Fragrance Reviews from May 2011

    Showing 841 to 870 of 904.
    Rietha's avatar



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    Nahéma by Guerlain

    Is Nahéma still (again) available in South Africa? I have not seen advertisements in decades, literally, and was told some 20 - 25 yrs ago that it was not on the market any more. Tragically.
    When I tried it the first time, I got the impression of earth, raw earthy soil with earthen leaves in late autumn. I was thrilled by the unspoiled wood-and- leaves-in-rainwet-soil- sensation of that fragrance. And then came the roses, as soft as dew, lasting forever, nearly.
    Nahéma was my wedding perfume, and I would always be a bride while wearing that.

    30th May, 2011

    Swanky's avatar

    United States United States

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    1818 by Brooks Brothers

    1818 appears at first glance to be of the big and bold spice school populated by Obsession, Third Man, Santa Fe and their ilk. On a scent strip, it is loud and forceful and the boozy spice roars. Once on skin, however, it is far less stomping and for those who are turned off by the high volume of these fragrances this is probably a positive. 1818 is quite wearable especially in cooler climes due to this relative tranquility.

    Usually only a couple of sprays will produce potent sillage with this genre, but one needs a few more with Brooks Brothers' 1818. That's okay, because the bottle is 6 ounces and for about $55, that's a bargain.

    Fans of the spice bombs Santos, New York and the aforementioned trio will want to head to a Brooks Brothers outlet and test drive the near-luxury 1818 EDT.

    30th May, 2011

    cello's avatar

    United States United States

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    Lacoste pour Femme by Lacoste

    Lacoste pour Femme is a soft scent throughout it's short duration. A soft peppery opening transitions into gentle white flowers. The soft theme continues into the base, which is woods with a bit of incense.

    This is a perfectly acceptable fragrance, and would be considered safe for most occasions. It is pretty and inoffensive. But in the end, that is exactly what gives it a neutral rating from me.

    30th May, 2011

    calnadur's avatar

    Switzerland Switzerland

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    Allure Homme by Chanel

    The citron here seems to have overriding power on my skin, it just won't change
    or develop much. Unlike many reviewers here, I don't seem to smell the peppery notes I was so much looking forward to..

    Only in the end does this sweeten a tiny bit, but still, this is a pretty basic citrusy scent to me..I'm afraid I expected something more from Chanel though..

    30th May, 2011

    Aredore's avatar

    United States United States

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    Lovely by Sarah Jessica Parker

    I want to like this fragrance. I really, really do. Unfortunately, this is one scent where it's appeal to Mr. Turin will forever go over my head, as I simply can't smell it. I get white flowers and then nothing. Light, airy, instant vanishment.

    30th May, 2011

    Aredore's avatar

    United States United States

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    Tommy Hilfiger Dreaming by Tommy Hilfiger

    Should be called "Tommy Hilfiger Metallic Peaches." I smell no legible florals, simply strange, syrupy quicksilver peaches dripping off the crook of my arm. I like it, but not enough to purchase it. Peach is a lovely scent that blends nicely with human skin. Silage is low and longevity is average to good. Would make an excellent gift for a young girl.

    30th May, 2011

    Aredore's avatar

    United States United States

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    Anaïs Anaïs by Cacharel

    A white, spicy carnation that is perhaps a tad too spare, sour and powdery to pass with today's girls, despite it's pleasant, soapy realism. I have a scent memory connecting Anais Anais to my pediatricians office when I was barely four years old. It bears the same scrubbed and sterile aesthetic, without being unpleasant.

    30th May, 2011

    Redbeard's avatar

    United States United States

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    Florida Water by Murray & Lanman

    This little $4 fragrance is quite the chameleon. Right out of the bottle, or immediately upon splashing, it has the fizzy sour lemondrop aura of Caswell Massey #6, which I'm frankly not too thrilled about. Soon, a lot of orange peel begins to creep in, and those initial notes start to fade after a few minutes. Cinnamon and some other spices also start to appear, but more slowly. The middle is thus chiefly orange, with receding fizz and growing cinnamon. Just a few more minutes, and we're left with mostly just the cinnamon. Because of its lightness, and the idea of it as an alternative to an Eau de Cologne, I would use it in summer even though the base is effectively a spicy fall/winter scent. I don't think I've ever seen so much evolution in such a bargain basement fragrance.

