Fragrance Reviews from December 2010

    Showing 781 to 810 of 1242.
    leclercq's avatar

    Slovakia Slovakia

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    Hugo Energise by Hugo Boss

    The signature scent of John Doe.

    18 December, 2010

    kingkutty's avatar

    United States United States

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    Burberry London for Men Special Edition by Burberry

    Beautiful fragrance. A hint of original Burberry london without the strong christmas tree accord. If orginal London's christmas tree accord is turned up to a 10, London special has the christmas tree on a 4. A nice amber accord has been added which gives it more warmth. This one is blended quite nicely and the woods in it even the fragrance out and makes it very smooth and pleasant. This one is a 10 in my book and i'll be wearing it very often this season. Sweet, spicy, warm, manly, sexy. Thats London special edition.

    18 December, 2010

    Inscentz's avatar

    United States United States

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    Allure Homme Sport Cologne by Chanel

    This stuff is terrible, and I feel terrible to say so because I love Chanel fragrances but this is not even close to as good as Allure Sport EDT. Too citrusy, and lacks many things, I dont even know where to begin. I have a 5 oz bottle as well if anyone wants to swap who likes this stuff!

    18 December, 2010

    Weimar27's avatar

    United States United States

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    24, Faubourg by Hermès


    An elegance of golden splendor; 24 Faubourg is an modern reincarnation of
    L'Heure Bleue by Guerlain Fresh green
    notes opens crisp and bright in a few
    minutes dries to a sweet note of peach
    and airy Hyacinth ylang ylang dries with an velvety texture that ends the top note, Delicate white petals of gardenia
    opens the middle note with an buttery
    scent Jasmine with it's green herbal
    earthy feel Iris adds to the mournful
    spell of Faubourg.

    The basenote dries to an powdery touch
    of Sandalwood Amber warms the senses
    and ends with the eluvsive scent of
    patchouli. 24 Faubourg conjours for me
    a Autumn evening glows with an amber
    sunset with an feeling of wistful yearning as you walk though the tree lined street smelling the aroma of golden leaves caresses your senses
    and the beauty of the colors gives you
    a sense of nostalgia 24 Faubourg is a
    rarity in perfumery it's not rushed though the fragrant markets it's a well
    crafted beauty that took their time
    with every note and how that note works
    on that consumer it's a perfume with an
    old soul and a autocratic aura that i find Positive.

    18 December, 2010

    hanna.sunden's avatar

    Sweden Sweden

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    Eau Mega by Viktor & Rolf

    So disappointing, this one. I totally agree with the previous reviewer, what I mostly got was heaps of melons thrown at me, in addition to an unpleasant synthetic fruity note that appeared more clearly in the drydown, could it be pear? Strangely, after a few hours it turned out very similar to Laura by Laura Biagiotti (which is pleasant enough but very tame). Could it be an aquatic note in combination with violet leaf?

    Anyway, this is a fragrance that's the opposite of its name. Waste of time, waste of money.

    18 December, 2010

    Trauerkraut's avatar

    Netherlands Netherlands

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    Bleu de Chanel by Chanel

    Why re-invent Xeryus Rouge?

    18 December, 2010

    Quarry's avatar

    United States United States

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    parfums*PARFUMS Series 3 Incense: Ouarzazate by Comme des Garçons

    Fellas, choose Ouarzazate if you're looking to attract a gal you can take home to meet Mom (I don't see this fragrance being as effective in the bar scene as in the office). Overall it reads like a sweet, non-astringent/non-tannic cedar. The incense is not particularly obvious. I can wear it, and any woman could, but I'd prefer to catch it on the breeze from a man passing by.

    18 December, 2010

    credence's avatar



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    L'Eau D'Issey pour Homme by Issey Miyake

    Long story short about this fragrance is, if you like the smell of high quality GREEN TEA, you'll love L'Eau D'Issey pour Homme.

