Fragrance Reviews from February 2010

    Showing 1 to 30 of 995.
    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Miss Dior Originale (previously Miss Dior) by Christian Dior


    THE CURRENT FORMULATION: The sage in the opening brings out an interesting sort of cover-up of the indole from the gardenia, but the indole lasts only a minute or two as does the sage, leaving a pleasant green galbanum in control. I often had problems with galbanum but in this case, it comes through beautifully. The galbanum morphs into a delicious floral heart accord featuring jasmine, rose, and bergamot, and here’s where I begin to pick up Miss Dior’s chypre nature – the soft, discreet oakmoss from the base shadows the excellent floral bouquet. It grows richer and richer, adding depth with labdanum and patchouli with the soft oakmoss coming to its full bloom. The current version of Miss Dior is a bit of a rarity: It’s a pretty fragrance that has real depth in its hidden recesses. But it has longevity problems on my skin.

    THE VINTAGE VERSION (thanks, ubuandibeme): After the sharp galbanum opening, the chypre nature of this earlier Miss Dior hits – complete with the leather that I didn’t smell in the current version. This opening carries an immediate leather note along with the bergamot and the oakmoss – I don’t get the gardenia and only a hint of indole hiding under the smooth leather. The rose and jasmine take their time (why hurry?) to show up under the leather chypreness and these aren’t the “pretty” florals that I expereinced in the current formulation… these florals are sensual and enticing in their quiet voluptuousness. This accord holds for hours as it gradually changes into a soft drydown of patchouli and labdanum with still a trace of oakmoss. This is a great scent and even the current version, though less intense and more modern, is a thumbs up.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Edwardian Bouquet by Floris


    Unisex, definitely. I find Edwardian Bouquet decidedly indolic. It presents a rich and smooth indolic jasmine with a refined galbanum for an excellent floral / green accord that is backgrounded by a clean mossy note. To my nose, the jasmine and possibly the lily overwhelm the other florals in the mixture causing me to question why this scent was named “bouquet” instead of “white floral,” but that’s just nomenclature. The complete accord of the opening, the white floral / galbanum heart, and the clean mossy background give off a chypre feeling to me – one that makes me luxuriate in its power and sensuality. I lose the moss in the base and get a rich but discreet woody / amber drydown that lasts for an impressive length of time. Edwardian Bouquet is another winning scent from Floris and likely will be my fourth purchase from this excellent company. I love Edwardian Bouquet’s classicism and its elegant, chypre nature. …Moderate to strong sillage and lasts forever.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Fidji by Guy Laroche


    A beautiful fragrance… a classic and discreet green floral. It opens fresh and clean with bergamot, hyacinth, and light citrus. In the background I get a soft rose and jasmine that rounds out the floral character. Some slight spices and the florals continue building the heart notes. The pyramid says clove for spice, but I find it hard to believe that clove could be this sheer… The powdery base presents patchouli, amber, and musk in a soft and sweet accord. Delicate sillage and near enough longevity …totally lovely.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Birmane by Van Cleef & Arpels


    A fruity opening that I can actually enjoy… It’s pleasant and perhaps a bit more floral than fruity, but the probable reason I enjoy it is that the opening has rosewood and I’m a sucker for rosewood. It’s a beautiful opening and one that is unique – at least I haven’t smelled many like it. The middle accord presents a refined floral accord. I particularly enjoy that the heliotrope comes through quite clearly and heliotrope is my favorite of the floral notes offered. I get a bit of powder from the orris in the heart’s background, and that adds a sensuality to the florals. Birmane is listed as an Oriental – Woody… the “Oriental” I understand but I don’t get much of a wood emphasis, not even in the base that lists sandalwood. What I get is primarily vanilla, tonka, and musk... and this accord, in particular, presents that aspect of the fragrance that Takemyhusbandplz points out: It comes across well when smelled away from the skin but is rather too bland when smelled closely. Birmane is a charmingly feminine fragrance with soft sillage and good longevity.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Scuderia Ferrari Black by Ferrari


    Metallically synthetic, and not in the most pleasant way. Ferrari Black is pretty typical of the automobile fragrances – unoriginal, fruity, sweet, and featuring a strong vanilla / amber drydown that somehow is short of lasting ability. But it’s certainly not the worst one of its sort, and it probably won’t be the last of its kind, either.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Fire & Ice for Men by Revlon


    Not bad at all… It’s a bit green, ambery, fruity… a bit synthetic but not disagreeably so. It’s quite powdery, and I think Russlan’s right… there’s even a little bit of osmanthus in there.