    30th May, 2011

    Redbeard's avatar

    United States United States

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    Prada Amber pour Homme by Prada

    Very synthetic and strange. Opens with a candied windex vibe that I'd argue is very unisex (sometimes a hard thing to achieve, so I repsect that!). It should burn, or it should be too chemical, but it doesn't until later, which is even stranger. There's a little spice and a little violet (?), but it's just unendingly sweet, with a little of that devilish note that I always interpret as cherry. And as usual, the amber sweetness is shrill and piercing, like honey on steroids, and this undoes the breeziness that I suspect the other notes are trying to impart (they remind me of Sure Original Scent antiperspirant). I find it only indirectly soapy, in the way that Geir's cherry is soapy, or that Richard James' heavy men's room florals are soapy. The base is a bit more woody, but with a medicinal cherry wood like M7. Ultimately, though, rather than using soap that smells like this, I'd more likely go get some Sure and some Geir. I've graduated from this type of fragrance.

    30th May, 2011

    shamu1's avatar

    United States United States

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    Cabochard by Grès

    I have good news and bad news about the new formulation of Cabochard. First, here's the bad news. Much ado has been made about Cabochard's formula having been changed, and the consensus it that it's for the worse. I have never smelled any earlier versions of this, but based on what I'm smelling now, I can understand the disappointment. Cabochard was legendary, and was apparently a very rich, luxurious and complex scent. What I'm smelling now is anything but. It's simply a bare, stripped-down light leather scent, with no complexity at all. It's not terrible by any stretch, but certainly not the stuff of legends. It's boring.

    The good news is that Cabochard now is an excellent fragrance for any man or woman looking to explore what leather fragrances are like for the first time. This is a pure leather scent, and nothing else. It's a light, buttery smelling leather, and it will give any newcomer a good taste for the leather genre. It smells good too. I wouldn't wear it because it's just too simple and linear for my taste, but this does smell good, and you may get a lot of compliments wearing this. Cabochard is totally wearable by either a woman or a man.

    MY RATING: 6/10

    30th May, 2011

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Insolence Eau de Toilette by Guerlain

    Insolence varies from EDT to EDP concentrations. I can see the olfactory similarities and differences, but the ideas that they suggest, the references they make are where they differ chiefly. I’ve read that Insolence is Maurice Roucel’s paean to Après l’Ondée (1906--a perfume I’ve never smelled) but I take Luca Turin’s point that Insolence EDT lobs a number of l’Heure Bleue’s (1912) accords at you at various times in the fragrance's evolution. It’s as if l’Heure Bleue is being quoted or at least closely paraphrased. I enjoy this. It’s clever. Subtract these quoted bits, though, and the whole fragrance seems quite a bit less like a reflection on l’Heure Bleue. The bits ARE the reference.

    Contrary to the naysayers, I love the opening notes of Insolence EDT. They’re like a warning.

    Insolence EDP is substantively different from the EDT and doesn’t sing the l’Heure Bleue jingles that the EDT does. I see Insolence EDP as l’Heure Bleue reincarnated in the 21st century. I’ve read Après l’Ondée referred to as wan, but I’ve seen l’Heure Bleue called melancholic. I love l’Heure Bleue. It’s probably my favorite of the classic Guerlains, besting Jicky, Vol de Nuit and even Mitsouko. Though I wear it often, it best suits my darker hours. I can’t describe how L’Heure Bleue embodies a state of melancholy. Maybe it’s my Irish heritage showing through and I simply tune into it.

    It’s a great term, melancholy, but a bit anachronistic. ‘Black bile’ and all. Insolence EDP was born into the era of neurotransmitter insufficiencies and psychopharmacology. EDP is l’Heure Bleue with the benefit of an SSRI and an atypical antidepressant on board. A bit less romantic, I’ll admit, but here we are.

    The EDP seems a more studied reflection on l’Heure Bleue that the EDT is. Seen as family, the EDT might have her ancestor's eyes, but EDP and l’Heure Bleue are like siblings born into different eras. Insolence EDP and l’Heure Bleue both are reflections on orange blossom and violet and both play with olfactory chiaroscuro. Each underpins the florals with a vanillic amber, but where l’Heure Bleue uses a clovelike carnation to pull things toward despondency, Insolence EDP uses a raspberry/tonka combination that gives it a warm, easy laugh.