    18 December, 2010

    PaladinX's avatar



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    Calvin Klein Man by Calvin Klein

    Brands like Ralph Lauren or CK, that do not have fancy french names and could be found in any bargain bin across the country will never get any credit from the fragrance community. For them to get credit, they would have to produce something totally ground breaking. And this is not a ground breaking scent. But it is a nice one to me. Perhaps if the juice was put in a niche fragrance bottle, people would enjoy it more. There really isn't much to dislike. Its nothing super unique, but at the same time, it has its own flavor. I haven't really smelled anything yet that smells exactly like this. BUt it is a very fresh, non offensive clean scent that combines fresh minty feeling with violet and musk, It changes into a more woody fragrance at the end. I really like it, and I have gotten many compliments from it. The longevity and projection is pretty good for a fresh smelling scent.

    18 December, 2010

    garybruce's avatar



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    De Bachmakov by The Different Company

    Tried a sample today and found the first hour incredibly crisp and invigorating - a wonderful mixture of green, citrus and "cold", building upon the usual note of freshness you get in ctirus. It evokes a bracing morning walk in the woods in late winter. During the middle notes the "cold" evaporates leaving the pine-citrus combination. It doesn't project much, and longevity was about 3-4 hours overall, but the smell is intoxicating throughout.

    18 December, 2010

    kpsunil's avatar



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    Égoïste / L'Égoïste by Chanel

    Smells like rotten fruit. Reminds me of various home made fruit juice (or "squash" as we used to call it) from my childhood in the East. Not something I want on my body!

    18 December, 2010

    bonzo's avatar

    Germany Germany

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    Bleu de Chanel by Chanel

    very simple, vulgar and ordinary interpretation of the " water" theme - trying to be as successful as cool water etc.but instead this is a huge deception.
    Jaccques Polge is a great parfumeur and he has done great works specially on the female side like allure , chance and antaeus on the male side but already allure pour homme was a huge disappointment not talking about edition blnache etc-even worse!
    If you think of Chanel with it´s great perfume history including henri roberts "pour monsieur" and " cristalle" , ernest beaux great works like " cuir de russie " , no.5, etc. then Bleu is one of the worst launches ever.Why isn´t it possible to create a really good perfume apart from the mainstream ? If it was produced to meet the market expectations and to increas the income of chanel then I´am convinced that this is not the right way! Specially from Chanel and Mr. Polge I expect a work on definitive higher level.Bleu is disgusting, cheap and boring.
    And be aware that even today perfumers like aurelien guichard do really great works as the reinterpretation of futur and baghari ........

    18 December, 2010

    The_Cologneist's avatar

    United States United States

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    Façonnable by Façonnable

    Sampled this at Marshall's.. the opening smells like fish food.

    18 December, 2010

    bluedogtenn's avatar



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    Nautica Classic by Nautica

    This plays on the olfactory senses quite like citrus cleaning products, which rather repulses me. I would say give this cologne the heave ho out of your wishlist or collection, me sadly but gratefully out of my collection. I should not have bought this stinky gift set, FYI! WARNING: DO NOT BUY!

    Overall: Two Stars
    Longevity: Three Stars
    Projection: Four Stars
    Intangibles: One Star

    Final Grade: D- for Don't ever get!

    18 December, 2010

    bhougland's avatar



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    Roadster by Cartier

    I am looking for a signature spring scent, something that doesn't smell like I just spritzed lemon all over myself. Well, I found a fragrance that smells like I bypassed the lemon for mint. Really, that is all I smell: mint, mint and more mint. I doesn't even smell like it is a cologne that is inspired by mint...it just smells like mint gum, and thats it! I want to love this cologne but it is horrible unless you really like mint, or really love the bottle.

    18 December, 2010

    bonzo's avatar

    Germany Germany

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    Allure Homme Sport by Chanel

    fresh, spicy light water.

    another very disappointing launch of the last years- mix whatever you find according to the needs of a market, throw it on the market with an excellent marketing campaign and make hopefully lots of money.

    unfortunately has it happened with lots of perfumes.....allure homme sport has nothing of an allure-what a silly name for a badly composed eau de toilette.

    this water smells as bad as the rest being thrown every year on the market and everything seems to be the same.....

    where are the great unique, outstanding perfumes ????
    okay they are gone........ernest beaux, daltroff, jean charles, henri almeras, henri robert, germaine cellier , bernard chant etc.- yes they were were the icons able to make perfumes you will never and ever forget ...........

