Fragrance Reviews from August 2011

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    BetsyMeszaros's avatar

    United States United States

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    FlowerbyKenzo by Kenzo

    I think MISSSPRING's review really hit the nail on the head. She wrote:

    "If Flower by Kenzo were a blind date, the evening would evolve like this:
    He arrives and is better looking than you'd hoped, he has sex appeal and he is so incredibly charming. At the beginning of the date you are in heaven. Then he quickly starts to lose his allure and you begin to feel let down. "Is it me?" you wonder, as you are still hopeful. But after a short while, you find him definitely dull and even slightly annoying. "

    When I first put this on I really liked it -- almost as I do my beloved Shalimar. And then it turned to powder - nothing but poweder - and it won't go away.

    This is definitely not for me.

    19 August, 2011

    BetsyMeszaros's avatar

    United States United States

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    White Gardenia Petals by Illuminum

    This is the most beautiful fragrance I have ever encountered. Gardenias are my favorite flowers and this perfume smells exactly like a gardenia on a warm sultry southern summer night. It is not the least bit synthetic to me. It is just intoxicating. When I first put it on I kept smelling my wrist. I could not get enough of that gardenia. I was in heaven.

    About 20 to 30 minutes later it had the most beautiful floral scent. Like a bouquet of white flowers. The gardenia was gone but it was still wonderful.

    An hour later it smelled like Snuggle fabric softener. What a disappointment. At last I thought I had found the perfect gardenia scent but instead I ended up smelling like clean clothes. There are worse things to smell like but I won't be buying this fragrance.

    My search for the perfect gardenia scented perfume continues.

    19 August, 2011

    MakeMyEyesBurn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Salvador Dali pour Homme by Salvador Dali

    I blind bought a sample of this because of all evil references in most of the reviews on Basenotes.
    This smells like everything from 1970-1980 all mixed together. Surprisingly, it wasn’t as scary as I imagined and was slightly let down. I wanted a TOTALLY obnoxious scent, stronger than gasoline but, I didn’t get it.
    I describe this like an old dusty bottle of POLO, burning in hell, sprinkled with baby powder. The dry down was actually pleasant, but not worthy of a regular rotation for me.
    Unfortunately, it does contain the ‘grandpa’ note, that is to say, if your grandpa is CHUCK NORRIS.


    19 August, 2011

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Polo Blue by Ralph Lauren

    A surely better concoction (not hard to be) than Bvlgari Blu Pour Homme, which is a synthetic bath foam,a less metallic and shadowy creation than the better performed Chanel Blue Pour Homme, an even more fruity scent than the mediocre Dolce e Gabbana Light Blue Pour Homme, a far in craftsmanship fragrance from the surely superior elements of the series Blu Mediterraneo Acqua di Parma and finally an easy composition as Nel Blu dipinto di blu (Volare) by Domenico Modugno, this light weight aquatic is a poor in persistence juice based on the combination of fruits ( a lot of, cucumber and melon the stars, orange the princess), green notes and woodsy ambery elements. It's refreshing and deep in its intensely orangy temperament but ends to become boring and common in its widespread mossy-ambery-rooty-earthy dry down. Aquatic bore. Far better creations are Bvlgari Aqua, Fico di Amalfi, Kenzo  Pour Homme, Aria di mare by Il Profvmo and the experimental Coney Island Bond (genial the struggle between gourmand and tart-sour notes). Polo Blue is close to the skin and turns out for a while.

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 20th August, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Sables by Annick Goutal

    Sables follows a classical drydown arc: top, heart, basenotes. The real trick though is that is that it takes you from one genre to another over this progression.

    Starting with immortelle dissolved in amber, Sables gives you either a strictly sweet maple syrup candy, or a sweet and savory curry with fenugreek and raisins. It’s up to your nose. I get the latter. Either way I find it principally gourmand.

    Where Sables winds up, though is in the sandlewood/amber range. While the spice-like immortelle fades in the heartnotes, by drydown, there is a light, peppery sharpness that gives the amber drydown a mineral/dry inflections not miles from that of Ambre Sultan’s scent of hot stone. Sables is the only fragrance I can think of off the top of my head that isn’t categorized so much as a hybrid (eg. floriental, leather chypre…) but as a fragrance that starts in one genre (gourmand) and ends firmly in another (amber/oriental.)

    A gorgeously constructed fragrance, appropriate across the multiple (and I believe there really are many) genders, but would be a particularly smart statement of a devil-may-care appreciation of prettiness on an assured straight man.