    30th May, 2011 (Last Edited: 31st May, 2011)

    crystal_disco's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    A*Men / Angel Men by Thierry Mugler

    I love this. I always get compliements on wearing it and it reminds me of Christmas, which was when I got it.
    I love the creamy chocolate notes that linger for ages and the bittersweetness of the coffee accents.
    I like the bottle, and I have never had a problem with the pump and the rubber case. I do have a habit of tugging at the rubber pionts on the star outline though.....

    I would thoroughly recommend this fragrance to anyone who likes anything that is not overtly strong in any obvious wasy, It isn't too woody, too citrusy, etc.


    30th May, 2011 (Last Edited: 31st May, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Domenico Caraceni 1913 by Domenico Caraceni

    Dull in a loud, dapper, masculine sort of way. Nicely put-together, though, and dries down to a soapiness more comfortable than its blustery start.

    Essentially, Fleur du Male for fancy straight guys.

    30th May, 2011 (Last Edited: 02 June, 2011)

    Mike's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Vétiver by Creed

    This is definitely one of the most 'off the beaten path' Creeds (in the sense that very few people own it or discuss it), but make no mistake...Vetiver is one of the most versatile, masculine, classic, and refined of all Creeds. In my opinion, it is not as soapy as the much newer Original Vetiver, and definitely this one is a different fragrance altogether. While the popular Original Vetiver is a very green-oriented fragrance, this Vetiver is much less green, but extremely well-blended and rounded. Perhaps more interestingly, it is firmly rooted in the style of a mossy/chypre fragrance, although from the listed notes this may come as a surprise. As others have mentioned, neither of Creed's vetiver fragrances are heavily reliant on the ingredient of vetiver itself. This makes the names somewhat misleading. Nonetheless, this is a wonderfully clean and uplifting scent, with a barbershop-esque quality to it. It hearkens back to a time long past, and it is certainly one of the most versatile Creeds in terms of the number of different occasions it could be utilized for. In fact, it could be argued that this Vetiver ties with GIT as being perhaps the most versatile of all Creeds. Never overbearing, and classically debonair in a subtle and unassuming way. It is no wonder that this was a favorite of JFK!

    30th May, 2011 (Last Edited: 05 June, 2011)

    Mike's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Baie de Genièvre by Creed

    For those who love the House of Creed, but dislike the current and somewhat formulaic trend of a lot of the Millesimes (codeword 'fresh'), this fragrance should do wonders! Indeed, Baie de Genievre is firmly entrenched in the 'old Creed' period, if we might term it as such. And as a result, it is composed in the somewhat astringently eccentric style of the older Creeds, aka the Eau de Toilette range. Whenever I try to describe this fragrance to someone, I often say that it is a cross between its predecessor Epicea and its successor Bois du Portugal, in that all three share a similarly distinct woody and spicy character. However, Baie de Genievre differs from Epicea in that it lacks the overarching pine note of Epicea. It is similar to Epicea by way of its use of spices (clove in particular), and the coniferously-tinged aroma of the titular juniper berry found within also makes it similar to Epicea's pine-dominant aroma. It is similar to Bois du Portugal because of its Old World masculine qualities and strong personality, though it is different because I find Baie de Genievre to exhibit more of a sweetness and a slightly more 'earthy' quality than BdP. I wholeheartedly agree with others on here who say that Baie de Genievre is one of the most underrated Creeds. Its spicy and somewhat barbershop-esque character speak volumes to those who afford it the time, and provide a somewhat nostalgic retreat to an era long past. Very different from the modern Millesimes, but much more rewarding than them in many aspects (as Acier Aluminium, Epicea, Vetiver, and company are).

    30th May, 2011 (Last Edited: 05 June, 2011)

    the_good_life's avatar

    Germany Germany

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    Eau du Sud by Annick Goutal

    Eau du Sud is a beautiful, old-fashioned aromatic citrus for which Goutal took more than just a few cues from Detaille's Aeroplane. In fact, I'd call this outright plagiarism, for Aeroplane is an aromatic citrus based on lemon, petigrain, bergamot, basil, mint, oakmoss and patchouli. While the notes given for Eau du Sud are slightly different, the end result is quite similar: a lovely citrus complex deepened by basil and mint notes, which give it a bit of green dirt and lead on to a classy chypre finish. I'm also in the camp which greatly favors this over the lemon cleaner intensity of Hadrien. It's the early twentieth century French Riviera in a bottle, sartorial refinement promenading ocean boulevards, white yachts under a perfect blue sky, picknicks in the chirping buzzing summer garrigue, lawn tennis and lemon trees.