    18 December, 2010

    bonzo's avatar

    Germany Germany

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    Boss Bottled Night by Hugo Boss

    nice bottle, good looking guy advertising, huge marketing campaign for a bad perfume.

    woody,aromatic fragrance- simple, cheap and very commercial.

    if you look for something outstanding, perfectly composed and unique- have a look at the perfumes of guerlain (habit rouge, vetiver, derby !)this is perfumery on a really high level!

    18 December, 2010

    bonzo's avatar

    Germany Germany

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    Cristalle Eau de Toilette by Chanel

    green floral chypre- very clear, fresh and spicy.

    perfect composition- individual, unique, special- outstanding perfectly composed by the great Henri Robert.

    very elegant, very french, very catherine deneuve- simply wonderful!

    everything perfectly put together : the name, the fragrance- an awsome composition for summer.

    18 December, 2010

    Joe_Frances's avatar

    United States United States

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    Mark Birley For Men Charles Street by Mark Birley

    Mark Birley for Men --Charles Street is a subtle-complex fragrance. For a fragrance to be both subtle and complex is hard to achieve, but Mark Birley Charles Street does it exceedingly well It starts off as a fairly dry, quasi-gourmand, fragrance devoid of sweetness. Some people have said that on the opening they smelled leather, or Scotch whisky. I find that funny in a way, because I get something that is awfully hard to describe, but the closest I can come to describing it is something like a "new tires" vibe, which stuns me as I have never smelled anything like it before, and I absolutely love it. Too bad the opening burst doesn't last all that long. Over time, MBCS becomes warmer, with a hint of sweetness. I wish I could detect the rose and lilly-of-the-valley that are said to be in the middle notes, but alas I don't. Such sweetness as there is in the development doesn't come across as floral to my nose. It is the amber or perhaps vanilla that add that tiny touch of sweetness. Like its Mark Birley precedent, it is not loud or "out there" in any way. It starts with some decent projection, but it seems to become more of a skin scent in due course. Don't think, however, that that means that no one but you can detect it. In fact it is there, but again it is subtle and alluring. Some may say that MBCS lacks longevity, but that is not true. It is just not loud, but others will let you know with a smile or a word that it is there. I do not detect the carrot seed element which I do smell and I don't particularly like in the original Birley. Not a power house fragrance, Charles St. is more a penthouse fragrance. Not totally modern exactly, but it is keeping up with the times. Self assured and elegantly low-keyed describe Charles Street best. Even a fragrance-phobe might like this. Not groundbreaking, nevertheless it bespeaks a very high degree of quality and savoir faire, and that's says a lot in my book.

    18 December, 2010 (Last Edited: 23 February, 2011)

    The_Cologneist's avatar

    United States United States

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    Story by Paul Smith

    I am totally revising my previous review in which I highly praised PS Story. While it isn't bad, it's not my favorite fresh vetiver scent. I feel fresh vetiver scents are hard to pull off, or maybe I just don't wanna smell it too often, as I think vetiver goes better with woods as opposed to citrus.

    Regardless.. Story is one of the better citrus/vetivers. It's fresh, grassy, oily. The smell reminds me of fresh cut grass, with oil poured over it. Yes, motor oil.. not so much gasoline. It's fresh, yet still a little dirty, which I think is what keeps my attention; while at the same time, I think that's why it's discontinued, because of some aroma's that may not please the average Joe's.

    In the realm of fresh and citrus vetivers, on the designer side, I think Story is my favorite. My biggest gripe is longevity and projection issues, as I usually only get about 4 hours with it. It does remind me of a more complex and less synthetic smelling version of He Wood (which smells like magic marker to me, it also reminds me of Creed Original Vetiver's dry down.

