vetiver fans would enjoy! And if Creed Original Vetiver isn't already in my wardrobe, I'd probably have bought VETYVERIO.

    12th December, 2010

    Kalynne's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Cepes and Tuberose by Aftelier

    I tested this scent yesterday at the Aftelier sale. Very interesting yet elegant scent. It starts with a hint of earthy mushroom and the herbal woods that surround it. At this point it's very grounding similar to oakmoss, but much richer. After an hour or so, it emerges from the forest floor and goes floral with the rich tuberose and the earthiness is its foundation. It was still present 5 hours later. I think that's pretty good for a natural scent. Just reapply, it's worth it for the experience. It's on my short list to purchase after my Carnal Flower is finished.

    12th December, 2010

    nonnative's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Trésor (new) by Lancôme

    I can't understand why the new versions of good perfumes are so watery and cheap. It's seems to be a deliberate trend and not a casual side effect. For tresòr this is what happened: a nice soft and round fragrance lost its personality. What a nuissance.
    The organic peach that is so classy in mitzouko developed into a supermarket juice fruit diluted in water. I'm really sorry because I remember the original trésor and I liked it. In memory of the old version I gave this new a "neutral". It would otherwise be a "thumb down".

    12th December, 2010

    nonnative's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Divine by Divine

    Luxory parfume without personality. It seems a contraddiction, I know. But with this perfume I got complimented but ... I did't feel special while I wore it. And also it disappeared suddenly after an hour and half. Honestly I can't see any comparison with chloe.

    12th December, 2010

    Redbeard's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Vie de Chateau by Nicolaï

    This falls into what I'd call a unisex sweet, smoky green hay category, almost like a variant of Devin that's been semi-feminized with florals, or Richard James plus smoke. Interestingly enough, LuckyScent considers it masculine, so the Basenotes directory is wrong either way; I'm assuming LS decided this because a lot of the earlier florals seem to be violet. Mostly it's tobacco on florals, which isn't really my thing (in fact normally I hate this) but it's well-done for what it is. Ultimately it reminds me of incense, but of the more floral, less woody or spicy bent, and stays away from the moldy or musty character of Tsar, which I also place in this family. It's still too floral for me, but if I were forced to pick a masculine floral, I'd easily take this over a lot of the heavier ones that get such rave reviews. Still, I'd ultimately prefer to go the pure violet route with Ajaccio Violets.

    12th December, 2010

    Redbeard's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Royal English Leather by Creed

    This reminded me a lot of Royal Bain de Caron, but with slightly less violet. They're equally archaic, and equally bubblegummy. I won't go off on my usual "it's too feminine" rant because it's from such a different era that the criteria were different. Here in the modern world, though, it leaves me with a super-heavy boutique soap-bar smell, and almost no leather whatsoever (am I missing something!?). I wouldn't object to this smell in the form of a cherub-shaped guest soap on a red heart-shaped doily in a fancy, secluded Bed and Breakfast bathroom (though I'd die of cutesiness overdose), but for myself to smell like this just doesn't compute. It overwhelms me in an unwelcome way.

    12th December, 2010

    PerfumeCollector's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Curve Crush for Men by Liz Claiborne

    Another generic "aquatic" from the hordes of aquatics in the market. I could not distinguish this perfume from legions of other scents out there, but I guess it is a "youthfull" scent. Probably guys graduating from AXE/LYNX will be inclined to this type of fragrances, but old farts like me expect much more from a perfume.
    It doesn't smell bad, mind you, actually is kinda pleasant, but it doesn't do it for me, period.
    The pyramid looks so atractive, but the result is cheap smelling and indistinguishable from other hundreds so similar that smells identical.

    12th December, 2010

    Grottola's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Fuel For Life pour Homme by Diesel

    Nope! Another lame-ass fruity sweet fresh fragrance that plays a part in the de-masculinization of men's fragrances. Not even the Anise in the top could save this tea cooler. Next!