    30th May, 2011 (Last Edited: 06 June, 2011)

    Aredore's avatar

    United States United States

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    Nina (new) by Nina Ricci

    A gourmand fruity floral that smells good? What is this nonsense? Nina Ricci Nina 2006 I guess. It's mainly this lovely apple blossom and burnt caramel scent accented by light candied citruses and a super-clean musk. Turns out, I smell this everywhere. It's not too sweet or cloying or musky - it seems to agree with everyone - and yet it has a definitive character as a fragrance, a feat in itself in this bloated fragrance category. It's optimistic and sweet and without being stupid.

    Not something I would wear, but it is something I would recommend. Perfect for teenage girls and anyone trying to feel like one.

    30th May, 2011 (Last Edited: 08 June, 2011)

    calnadur's avatar

    Switzerland Switzerland

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    Bulgari Black by Bulgari

    Hard for me to find the words to describe this..for one reason:

    this is simple and pure work of art and art is better enjoyed than described.

    A true masterpiece.

    30th May, 2011 (Last Edited: 12 June, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Private Collection - Cuir d'Iris by Parfumerie Generale

    CUIR D’IRIS AND A PLEA TO PERFUME PRODIUCERS

    Perfume evokes. It doesn’t recreate nature and it doesn’t tell stories. Successful perfumery creates richness and a complexity that allows for many possibilities, for varied experiences among wearers.

    At the center of Parfumerie Generale’s Cuir d’Iris is an active imbalance, a contest. From start to finish there’s never a blend or compromise. The oil and the water never quite mix. I’m not speaking about the notes, iris and leather, but the forces that motivate this perfume. Together the potent tannic quality of the leather and the forceful, make-up feel of the iris give the scent a playful cruelty that simultaneously draws me in and keeps me at arms-length. Cuir d’Iris implies the savage civility of a kempt, bourgeoise western woman of the 1950s. Hair, make-up, perfume, attire and fur. Maintenance of appearance is just the stage dressing, a simple part of the toolkit of social ambition. For the woman that Cuir d’Iris pushes into my imagination, the fur is pivotal. It doesn’t suggest the necessities of a cold climate. It connotes a symbolic viciousness, the conquering vulgarity of wearing a prize. It’s the draping of status on the body. It’s a warning.

    But forget my insipid fantasy. What does a well made perfume do for you?

    I tend to love the bolder leathers that others might call harsh. And perpetually forgetting the logic of Knize Ten, one of my favorite fragrances, I imagine the ‘floral leathers’ won’t appeal to me, since the flower will diminish the boldness. Cuir d’Iris is another reminder of this blind spot. I don’t have a specific test to judge a perfume’s success. I’m willing to be convinced. If I had to find the common thread among the successful perfumes, though, it’s that they remain interesting and appealing over hours and years. Each wearing is an interesting experience from start to finish and the perfume keeps me coming back over the years. I might have a story in my head, as the above fantasy/image. I could be relishing a mood. I might simply be enjoying the pleasures of a well-crafted object. The perfume doesn’t supply a narrative, it’s simply rich and well constructed. It’s loaded. Connotation is the key, not story-telling. Cuir d’Iris has a complexity of construction and a range of dynamic qualities that suggests symbolic violence to me---the threat of a slap to the face. It’s enticing. It’s the lure of dangerous pleasure---that something beautiful that just might come back to bite you.

    And so, my plea to the perfume producers. Give us perfumes with a richness of ideas. We’ll take care of the rest. I’m far more likely to respond to (note: and buy) a perfume that springs from artistic creativity. I want to get taken for a ride by the perfumer, not the test-marketing group. There is a place for formula and strategy, but they should be tools and not goals. Forget briefs that boil down to: ‘find the balancing point that offends the fewest and that a majority will tolerate.’ Give me the arresting, give me the subtle, but give me a perfume that instigates and inspires. I want a perfume that says more than, “Hey.” I want legibility and nuance. Maybe the preliminary threshold in producing a perfume should be a riff on Tania Sanchez’s rationale for wearing perfume: that it be significantly better than nothing at all.