    What I really enjoy about Fire & Ice is that it has some uniqueness to it: It’s not generic / synthetic like so many of the designer fragrances of recent vintage. Its synthetic feel is acceptable... enjoyable even. It gives off a pleasant sillage. If money is a consideration, this one merits a tryout.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    MCM Success by MCM

    Quite a unique tobacco opening with a very strong, very tenacious honey note. The honey certainly adds an interesting perspective to the citrus / tobacco / florals of the opening and heart: I enjoy the combination, and am reminded of Miel de Bois because of the powerful honey note. The opening has an excellent longevity. When the heart notes eventually do come along, the uniqueness continues. The lightwoods of patchouli and vetiver combine first with the middle’s abundant florals and then morph to a soon-to-be-prominent cedar note, all the while the honey is prominent and retains a firm relationship with the tobacco. I don’t get a very strong drydown. The honey and tobacco remain and there’s an amber and a leather that show up, but the whole accord doesn’t seem strong to me.

    The first time I wore MCM Success, I got a balanced tobacco, leather, and honey accord. After that the honey has dominated each wearing. With its honey dominance it’s still an ok scent but I prefer the balance of the first times I tested it.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Versailles pour Homme by Jean Desprez


    This is a fragrance that probably should not be smelled close to the skin… Its special beauty is in its sillage. Close sniffing gives primarily a massively amalgamated accord that is substantially linear, and, likely, to most of the younger generation and even many of the older generation, extremely off-putting. Versailles Pour Homme is a rich, spicy, resinous, and grossly animalic complexity, but its complexity is not in its traditional movement or level-to-level development. Its complexity is accomplished in its sillage that richly sends out its captivating essences in various wafts of spice, wood, resin, jasmine, greens, amber, leather and musk.

    For those who love this kind of olfactory art form, Versailles Pour Homme could well be the art form's supreme masculine expression. It’s a fragrance only for those who understand and value that distinct animalic masculinity that is often called “outdated.” As for me... I have to award it a thumbs up - but only for its audacity. In actuality, it frightens me... Strong sillage and unreal longevity.

    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Intuition for Men by Estée Lauder


    This is the most uninteresting, unremarkable fragrance I’ve tried in a long time. My first impression is that it is synthetic – not hugely synthetic… just err… blah synthetic. Then it’s generic but not grossly generic, just “Hmmm… I can’t think of a more suitable word than ‘generic.’” It’s sort of aquatic, I guess, and it has some cedar in the heart notes. It’s not sweet and it’s not not-sweet. It’s supposed to have a resinous drydown. I don’t get any drydown at all. Intuition has weak sillage and unimpressive longevity. Totally forgettable.

    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Loukhoum by Keiko Mecheri


    I’ve tested about four or five fragrances based on the Turkish delight concept, and in my mind, this one is unquestionably the best. Keiko Mecheri’s Loukhoum doesn’t go over the top with gooey sweetness, nor does it get unbalanced in its handling of its several dynamic floral and fruit notes. Loukhoum presents its refined rose / honey / almond accord in a way that features the sweetness and lusciousness, but with the perfect timbre for wearing as a fragrance. The musks, woods, and vanilla of the base are beautifully presented, discreet, and long lasting. I love this one.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Gigli Man by Romeo Gigli


    Romeo Gigli Man is another very good product from a designer who has produced some notably good scents. RGM opens with an interesting spicy / citrus accord that keeps its well-balanced nature quietly and competently. For spice I get a soft, sort-of-nutmeg note that I find is more enjoyable than a true nutmeg note. The bamboo and the hiba wood in the middle and base work beautifully: They present a slightly exotic feeling to complete the comfortable, casual, discreet feeling of the fragrance. I enjoy this one very much and it’s a steal at the prices they are charging.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Bois et Fruits by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido


    A compilation by Sheldrake of a couple of his other creations… Yes, it does remind me of Feminite du Bois and a little of Arabie. It’s quieter and softer than Feminite du Bois. It’s not as radical as either, but, reminiscent or not, it does have its own character as well as the character of a Luten’s fragrance. Bois Et Fruits is fruity, but not the fresh, juicy fruity... rather the dried fruits of Arabie. It’s woods stand out more than in both of its Sheldrake progenitors. The top and middle notes are primarily a dried fruity presentation similar to Arabie but without the abundant spices or the abundant abundance. The woodnotes are smooth and rich but for a long time remain in the background of the fruit accord. When the cedar does come forward, it is quite diminutive, and the end is near. I find Bois Et Fruits a highly enjoyable scent while it lasts, but it is way too short on longevity on my skin… Too bad for its poor longevity, it would have been a sure purchase if it had lasted longer on my skin.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Ferrari Passion by Ferrari