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 21st August, 2011)

    virajrvyas's avatar

    India India

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    Nautica Blue by Nautica

    Its a good cheapo, nice summer fragrance, it might seem over synthetic when you spray first, but let it settle down, I can smell the water lily note, its stays an hour or so on my skin and develops into cedary sandalwood base with hint of mild citrus. It doesn't project much and wouldn't offend anyone.
    It can be a good workout frag or just for one of days you just want to apply something just to stay indoor. Nevertheless doesn't disappoint and last about 5-6 hours on my skin and sometimes even more!

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 21st August, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Lauder for Men by Estée Lauder

    A typically smart and category-merging fragrance from Lauder.

    Gorgeous start with a bright citrus tone that transitions comfortably to the strong green spirit connecting the top to the heartnotes (galbanum, juniper, clary sage.) It’s a beautiful synergy,and wonderfully constructed to allow you to continue to make out the individual notes. I’m a huge fan of clary sage oil and I just found myself giggling at how clear its voice was in this fragrance.

    By the heart of Lauder for Men, the florals rise fully to the surface. Maybe jasmine, and a sharp carnation, but muget. Muguet! Who thought of putting that odd combination of delicacy and potency that the muget conveys in the middle of this potent chypre née fougère? Brilliant move! The heavy, almost waxy floral quality that muguet imparts is the ideal piece to transform the heart slowly to a woody/tobacco base.

    People call this a brute, a Masculine Power Frag, a knuckle-dragger? Wow, I know my gender sensors might be calibrated differently than most, but I find Lauder a wonderfully assured, long-lasting fragrance that is ultimately a floral chypre that could easily be worn within current American gender norms by both men and women.

    Lauder for Men reminds me that while Estée Lauder is principally known for its feminine fragrances, to my mind, their best fragrances are the Lauder/Aramis masculines.

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 25 August, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Dior Addict by Christian Dior

    Dior Addict starts as a dessert-like floriental of the contemporary school. Its initial tone is expansive but heavy, but it winds up an interestingly monochromatic oriental where vanilla and tonka cancel each other out and give a loud, beige tone.

    I don’t understand Addict, but it’s a bit of a guilty pleasure that I spray on in department stores. Believe me, I ask myself each time, “Why on earth am I doing this?” Every bit of me tells me I should hate this. I guess I enjoy chasing that shouldn’t-but-do experience. Reminds me I can still be surprised and that the notion of good taste is often nothing compared to trashy fun.

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 25 August, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Eau Sauvage by Christian Dior

    Have you noticed Eau Sauvage is like some sort of Ouija board? We make it spell out whatever we’re hoping to channel. Chypre, magic all-day cologne, fresh jasmine, woody citrus. I get a sparkling candied lemon and a cool sip of water at the start, but it winds up an interestingly woody floral, the wood stemming from petitgrain and rosemary, the floral from jasmine/hedione. I do see the through-line from ES to the shadier Diorella, but forgetting for a moment that ES preceded Diorella, ES is so squeaky clean as to seem like Diorella only after many years sober.

    If hedione is the aromachemical that adds or enhances a watery, green jasmine feel, it certainly skips the indoles here. Where Diorella flirts with you in a languorous drawl, ES gives elocution lessons. You choose which suit your mood.

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 08 September, 2011)

    ExtremeK's avatar

    United States United States

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    Aomassaï 10 by Parfumerie Generale

    I'll just admit this right up front: I love Aomassai. Of course, I'm also partial to sweet vanilla-based gourmands, so if neither vanilla nor gourmands are up your alley, Aomassai may not be for you.

    But while the vanilla is there -- in all of its sweet, warm, gooey goodness -- it never takes center stage. That honor belongs to the hazelnuts, incense, and woods.

    On me, Aomassai is all about warm, toasted woods, and I agree completely with the reviewer who feels "autumn" in this fragrance. Aomassai evokes the crisp, sunny autumn Saturday of a football game in New England, where roasted nuts predominate over smoked meats and where the sky is so perfectly blue you want to cry. And then, as the sun sets and the chill of the evening descends, it wraps you in the warm sweetness of the balsam, vanilla, and resins.

    It's just lovely.

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 15 September, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Kouros by Yves Saint Laurent

    I’ve worn Kouros on and (mostly) off since its release. I’ve never found it skanky or off-putting in the least. Categorically, I find it a musky, spicy-floral fougère. I’ll admit the musks give it a bit of a mammalian undertone, but the clove, botany’s super antimicrobial, more than holds the unwashed at bay. I tend to find the musks that others find raunchy, dirty or displeasing merely skin-sweet and appealing. I find Muscs Koublai Khan adorable and actually a bit quaint.