    12th December, 2010

    Ken_Russell's avatar

    Romania Romania

    Show all reviews

    rating


    L'Essence de Déclaration by Cartier

    I may not be in tune with the general opinion about this or my nose may just be underdeveloped/touched by olfactory fatigue, but I just love this one. Citrus and spice may be a dominant here, but I also get a touch of "powdery florals", yet still very manly and even slightly dark in this one. Also, a very rich note of exotic woods towards the end, almost in tune with a powerhouse frag from an earlier decade, thus, so far I perceive this one as having a mature, yet not dated or overly heavy styled, in fact, it seems to gravitate successfully between something very ethereal and fluctuating on one hand, something very earthy, burly and masculine in an imposing, yet not overpowering, style.

    12th December, 2010

    jasmine_dream's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Coco Mademoiselle by Chanel

    There's a complexity and maturity to this scent that I just love. Though the notes are different it in someways reminds of the sophistication of Jasmine Noir. I think this is a classy, mature lady scent - though I know Chanel markets this to the younger ladies. Oddly I haven't liked the traditional Chanel scents, but this is now in my top 5. From a cursory perception it stirkes me as a fruity-spicey scent and less floral.

    Overal I feel "transported" when I wear this, and any scent that can do that is impressive!!!

    12th December, 2010

    nonnative's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    English Lavender by Atkinsons

    When I was pregnant I used to shower with a bar of a lavander soap. I tried to find the same clear relaxing and self aware scent. English Lavander is not only a clean scent but ends up with a woody drydown that makes a classical lavender something more distingushable and original. What I like about it is that can be layered on any other lavander product (soap, talc) adding to the mix an distinctive note. I feel good when I wear lavender but I am always afraid of givin an unsofisticate impression. This fear is minimised wiht English Lavender.

    12th December, 2010

    cubargentina's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    Xeryus Rouge by Givenchy

    Xeryus Rouge is a beautiful perfume, I congratulate the creators and givenchy by this masterpiece, I'm a fan of Xeryus rouge, yesterday I went to a party and I sprinkle two drops, the girls were watching constantly, I had wondered what perfume is a men's fragrance that is very bnien as you enhanced in all aspects, I'd buy in a store in Buenos Aires, my first high-end perfume, and the saleswoman showed me very many perfumes, but when I smelled it I fell in love, is a sublime perfume, in Buenos Aires many people use this fragrance and is a luxury I could smell this while walking down the calle.Ojala never ends this fragrance because it really is spectacular, Test it and not going to arrependir.Gracias Givenchy, the truly the best of the best!

    12th December, 2010

    manicboy's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Eau des 4 Voleurs by L'Occitane

    One of L'Occitane's more understated fragrances but it retains a charm all its own. Has a strong orange presence on top that lasts throughout the drydown. Pine and herbs(basil and oregano) round out the basenotes that recall an aroma from a kitchen in a log cabin deep in the woods manned by an Italian chef. Hard to classify and certainly far from the maddening crowd of current masculine fragrances. 4 Voleurs is for those looking for an interesting fall/winter frag with a low-key stature.

    12th December, 2010

    Sunsetspawn's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Royal English Leather by Creed

    I find it interesting that this scent is polarizing. I suppose the "urinal cakey" nature of REL's opening could be to blame. But the top notes wear off quickly, and once they do you're left with a mildly pleasant, luxury car interior. I enjoyed the experience of wearing this; always having that quiet leather in my nose was nice. That said, I don't want to smell like this. I am not a car seat. I just don't feel that it's a person smell.

    A little salt and spice could've done wonders for this fragrance.

    12th December, 2010

    PaladinX's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    The One for Men by Dolce & Gabbana

    Based on the smell itself, I would give it a thumbs up for sure. It has a very tropical, fruity, sweet scent that reminds me a little bit of a cross between fruit punch and pina colada. But because the longevity and projection is so bad on my skin, I have to give it a thumbs down unfortunately.

    12th December, 2010

    rainmaker's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Hugo by Hugo Boss

    Used to own this, and girls went crazy for it.
    The opening is delightful, and stays very nicely on the skin for a couple of hours. However, a non-descript dry down follows that great beginning, which is a shame. Otherwise it would be a perfect scent.

    Edit: Just bought another cheap bottle of this. Despite all its shortcomings, I really think it's great stuff and it is a great value. Another plus is that it's not that popular any more, so it is actually a really unique smell and it certainly gets ladies' attention.