    Passion? I don’t think so. To be honest, I’m not a fan of that citrus / lavender opening accord that is so prominent in so many of the mass marketed fragrances. It’s too ‘90s. This is a typical generic, synthetic concoction. I get metallic… probably the combination of the lavender and the cedar… and it certainly isn’t one of your better metallic notes. The drydown, too, is uninspired and persistently sub par.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    DKNY Red Delicious Men by Donna Karan


    The apple, the coffee, and the extensive list of liquors don’t come through for me. About all I get are some screechy synthetic notes that do not bare a resemblance to any smell I know of in the natural world or the virtual world for that matter. Sillage is poor and longevity is poorer. Not a very good scent IMO.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Aramis Always Him by Aramis


    I get an Acqua di Gio opening with cucumber and lime served on the side. I didn’t like it at first but after a few wearings, it’s growing on me. I also enjoy is the minty middle notes: Acqua di Gio has turned into Live Jazz – two fragrances in one – what a deal! With the base the cedarwood comes through the most dominant for me, followed by the vetiver and then amber – it’s not a sweet base, and it carries the fresh, clean feeling of the top and middle levels. I never thought I’d like this one, but it turns out to be rather interesting: An Acqua di Gio clone that is better… more complex… than the original AdG.

    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Steam Aoud by Montale


    All I get is aoud – Montale aoud... no rose, no amber, no caraway… Nada. So I guess it comes down to whether or not I consider a straight aoud note to be good enough to satisfy my definition of a worthy niche fragrance. It doesn’t. All I can catch from this fragrance, is a straight-forward aoud note… nothing exciting...

    Steam Aoud has a definite sillage, and it lasts a long, long, long time. As Montale aoud notes go, it’s a typical enough but certainly not at all compelling.

    01st February, 2010 (Last Edited: 02 February, 2010)

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Tobacco Mucho by Stéphanie de Saint-Aignan


    Except for the first time I tested this, I have not gotten a tobacco note. The first time, it opened up with a quiet tobacco that lasted only five or ten minutes; then it went to a wood accord with the gaïac wood predominating over vetiver. Every test after that has brought an opening that featured a strong, bitter smoky note much like birch tar. The birch tar smokiness now continues to dominate the whole fragrance to my nose and the pleasant aoud / vetiver accord that I smelled the first time I tested it has never shown up again. So my judgment is that there is way too much tar for me in this fragrance, even though the tar does not project strongly. If you can get along with birch tar, this might be a good fragrance… me… no.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Fleur d'Oranger 27 by Le Labo


    I’m not sure what the idea behind this fragrance is… It’s a simple, dry, clear floral / green accord. It doesn’t smell like orange blossom and there’s a streak of clean green running through it that seems to confuse or disguise the floral notes to my nose… I just can’t identify the floral. At times the simple, clear, pristine, straight-forword scents can be incredibly beautiful, but this isn’t a scent like that – it isn’t pristine or delicate or at all captivating. I agree that it seems like a household cleaning product.

    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Bergamote 22 by Le Labo


    The opening smells richer than many bergamot openings... prominent in this one are a firm, clear (tingly) petit grain note and a tart grapefruit note which together add a broad dimension to the high quality bergamot: It’s an excellent opening. I don’t seem to pick up any heart notes, which doesn’t surprise me in a fragrance named for probably the supreme opening note. The opening lasts a long time, which is good, and gradually morphs into a vetiver / cedar with a strong background of floral – orange blossom (appropriately) in particular. It’s brilliant… It presents such a clean, clear, distinctly sophisticated version of bergamot… this one certainly is an exemplar of the artistic use of this note. The bergamot in Bergamote 22 is particularly well presented.


    01st February, 2010 (Last Edited: 02 February, 2010)

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Vetiver 46 by Le Labo


    The opening presents a strong smoky note – I would say that the smoke is caused by a combination of the incense and cedar oil... if vetiver is a part of the smoke, it’s wearing an entirely unfamiliar face in this version of itself. It’s a persistent smoke and it dominates to my nose for several minutes until I start detecting a bit of sweetness with a touch of a dry but not harsh vetiver note. The vetiver note is more recessive than not… It is neither the wild, raw green vetiver nor a delicate vetiver... it lies somewhere in between and it comes across as sweet. One thing I like about the vetiver is that it isn’t cut with citrus as too often happens, but the lack of citrus is irrelevant because the vetiver note is extremely short lived to my nose.