    My plea is for better perfume, not more elaborate marketing. I love Cuir d’Iris though I’ve never seen any advertizing for it. I’m very impressed with Calvin Klein’s CK One Shock for Men despite its perfunctory, factory-formula promotion strategy. Niche perfumery doesn’t solve the marketing dilemma of the mass markets. I see no distinction between the marketing of Beyoncé Pulse Summer Edition (“Life is a flirt. Love is a game.” 1) and Penhaligon’s Sartorial, with notes that, “create the perfect illusion of a tailor’s workroom. 2” In both cases: words and perfume, no intrinsic association.

    I recognize that there are market considerations and that on one level, Parfumerie Generale likely wanted a floral leather in their line. Iris aromachemicals were readily available and iris perfumes were in demand. But Cuir d’Iris works not because it filled the right slot. It works because perfumer Pierre Guillaume was in the position to make a perfume composed of precision-made parts and dripping with ideas. Cuir d’Iris is a gorgeous perfume that embodies both the steely and the extravagant. It lunges at you at the outset and although it cozies up to your skin quickly, it growls at you when you don’t expect it.

    To summarize, thank you Mr. Guillaume. As I hope you can tell, I’m having a blast with Cuir d’Iris. It captures exactly what I love about perfume.

    1 http://www.beyonceparfums.com/pulse-summer-edition
    2 http://www.penhaligons.com/shop/men-s-grooming/shop-by-fragrance/sartorial/sartorial-eau-de-toilette-100ml-772486.html

    30th May, 2011 (Last Edited: 27 April, 2012)

    Fleurine's avatar

    United States United States

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    Mitsouko by Guerlain

    What to say about Mitsouko? Her reputation proceeds her. Even the name is mysterious. I blind bought this after reading many many intriguing reviews and anecdotes...I knew my collection wouldn't be complete without it. But, I was relieved and surprised to find that I also am able to wear Mitsouko. The overall feeling is classic, if old-fashioned, and well rounded , with a spicy cinnamon note in the base, middle notes including a familair jasmine/rose accord, as well as that well-blended peach note. I can't help but continue to to analyze this fragrance when I wear it. I love this fragrance for taking me on a trip back from 1919 up until today. If you have any interest in chypres, you must sample this one. But forewarned is forearmed, this bears little resemblance to most modern fragrances so if you get freaked out by the idea of "an old lady scent" do not blind-buy. Sample and enjoy!

    30th May, 2011 (Last Edited: 22 May, 2012)

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Elite by Floris

    A bright woody-floral fougere with pronounced notes of vetiver and cedar, a green-fruity-citrusy opening and a floral note exuding from the blend. The link of juniper berries and bay adds aromatic freshness since the beginning. The floral note is barely detectable and the fruits tend fastly to fade on the side of citrus in order to leave the scene to grass, traditional lavender, astringent cedar and rooty vetiver. The combination of lavender, amber and coniferous resins on the side of musks and realistic patchouli turns Elite out in a masculine and woodsy way. This is a nice daily scent with a traditional sort of british beat made of dynamism, class and sense of humor.

    30th May, 2011 (Last Edited: 16 July, 2014)

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Mûre et Musc Extrême by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    No. I see, together with Off-Scenter and others, a bombastic accord of blackberries-raspberries-white musk too much pushed towards the fruity side in the way that, unlike the original Mure et Musc, this one becomes unbalanced, overly fruity and deep, too much banal in substance. The Extreme one lacks that aqueous-woodsy subtle feel of the regular version. The daring original one (courageous formula) is not my cup of tea but is better for sure.

    30th May, 2011 (Last Edited: 16 July, 2014)

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Cooper Square by Bond No. 9

    A talky-ambery, fresh, slightly aromatic, vaguely resinous woodsy fragrance (in the same vein with Creed Royal Oud) with a traditional classic beat. The main accord of musk, vetiver, lavender and juniper berries elicits the basic boise temperament. There is lingering a more than vague mentholated vibe on the skin. The insertion of myrrh, olibanum and labdanum softens the green notes and determines a resinous finally humid/talky substance while a touch of cognac imprints a boozy-woody-fruity-tobacco veined vibe (and depth) as supported by a daring patchouli. Some precious woods fix down soft powdery mildness and structure. Cooper Square is a decent daily fragrance exuding a sense of silky and talky aromatic (green/musky) freshness. This quiet scent is neither innovative nor captivating but being a Bond one will be for sure overly expensive for all of us.