    So here’s my scorecard on the judgments leveled on Kouros:

    Musky? —Yes. Sweet like the skin at the nape of someone’s neck.
    Clovelike? —Yes, cool to the touch.
    Indolic? — Yes. Orange blossom.
    Urinous? — No. Maybe elsewhere in the world there are Kouros-scented urine cakes, but I get neither the urinal nor the urine vibe.
    Poopy? — No. Simply, no.
    Powerhouse? Compared to an eau de cologne for instance, yes. Otherwise, merely works like a fragrance. (You know, you’re supposed to smell it.)

    All I knew on my own skin before Kouros was the original Chanel’s Antaeus. It was dark and brooding and had huge projection and sillage. I wasn’t sparing in applying Antaeus and while it left a wake a mile wide behind me, I believe it also actually preceded me into a room as well. By comparison, Kouros was a sweet pussycat.

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 28 September, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Égoïste / L'Égoïste by Chanel

    A nice woody-fruity fragrance will be at least somewhat attractive to 75% of those who smell it. It is undemanding and hits the right buttons. It’s like a blooming flower in this respect. Who actively dislikes jasmine or rose? Egoiste uses this moderate prettiness to gear up to striking beauty.

    Egoiste is a pseudo-oriental that beat the Lutens ‘new oriental’ Feminite du Bois to the fruity/cedary punch, but replaced restraint with largesse. Where you might admire FdB with a “well done” you just want to ooch Egoiste’s cheeks squealing “you are TOO cute!” FdB has a growing harmony that is a function of its radiance. Egoiste is a big diva-like melody with built-in backup singers.

    Egoiste composes an accord that hits all the right tones we love about sandlewood---vanillic, creamy, fruity-sweet, at once rounded and sharp. I find the actual woodiness, though, to be a cedar, rosewood and musk blend of perfect pitch paired with vanilla and who knows what else. I think Egoiste has survived since the 1980s fully intact, despite the sandlewood drought, because it emulates sandlewood the way Guerlain’s Nahema calls to mind a rose: by employing a superb chemical geometry to create an olfactory allusion. The herbal touch completes the picture and creates a medicinal tone that keeps the sweet creaminess from crossing the line to toothaching.

    Egoiste makes me wonder (other than exceptions such as Dior Homme and Guerlains’s Heritage) why designer men’s fragrances don’t strive for beauty instead of tolerating the low expectation of skimpy, vernacular handsomeness as a goal.

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 28 September, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Womanity by Thierry Mugler

    Nice start: candied citrus. Nothing new, a sort of candied grapefruit (Caviar? Spare me.) After the brief opening, Womanity cycles through a vague floral mid-top note to a sweet but thin oriental, and eventually acquires its only element of interest: a woody, milky fig leaf. (The fig leaf is a cute metaphorical joke. I'll give Mugler that. A fig leaf is intended to hide your private parts. Remember the shape of a fig leaf, though, and consider just whose parts. Hint: not womanity's.) This fig leaf folds nicely into the oriental heart, but soon fades and Womanity hits the wall. It stops at a hackneyed, sweet woody tone and goes no further. Futuristic? Otherworldy? No. Commonplace? Yes. Suburban in its heart of hearts? Yes.

    There is a strong sense of entropy and dissolution to the Mugler line:

    • Angel (avenging angel)
    • Innocent (happy angel)
    • Angel Garden of Stars (flood of flankers)
    • Alien (shrill, but conceptually a ‘pretty’ floral)
    • Les Parfums [insert random word] (might be something interesting in here, but who’s going to dig through 13 simultaneously released flankers?)
    • Les Miroirs (see above, change 13 to 5)
    • Womanity (the fragrance aimed at the woman who was the girl who wore fruity-
    floral/cotton candy perfumes 10 years ago)

    What’s next, Angel Adolescent in another overly-styled bottle simply filled with sugar-water?

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 05 April, 2012)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

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    Terre d'Hermès by Hermès

    I first tried Terre d’Hermès in the EDT concentration and it didn’t appeal to me. It seemed flat and its oiliness seemed somehow petrochemical. Well today I tried the parfum and I see it very differently. It is smooth and balanced where the EDT was actually a bit nauseating. (I did also try the EDT again today and my assessment of it hasn’t changed.) TdH has the only grapefruit note in perfumery I’ve ever liked. In tying it to bergamot and a vegetal quality, the sulfur is gone and the rich piquancy remains. What also remains is an aromatically sweet, metallic stone-like scent.