    The smoky note stays around for the entire run of the fragrance, while the fragrance plays with presenting hits and misses of spice notes such as pepper and cloves grounded by a hint of gaïac wood and / or labdanum. I don’t appreciate this fragrance to any great extent; it doesn’t come on to my nose either very forcefully or very interestingly.

    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Jasmin Full by Montale


    Jasmin Full opens with a strong, clear, floral accord with a potent green streak. I’m not sure how much of the floral accord is jasmine and how much is honeysuckle or orange blossom… I think it’s possible that the jasmine dominates, but however much, it is the aromatically clean, non-indole jasmine… It’s pretty and quite strong at first, but it’s also a bit unchallenging as floral accords go. Yes, I can see this as a fragrance that would do for a casual everyday choice, because it’s the kind of fragrance a person could scarcely go wrong wearing.

    I think that (worn lightly) it would make a good office fragrance exactly because It IS pretty and fresh and green and uncomplicated… It does “pretty” very nicely, but “pretty” is only superficial: It needs a soul…


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    99 Regent Street by Hugh Parsons


    If you love violet, this one’s for you. I find the violet notes in 99 Regent Street completely overwhelming to the exclusion of the other, more desirable, notes. I dislike the synthetic violet note that is included in so many of these fragrances now days – I’m talking unconditional hatred for several of them. If you, like me, dislike the synthetic violet notes of modern perfumery, forget about 99, Regent Street… it’s as violently violet as Grey Flannel.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Gendarme Sky by Gendarme


    Strong… too strong and not very original. Gendarme Sky opens very perfumy-citrusy; it smells to me like an inexpensive should-have-been-forgotton fragrance from the past. The floral element of the middle (magnolia? Can’t really tell… too perfumy.) is also quite strong and a lot more discretion would be advised. The dry down is woody and mossy and perfumy. It’s nice if you want to be Mr. Cologne guy, but I’ll pass.


    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Cadjméré 18 by Parfumerie Generale


    This is one of those fragrances that I simply couldn’t understand the first time I tested it… I was a total blank. So, as is my habit, I put the sample tube back in limbo part of the sample drawer and went on with my life. Months later at my second testing the word “coconut” popped into my brain when I sniffed it. What I smelled was the hard, dusky-almost-dusty, shaggy/woody surface of a coconut after its fleshier exterior had been removed… just a little of the coconut meat/milk aroma came through, just enough to allow me to think that I might be smelling coconut palm wood (of which I have no idea of the smell). The woody dominant coconut accord was nice, but not intriguing in the least. The next testing gave me the rosewood that I had been seeking out combined with a amber/wood like scent that I assume is ambrette seed. There was also a bit of resinousness involved, but I just didn’t find anything exciting about the fragrance. I was bored with the whole idea of it until I realized that I had been getting it all wrong: I suddenly realized that this is a scent that I could easily live with: This is a dusky/woody, semi-resinous, semi-sweet, masculine-enough fragrance that is assertive without calling attention to itself. It exists as a comfortable fruity/woody background abstractness that, sprayed lightly, gives off an air of mystery without really giving its presence away. Off my skin I don’t get sweet and I don’t get gourmand. I get a woody dominant slightly coconuty background abstractness. Cadjmere has a firm sillage and a good enough longevity… I wear it with an extremely light application and I quite enjoy it that way.


    01st February, 2010 (Last Edited: 02 February, 2010)

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Aomassaï 10 by Parfumerie Generale


    Sweet carmel but not the icky sweet caramel… this one is sophisticated and adult. One way it is more adult is that it is presented with toasted hazelnuts, for a burned effect that reduces the sweet aroma of caramel. Underneath caramel and smoky hazelnut accord, I get the licorice whose obscure sweetness forms an agreeable tension with the caramel. I like this conflict very much... it adds its tension to the opening accord to make it so much more intriguing than the several cloyingly sweet interpretation of these elements that I’ve tested. The movement from the opening to the middle and base is quite slow and this lethargy shows the smoothness of this fragrance’s strong, unique notes. The drydown is excellent. It’s a dry, aromatic (resinous, even) wood accord that is everything a wood lover like me can ask for… I can identify the wenge wood, the vetiver, the incense, the dried grass and certainly the resins: everything I love… Identify them but I feel the drydown could be stronger; if fact, I find the whole fragrance rather too discreet. Aomassai contains beautiful and captivating accords and I would like them to show off a little more than they do… and they could last a little longer than they do.