    Again, this isn't my favorite fresh vetiver. In fact, I think the whole genre of such isn't really my taste. Although if I had to pick 2 that are outstanding, they would be Bois Blonds, and Grey Vetiver. Both being a bit more pricey, and niche. I don't think Story is bottle worthy, simply because I don't have a purpose for this genre of scent in my collection. However, for designer's in this genre, I think it's the best one I've tried. I give this one a hesitant neutral rating, because of purpose, longevity, projection, and some minor flaws in craftsmanship, that affect my personal taste.

    18 December, 2010 (Last Edited: 18 February, 2012)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    A*Men / Angel Men by Thierry Mugler

    A*Men is saved from a thumbs-down by my own cautiousness. Not wanting to dog this fragrance for circumstances out of its control, I’m not giving the negative rating that I otherwise would have. The last time I wore A*Men, I applied it a half hour before launching into a 24-hour GI virus. The sensation of retching and the scent of A*Men are now gloriously bound in my nervous system. Oh, the irony of fusing a gourmand fragrance and gastric distress.

    But here’s what I thought pre-emesis: This is a gender bias on my own part, but there’s Angel (clever, quick and wonderfully badly-behaved) and there’s A*Men (a clod.) In trying to recalibrate the notes of Angel and sell it to the boys, Mugler fell prey to the mistake of all the Angel-imitators. It’s not the flavors, it’s the composition.

    There’s an irony to a 24 year-old woman wearing the short-skirted catholic schoolgirl look. The look carries its own slight misalignment that, despite relying on a conceptual pedophilia, is socially acceptable. It’s ‘good’ pervy because we stuff all the potential negatives into the large bag of justifications marked “fantasy” and allow ourselves feel the thrill but not the guilt. Take the above description and exchange man for woman. The vaguely askew but not socially line-crossing feel becomes invisible next to the social anathema of gender borrowing. Such a simple act triggers a fascinating, learned emotional response. The classic two male witness/audience reactions are: 1) stare, because something terrible is about to happen, or, 2) look the other way, because if you’re caught looking, you’re participating. #2 is probably the more common and more visceral response because of the inferred next step: if you’re looking, and he looks back and makes eye contact, by the rules of straight manhood, you have acknowledged him as your object of desire and are queer.

    It’s not the skirt; it’s the intention and the modulation of the reference. A*Men misses the point of Angel and looks to her list of ingredients, not her bad behavior, for inspiration.

    18 December, 2010 (Last Edited: 24 April, 2012)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Anthracite pour L'Homme by Jacomo

    What I get from Anthracite is a floral fougère with a bit of spicy fruit sweetness. Very nicely put-together, shows great evolution and has a coherent dry-down. I know that Luca Turin has referred to this as one of the artful late 80s-early 90s men’s fragrances that that were influential critically, but not commercial successes. Given the others similarly noted (Insensé, Heritage, Ténéré) I looked forward to trying Anthracite. While the florals here (mostly rose to me, but also something tropical, or is that the fruit?) are interesting for the fact that they eventually replace the lavender in the fougère accord, Anthracite falls into the category of harmonious fougères for me. I prefer starker, rougher fougères, so I don’t mean this as a compliment. When a fougère is blended to removed the sharp edges left by the collision of lavender and coumarin, it seems too restrained. Reserved in a way that might suit a chypre, but not a fougère .

    Scorecard
    Stark: Rive Gauche pour Homme, Azzaro pour Homme, Paco Rabanne pour Homme, PR Ténéré, and Caron's Troisième Homme (the last two stark despite their florals.)

    Harmonious: YSL Jazz, Drakkar Noir (loud, yes, but focused on blend) and Anthracite.

    I’ve left out Cool Water deliberately. Despite its identification as the iconic fresh, aromatic fougère, it just does’t seem like a fougère to my nose---its innovative water fruit vibe made it qualitatively something different from a fougère.

    So where does this leave Anthracite? It’s got some of the fruit that Cool Water has. It’s got a non-lavender floral, like Ténéré. In execution of the fougère accord, it’s a little meek like Jazz. In some ways it’s similar to Givenchy’s Xeryus, a floral with a healthy nod to the fougère. But Xeryus’s use of florals and coumarin is much ballsier than Anthracite.