    12th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 04th January, 2011)

    nonnative's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Diorissimo by Christian Dior

    I recently put my hands on a vintage sample. So what I write is about the vintage version of this masterpiece. I fear the new version is not as good. Great soliflore. Perhaps the only one I appreciate and would wear (I normally prefer more complex works). Sharp and crispy, a spring windy and sunny day. Great simphony for a great composer as Roudnistka. A feminine touch of class for girls and ladies alike.

    Tried the new formula. No disappointment. Perhaps less sharp, but still a great creation. And strikingly non retrò.

    12th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 12th March, 2011)

    sh_02's avatar

    Germany Germany

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Eau Givrée by Avon

    For me it's actually one of my favourites during the dry european summers, which are mostly dry, but in whish often happen repeatedly thunderstorms.
    Throughout, Eau Givrée never fails to refresh and liften my mind...

    The citric and lavender notes don't come off harsh and too zesty but uplifting and balanced - and thanks to the musk (which thankfully lacks the *typical-AVON-muskyness*) it receives depth and a powdery based aspect.

    I have other citrus-themed fragrances,too - but with this I don't have to think if I'm in the mood. Kind of reminds me a bit of TOVA Signature, if memory serves me right.

    12th December, 2010 (Last Edited: 05th July, 2011)

    scentsitivity's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    GFT by Geo F Trumper

    GFT is an bright masculine, highlighted by a fairly persistent lemon note and the herb tarragon, which gives this fragrance a unique character. Drydown is musky. I don't see this as cypress or cedar centered at all. A pleasant fragrance.

    13th December, 2010

    shamama's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Divin'enfant by Etat Libre d'Orange

    Marshmallow & diapers. Meh.

    13th December, 2010

    shamama's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Sécrétions Magnifiques by Etat Libre d'Orange

    Thumbs up not because I "like" the smell but because it's such a major conceptual leap a perfumer to invest the time and money in a fragrance that's as ghastly and unpleasant as this. Like Warhol's Electric Chair series or Andres Serrano's "Piss Christ", it explores an olfactory concept that's unpleasant but a frank part of life.

    I received a 10 ml bottle as part of an amazing Etat Libre D'Orange coffret ... as I made my way through the collection, I dabbed some on, honestly knowing nothing about what I had in store. I was floored / repulsed / horrified / confused ... and immediately googled it and was delighted by hours of "smelling" videos of people's live reactions to this on YouTube (this one being my favorite: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dOSjF3bCEBc)

    One of the things that makes this fragrance extraordinary is that you only need to smell this ONCE: The scent memory will forever be etched into your brain. Sometimes I just go near the bottle and I swear I can smell the pernicious aromas leaching through the glass.

    How many other perfumes can you say that of?

    13th December, 2010

    le mouchoir de monsieur's avatar

    France France

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Reed Krakoff by Reed Krakoff