    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Unforgivable Black by Sean John


    The lavender note used is not a quality lavender, and it detracts from the citrus and fruit of the opening accord. Eventually the accord settles down to a very nice combination and stays as a pleasant but uninspired opening. I’m not fooled by the calming down of the lavender because poor lavender always returns to get its revenge. By the time the fragrance softens to the middle light herbal accord, the fragrance has permanently set its character as a soft, pleasant, uncreative fragrance that probably won’t have much of a dry down because that’s what most fragrances like this do. ... I don’t get much of a drydown except that disagreeable trace of leftover cheap lavender…

    01st February, 2010

    foetidus's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Louanges Profanes 19 by Parfumerie Generale


    Interesting opening – a floral accord that seems almost bubble-gummy sweet, but there is something about the accord that holds my interest instead of my seeing it become a cliché. I think that what keeps the accord interesting is the (comparatively) heavy lily note in the mixture that dominates but in no way overcomes the lighter, more delicate, neroli and hawthorn notes… It’s a unique accord that, as Vibert says, gets dangerously close to being a disaster… but it never closes that last inch. I seem to miss a lot that is supposed to be going on in Louanges: The lily note, though prominent, does not come across to me as indole laden, and I don’t get an incense note unless that slight smoke in the background counts as such. Louanges stays rather linear in its excellent floral accord, and that accord continues into and through the drydown where the florals get a bit sweeter and unite themselves with a modicum of resinous wood note. The delicacy and artistry of the structure and movement is exceptional.

    Louanges Profanes 19 is an endearing classical floral fragrance, done exceptionally well with enough edginess to remove it far from the “pretty” category and place it in the “has a strong element of depth and complexity” category. It’s lovely and memorable.


    01st February, 2010

    hirch_duckfinder's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Incensi by Lorenzo Villoresi

    Different from many other incense fragrances, this is not about top-note shimmering frankincense oil but instead a deep, resinous, woody accord of various balsams including frankincense, myrrh, benzoin and more.

    Incensi opens with LV's signature rosewood/herbal top accord, supported by a little sweet ambery labdanum. Out of this a rich incense unfurls. The balance here is perfect, like a smokeless effect of the best burning brazier. It is powerful but not overwhelming like a middle-distance view of a large snow capped mountain.

    Some spices add continuity through the heart but incensi is dominated top to bottom by resins and tree notes.

    A very subtle and excellent creation, I find the incense is very prominent and potent. Refreshing, uplifting, balanced, grounding. This has it all.

    I could wear it every day.

    01st February, 2010

    odysseusm's avatar

    Canada Canada

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Hanami by Ayala Moriel

    This is an intriguing scent. Attention vanilla fans (female and male) -- this is something you want to check out! I am not a vanilla fan, so this scent can only take me so far. However, I can recognize the marvelous artistry here.
    The scent was part of a poetry project, in which perfumers were given the task to create a scent to evoke the vivid imagery of Ezra Pound's minimalist poem "In a Station of the Metro"
    The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
    Petals on a wet, black bough.

    Ayala categorizes this as a "wet woody-floral" and it is exactly that.
    It opens with haunting and piercing floral notes, and very woody vanilla. So far the scent is powerful but not particularly sweet. It is very woody, yet it has a translucent, sheer quality. Grassy vetiver adds to the mix. Gradually the tuberose and attar become more prominent, and these add an exotic, other-worldly quality. The dry down gets much more sweet, and the vanilla reappears.
    Vanilla isn't my particular sort of note. However, I give this a good rating due to the care and creativity here. I'm sure that vanilla fans will love this!

    01st February, 2010

    Sugandaraja's avatar

    Canada Canada

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Cèdre by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    Cedre isn't awful to my nose, but it really isn't anything noteworthy, either, especially given its price and numerous superior renditions of the tuberose flower ( some by the very same house! )

    Poison infamously has a grape crush note, but Sheldrake has paired his jasmine and tuberose with something even sweeter - bubblegum! Yes, bright, simplistic versions of these two flowers feel sandwiched between a pack of Juicy Fruit and the more usual pink stuff. This isn't at all the limpid naturalism of fragrances like Carnal Flower or Lutens' own A La Nuit, but perhaps a close cousin of Michael Kors for women with the sweetness turned on high.

    In the drydown, some of the token cedar does show up - a hint of Lutens' Bois accord, candied yet still smelling a little lost among the hot-pink neon sweetness.

    When I picture the wearer of this fragrance, I picture a woman raised on this generation of fruity-florals, seeking something more upscale, yet gravitating to more or less the same thing she knows from thousands of better-priced fragrances.

    She'd be better off saving her money and going with what she already knows.

    01st February, 2010

    Showing 1 to 30 of 995.