    I could argue with myself here that Anthracite is in fact the best use of all the various elements I’ve mentioned above. It certainly is my bias that I want a rough ride from a fougère and I could just be blind to Anthracite’s charm. But both floral and fougère, Anthracite does seem cross-bred like a mule. Close enough for the parents to reproduce, but Anthracite is sterile and leaves us with no direct descendants. I guess I’m left undecided.

    18 December, 2010 (Last Edited: 03 May, 2012)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Baldessarini by Baldessarini

    I find Baldessarini linear. Disliking a linear fragrance is somehow worse than disliking a scent with a traditional top, middle and base. Whereas the three-tiered fragrance might surprise you and win you over, for a linear scent, the first sniff becomes the lasting impression. A linear fragrance must have notes that can connect at various points to keep your interest. It allows for reconsideration from different perspectives and in different lights. Here is where a good linear fragrance can hold its own against a known classic.

    In Baldessarini, I found the saccharine sweet note unpleasant, the nose equivalent of a high-pitched whistle. The cedar-like tobacco note has no connection to this sweet note, and so the two sit uneasily side by side for the duration of their mutually linear paths. Another difficulty with the tobacco note: a botanically derived material evolves over time. When it doesn’t, a ‘reference’ note must be used carefully. If it simulates tobacco, but is not tobacco, and the other components to the fragrance don’t enhance it, the nose may recoil, as mine did.

    18 December, 2010 (Last Edited: 03 May, 2012)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Zino Davidoff by Davidoff

    Review Zino

    With Zino, I felt for the longest time that I was missing something. I don’t find it interesting or appealing. To me it’s a bit of a stew. The balance is off. In particular there are too many other broad, rich notes (rosewood, sandalwood, amber, patchouli, vanilla) that are somehow reduced to a flat sweetness. The Guerlain-style trick of salting a vanillic amber with herbs really fails here. (Funny, then that Zino is often compared to Heritage, one of few Guerlain amber-oriental that doesn’t use the Guerlinade trick.) Whether it’s the sweet but flat backdrop, or simply the wrong rose I find the combination just uncomfortable. Perhaps this type of aromatic woody rose masculine just isn’t my bag. Zino reminds me a good bit of Ungaro III, another fragrance whose critical success evades me.

    Actually both Zino and Ungaro III bring home an important point for me. I may not like them myself, and what I buy and wear will be guided by my own pleasure. But critical discussion of perfume will involve our preferences as well as objectivity, analysis and imagination.

    18 December, 2010 (Last Edited: 03 May, 2012)

    odioustoilet's avatar

    Antarctica Antarctica

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    Hervé Léger Homme by Hervé Léger

    People are saying it smells like Terre D'Hermes, I don't care if it is an exact copy, it smells great and I got if for cheap.......$10!!

    I have a local Avon rep to thank for that, I have never owned an Hermes scent and have only taken a whiff of TdH at the Hermes shop at the local mall. I remember thinking what a great cologne! I just can't recall the exact notes to compare it to HL by/in association with Avon.

    The only bad: No projectivity at all! You really got to spray it on!

    19 December, 2010

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Aramis 900 by Aramis

    Aramis 900 and Clinique’s Aromatics Elixir are very similar. In classic Estée Lauder fashion, there are effectively masculine and feminine versions of one fragrance, as is also the case with JHL/Cinnabar, Devin/Alliage, Aramis/Azuree. The funny thing is, by conventional perfume standards they’re mixed up with A900 and Aromatics Elixir. While both are floral/herbal chypres, AE is much stronger and potentially off-putting, yet is the version sold to women. A900, the one for the boys, is sweeter, more floral and less stark. Overall, A900 is lighter on patchouli, and has more rose than AE. It has a generally softer tone.