    Everything Reed Krakoff does has a very distinct singularity about it. Reactions to his sudden appearance on the luxury market have been equally singular: His clothes, his handbags, all have a distinct lilt of a kind of new modernity very heavily under the influence of the current voque for steam-punk faux neo industrialism, but thankfully, not obviously so: Evoking Bauhaus, a kind of German undertone, and a not particularly easy to define austerity that has had most fashion editors using the words "Military-Inspired" to describe it. It is true that the man has a kind of austerity about him--his entire "universe" is so very sleek, even ironically somehow threatening. Reed Krakoff is a confident designer and it shows in everything he touches; many have equated this very strong hand and specific tastes to a kind of nouveau arrogance. The fact that Reed Krokoff himself is straight, not particularly handsome nor bubbly has not helped to endear him in any way to the fickle fashion press: Were he younger, openly gay and physically attractive it is certain that the world would be screaming about the advent of a new great American Heritage Life style Brand: But they're not. They're saying "How dare he launch such a thing in the midst of a recession." This is so disquieting when considering how all of Reed Krakoff's creations are so exquisitely made--down to the last detail, everything thought out in a very cerebral way, with intelligence inherent throughout. Jean Patou launched "Joy," the most lavishly expensive perfume ever blended, in the middle of the Great Depression, and that was surprising; equally so RK's first foray in fragrance is indeed a kind of nose snub to the perils of poverty. The austerity misinterpreted by many as being "military" in nature actually comes from an apparent love affair the creator has with barefoot boxing and professional wrestling: Explaining why the word "butch" could be applied to many of the visual effects that make up this new and exciting brand; Interesting that it is all directed to women. Very frankly the first high luxury fashion interpretation of "the New Age of Austerity." The fragrance, which is packaged with a refinement rarely seen today, is presented in a way that truly is groundbreaking. One gets to choose the color of the flacon, and each is entirely made by hand, with an emory glass stopper, bottle and stopper individually nestled in an intriguing coffin-like box with secret compartments that hold the juice separately in pyrex vials and a beautiful funnel of RK's signature gunmetal. I got a tester sent to me about a month prior to the launch of this fragrance, and I've been testing it ever since: The first detail that hits you when spraying is a kind of surprise. It smells like nothing else--and in it's flight evokes lead pencil shavings soaked in rose water with a casablanca lily note not too far off in the distance. It's fairly linear, and does not change much during the evolution of the dry down. The main qualities of it are as follows: It's light and fresh, but in a novel sense--it smells herbaceaous and floral in a specifically non-perfumery kind of way; almost shockingly so. To smell it you're somewhat perplexed, wondering if it's "on purpose," or, if it's perfume at all--it smells "real," as if the fragrance it emits is not perfume but some kind of environment. It never gets heavy--and it dries down to nothing the way some of the Classic Guerlain Eaux do, leaving the faintest hint of softness that's barely noticeable and could be mistaken for natural body chemistry. It is compelling mainly for this reason--wearing it makes one feel as if they are carrying a kind of enormous conservatory of flowers and exotic fauna about with them--but never reminds the wearer that it is an actual scent. It's ultra light but remarkable with a very faint sillage that, again, could be easily read as a natural body smell--albeit a really fresh one: It by no means has any sweatiness or funk in any part of its character. To sum it up--Fragrance and Bottle are two different discussions. The fragrance is pleasant, original, but escapes any "genre" classification that is specific. It's watery, clear, transparent, but not in the same way as an Eau d'Issey or a Cristalle or (gulp) CK One. If you like the smell of a wood shop that happens to have an enormous bouquet of casablanca lilies, tea roses and fragrant hyacinths in it and is also equipped with a ventilation system that pipes in medical grade pure oxygen you'll love this. It seems more feminine than masculine but I wore it for several days and never felt fey. Considering all the thought and time that was put into it, a reasonably priced high luxury item if you have that kind of taste and money, and you happen to find the smell appealing. RK will be a love/hate thing there's no doubt: Some people will not understand it at all, mostly because it just doesn't follow any rules and smells like no other fragrance, others will love and cherish it for exactly the same reasons. A neutral for me--but A+++ for effort and fearlessness.

    13th December, 2010

    Weimar27's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Bora Bora for Women by Liz Claiborne

    It opens with a sweetness that consists of sweet mandarin and water lily it surprises me that Bora Bora and Alfred Sung Shi both
    have a cloying to the skin style and opens
    sweet and watery but shi is more woodsy and deeper in Incense more superior staying power then Bora, bora dries to a honey like scent of tuberoses that dominates this perfume completely overshadows the other notes orchid is an
    elusive to the senses hard to find but it's in there. ginger faint traces of it
    barely noticible is there any sandalwood in this thats hard to tell
    unless you have an scent of an Canine
    but to my senses no dice.

    13th December, 2010

    Weimar27's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Liz by Liz Claiborne

    I like the lovely opening of sweet peonies
    with an air of mimose with ripe fruity
    pear and watery melon it's fleets from my nose and turns to a dry and sour scent of Red Pepper Caught me off which it was a bit repulsive the other notes likes magnolia honeysuckle hyacinth heliotrope
    are hard to detect but i do smell amber
    faint dose of it.

    this has an similar concept with Cerruti
    Image Woman when i first sprayed onto
    my skin it was a nice citrus a few seconds later it turned to stench of manure the suede note is responsible for that Liz turns sweet then it turns sour
    the next it's not a bland plain fragrance it's quite interesting but i wouldn't buy it because of the pepper drydown.