    30th May, 2011 (Last Edited: 16 July, 2014)

    knit at nite's avatar

    United States United States

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    Paradox Blue by Jacomo

    The bottle I tried recently just said Paradox (no blue). The bottle itself and the packaging (in a clear lucite box) was nice. The juice was another story- I got no fruity melon notes- that would have been an improvement. On my skin it was a cheap cleaning liquid scent all the way from top to bottom. The Jacomo brand is hit or miss on me, but I usually perceive quality in the products even if ithe notes don't thrill. Not this time. Keep me away from this Paradox.

    31st May, 2011

    JeanieE's avatar

    United States United States

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    Nectarine Blossom & Honey by Jo Malone

    Nectarine immediately but HEAVY, yummy honey within 30 minutes. Like all Jo Malones I've tried, you get what you read in the fragrance's title and not more, so you would be disappointed to expect complexity or depth. (That's what Chanels are for!!) A Jo Malone mood is light-hearted, pure, and clean. Organic, even. I think JM fragrances can only be fairly reviewed by a panel that accepts them for what they are intended: something set apart from the opulent, rich, glamorous, and puzzling. They don't require chapters of stuffy note descriptions or tricky evolving faceted ingredients, They are in-your-face little expressions of nature, and they are beautiful.

    31st May, 2011

    cello's avatar

    United States United States

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    Lavandula by Penhaligon's

    I'm not a fan of lavender as a prominent note in a fragrance, in fact, it can ofter seem very shrill and almost headache inducing to me - or maybe it is just overused in so many products these days.
    But I liked this Penhaligon take on the note. It is lavender, and it is pretty much only about lavender, but it seems the few supporting notes are made good use of.
    The opening lavender is supported by additional herbal notes, but it also feels slightly creamy rather than shrill. Very soft florals join in, possibly also contributing to the creamy feel. There is a natural, earthy feel to this herb/floral concoction.
    Lavandula fades to a slightly sweeter drydown, with a soft musk and vanilla - still lavender, but just a whisper of the opening strength.
    Very nice take on what can be an overpowering and overused note. It could be the lavender for lavender wary!

    31st May, 2011

    chet31's avatar

    United States United States

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    Antaeus by Chanel

    A nice soapy fragrance, smells like "clean," my favorite Chanel. Agree with others that a woman could wear this, my wife wants to try it.

    31st May, 2011

    odioustoilet's avatar

    Antarctica Antarctica

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    Wall Street by Victor

    I love you Wall Street, it's a "go to" scent for work or out-and-about on the town.
    I get cedar out of this but not synthetic, cloying, heavy or cheap!

    SirSlarty is right when he mentions its longevity, it is not long but we all know when it comes to scents it's better to go light more so than heavy.

    They did choose a good name for this, reminds me of a gentleman's study room or a gentlemen's club lounge area where everything features wood or is wrapped/bound in leather.

    I still can't believe what a hidden gem this is! Go out and get it and prepare to stand out and feel great for a low price!!!!!!!!!!

    TWO Thumbs UP

    31st May, 2011

    odioustoilet's avatar

    Antarctica Antarctica

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    English Leather Lime by Dana

    This gets a thumbs up because I am thinking that at one time this was probably longer lasting and projected more but the present product which is no longer made in the U.S. is rather weak.

    I love limes and the English Leather lineage is in the background and together they seem to combine to make a cedar-like accord at the top and thoughout.

    It is linear and does not "mature", evolve or change in any way. It must be re-applied after an hour. It is cheap and will not be a big let down for the price you pay.

    Now that I think of it............I guess I'll start off on a quest for a vintage bottle of the MEM version.


    31st May, 2011

    chet31's avatar

    United States United States

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    Bois du Portugal by Creed

    Others have described the scent better than I can. My first impression was to yawn, but after wearing it 3-4 times, I came to appreciate its unique, subtle, pleasant, and non-overpowering qualities. For me, the scent also improves the longer I wear it. For these reasons, I give it a thumbs up. However, probably not enough "joy" in it to wear regularly.

    31st May, 2011

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