    In Aramis 900, up top the bergomot is restrained in its bitterness by a soft lemon. Rosewood makes the rose seem sweet and liqueuer-like. The strong chamomile note, that reads as strictly bitter in AE’s opening notes, is replaced by an herbal quality in A900 that gives a bit of soapiness not found in AE. A900’s basenotes, which definitely include a healthy dose of patchouli (as in AE) are modulated by vetiver. Both scents end on a rose/patchouli accord, but the rose dominates in A900.

    I used to think, why wear, A900? Cut to the chase and wear AE. And while I do wear AE more often, I’ve grown very fond of A900. It’s very pretty and has a bit more smile to it than AE.

    I don’t usually think of EL as the company to turn gender norms upside-down, but in designating AE as the huge, take-it-or-leave-it bruiser, and A900 as the paler and quieter of the pair, Bernard Chant is giving us a functional instruction on gender in the Gemaine Cellier tradition: knock it out for the women and dilute it for the men. There’s a lesson here for us, boys.

    19 December, 2010

    scentsitivity's avatar

    United States United States

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    Oceane by L'Aromarine

    Cucumber, a touch of melon and a Coast soap oceanic accord, all on top of white florals. A fairly persistent, jumbled, synthetic feminine. Not to my liking.

    19 December, 2010

    SmellyNinja's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Summer Night by Canali

    If you've tried Canali Black Diamond or Canali Men, you basically know what you're in for. Each of these fragrances share not only a similar, pyramid shaped bottle (and incidentally, Summer Night has the most striking bottle of the group), but also the rich, soapy leather backdrop. In fact, if you look at the ingredient lists for each, they're pretty similar from top to bottom.

    Like a group of siblings, they all have their individual traits to go along with their commonalities. For its part, Summer Night is the younger, playful one of the bunch. With the pineapple and melon leading the way, it emphasizes its fruit tones while still maintaining an air of sophistication. It all comes together nicely into a mature, classy cocktail...letting people know that while you may appreciate the finer things, it doesn't mean you can't still have a bit of fun.

    19 December, 2010

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Havana by Aramis

    The re-released Gentleman’s Collection by Aramis is like a series of love letters from Estée Lauder to men. This line is top-notch and a spectacular synopsis of the history of Aramis. Other men’s fragrance lines should take note and be threatened.

    Havana is an instance of more being better. The complexity makes for richness without confusion. Some dissonance, yes. Enough to keep a feeling of complexity from top to drydown. Actually the dissonance up top is a glorious riot. You can tell it’s a woody fragrance, but aldehydes, camphor, grapefruit? Is that celery?

    Havana is also a great example of how the best Lauder perfumes can be well-considered nods to existing genres without simply being category-fillers meant to flesh out a line. Havana could be considered a fougère---there’s lavender and coumarin---but a bay rum fougère? A juniper fougère? A celery fougère? It also seems to have learned from the best of the men’s 80s powerhouse fragrances and is joyfully potent but not heavy.

    In two respects I’ll differ with most reviewers comments. I don’t get tobacco. Booze, yes. Tobacco, no. And while most seem to see Havana as a warm scent, to me it stays camphorously cool from start to finish. Wait. Maybe that’s it. Is menthol cigarette listed as one of the notes on the Aramis site?

    19 December, 2010

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Léonard de Léonard by Léonard

    This is another perfume I found on a Basenotes thread about underestimated fragrances current and past. Isn’t Basenotes fantastic?

    Leonard de Leonard is a fruity, green-floral chypre. And every time I think it’s a little too sweet for my taste, I get the purr of the leather and reconsider. This is an LOL chypre (light on leather.) Not usually my preference, but LdL uses its sweetness smartly. It’s not a counterpart to the admittedly light leather note. Rather, it matches the tone of the florals. Green plum-like notes gibe with the watery sweetness of the lily of the valley and hyacinth. The leather actually seems to fit with an unidentifiable spiciness that becomes, along with the leather, more noticeable yet oddly not any stronger in the drydown. This is the part that won me over. I feared LdL might be headed for a bad, sweet soapiness, but the leather and spice steer it away from soap and toward a lightly mossy chypre drydown.

    19 December, 2010

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