    13th December, 2010

    NonScents's avatar

    Croatia Croatia

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Kenzo Power by Kenzo

    Flower/Power. A fragrance of opposites, a floral for men (though hardly a new idea). I get some lovely menthol notes after the top has gone away, but I think it's generally a bit much for me, too much going on, I've never been able to stomach a stew. But this has enough interest in it for a thumbs neutral. Too "modern synthetic" for me.

    13th December, 2010

    rickbr's avatar

    Brazil Brazil

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Silver Bond / Andy Warhol Silver Factory by Bond No. 9

    Is interesting how time can change the perception of the notes in a specific scent. It`s like you perceive some details as dominant and others as part of the background of the composition, and them, after some time, you have the opposite vision. The scent didn`t changed, but the way you see it at your skin has changed.
    This happened to me with Silver Factory. I remembered it when i tried two years ago as an metallic iris and violet fragrance, where you had a smoky-soft incense at the background. Then, today, it seems that the incense is the main theme, and now i only perceive the metallic iris and violet as secondary characters. Silver Factory has that mineral warm incense that Aurelien Guichard had used again in Kenzo UFO. Both seem like studies on warm, soft, spicied incense. Here the incense is more resinous, woody, complex, and has something metallic, silverish, that matches the theme perfectly. For me, it seems to go more on a male direction, but it suits well a woman that loves incense too.

    13th December, 2010

    perfaddict's avatar

    Nigeria Nigeria

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Léonard pour Homme (original) by Léonard

    “Strong, dark and brooding” are the words a certain sage used to describe this scent. Leonard pour Homme is an exemplar of 80s scents – scents of a period when disco was king, when Christmas was called by its proper name, when letters were still the main medium of communication and the acronym “IFRA” would have been thought to be for a lethal exotic virus or neuro-toxin.

    Leonard pour Homme, leather chypre par excellence, introduces itself with spicy olfactory fanfare – basil and thyme prominent in the fore. When the lovely screeching recedes a bit, wormwood/artemisia attains prominence. Smokiness also emerges, i guess, from patchouli and cedar oil among other ingredients of the frag. Perhaps because I live in the tropics and naturally exposed to direct heat sometimes, it is not long into the wearing that the animalic castoreum and leather ingredients ascend into my conciousness. Resinous labdanum sings in harmony with the smoke-sodden leatheriness to deliver an accord that may be a bit scary to the Acqua di Gio crowd. There is not a smidgen of sweetness in this frag. Baroque pipe organ music and the eerie sound of ghosts and crazed bats seem to be the appropriate sound track for LpH.

    LpH is similar to Van Cleef and Arpels pour Homme, but less flowery. It also reminds me of Francesco Smalto pour Homme, but is a bit more herbal and oily; Trussardi Uomo without the tobacco notes, or a more resinous Bel Ami. In all its darkness LpH is not a room-strafing powerhouse like Trussardi pH. Lph has mazing longevity. 9+ hours after applying I still get authoritative whiffs of leathery darkness.

    I came upon this frag late, but with it in my wardrobe now the rest of my life will surely be fragrantly richer.

    13th December, 2010

    malabah's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Kenzo Amour Florale by Kenzo

    To me this is Fleurs de Citronnier by Serge Lutens made smoother. The Neroli is not as sharp and the musk comes in more prominent doses. An improved version of an already beautiful little beast!

    13th December, 2010

    Diamondflame's avatar

    Singapore Singapore

    Show all reviews

    rating


    L'Eau by Diptyque

    If you like your fragrance dry and spicy, you should try L'EAU. But do leave your preconceived notions of "l'eau" at the door for this is not your garden variety 'eau'. There's a lot of cloves over cinnamon bark, softened just a touch by a fuzzy non-distinct floral. Smells somewhat potpouri-sh if you ask me. And masculine to boot.

    L'Eau is probably best enjoyed from a distance, not up close. Especially if you are sensitive to cloves. But I wouldn't really worry given its modest projection. I didn't quite like it at first but with subsequent wearings I grew to appreciate its rustic charm. Rather like taking a vacation off the beaten track. Nice one, Diptyque!

    13th December, 2010

    Showing 571 to 600 of 1241.




Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000