    TdH is linear, but has a single, wide accord that seems to surround you. It is radiant like many other contemporary linear masculines (a heavy hand with the Iso-E Super), but it seems to encompass you rather than emanate from you. The parfum is direct, yet soft-spoken, well-balanced. There is nothing superfluous, yet there's no feeling of starkness.

    TdH is not my style of perfumery, and I have no plan to buy it, but I would highly recommend it, and recognize the artistry, thoughtful consideration and likely enormous amount of editing and honing that went into its making.

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 05 April, 2012)

    Fleurine's avatar

    United States United States

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    Anaïs Anaïs by Cacharel

    You know I had to wear this about 5 times before I could get it...to me this is a very white incense fragrance. If you are an incense fanatic this is one for your collection because it is such a different use of incense. This scent is very charming and innocent and somewhat fascinating, aside from being iconic.

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 26 August, 2012)

    drseid's avatar

    United States United States

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    Nautica Classic by Nautica

    I regret admitting I used to own this several years ago. I hated it back then (a gift from a friend... or was it an enemy). One of the most annoying fragrances I have smelled. Very aquatic and cloying. Avoid this 1 star out of 5 puppy like the plague!

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 28 December, 2012)

    drseid's avatar

    United States United States

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    Encre Noire by Lalique

    Encre Noire starts off very subtle and slightly fresh with its extremely brief top notes, then quickly transitions to a linear smoky vetiver with a good dose of Iso E Super (Cedar) mixed in for good measure among other things. The dry-down is somewhat similar to Terre d"Hermes without the orange and with more of the smoky vetiver. This is a classy scent to be sure, and it already has vaulted its way into my heart. As an aside, I have read many folks associating this with Guerlain's Vetiver but not I. I don't think they smell remotely alike, and I feel Encre Noire is in another stratosphere (no offense intended to GV and its supporters). I went many years thinking I did not like vetiver scents, but obviously I just had not tried the right one yet... Now I have. 4 to 4.5 out of 5 stars.

    19 August, 2011 (Last Edited: 12 April, 2013)

    30 Roses's avatar

    United States United States

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    Love's Rain Forest by Love's

    Love's Rain Forest is green/aquatic and pleasant enough for the $6.25 sale price I paid today at CVS for the 1.5 oz. spray. Nice to wear in hot weather.

    This will never win any awards-- maybe it should really get a neutral rating-- but since I liked it enough to buy it after using the tester, I'm giving it a thumbs up. If you liked B&BW Rainkissed Leaves, you may like Love's Rain Forest.

    Note that this is not the same formula as Love's Rain Scent.

    20th August, 2011

    sherapop's avatar

    United States United States

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    Fracas by Robert Piguet

    FRACAS is, to me, the queen of the diva-worthy perfumes. Unapologetic and insistent, even haughty, but with every right in the world, for she is a beauty indeed. This lush, seductive tuberose composition has extraordinary longevity and diva-worthy sillage. Nothing really compares to FRACAS. Well, except maybe MAHORA, the last great Guerlain perfume, IMNSHO, not coincidentally launched in Y2K, and now out of production, in perfect conformity with numerous other managerial blunders that have characterized and indeed caused the once-illustrious house's tragic Fall from glory. But I digress...

    I find FRACAS simply exquisite and peerless among perfumes still in production—at least the ones familiar to me. This is a bona fide classic which retains and will retain its integrity (I have been assured of this by the surprisingly accessible management chez Robert Piguet).

    So why, exactly, is this composition so good? My best guess is that FRACAS was created by a perfumer given the freedom to work unfettered by marketing data. It's not just the use of high-quality and exquisite materials, but the way in which they have been put together. It's easy to lose sight of this once important aspect of perfumery in a world in which niche launches proliferate like rabbits, many with top-notch notes, but no real inspiration behind them. I imagine the brainstorming that goes on at some of these houses, leading to composition by committee: “Let's make a fig perfume, and an oud, and we need a coffee, too.” The list goes on and on....

    The greatness of FRACAS inheres in its coherence and complex synthetic unity, which most contemporary launches lack, having been hacked together rather haphazardly under pressure to put out as many new perfumes as quickly as possible, instead of taking the time needed to incubate and nurture a genuine work of art.

    In the end, to wear FRACAS successfully, you must tap into your inner diva. The wearer must conquer the perfume through her own self-confidence and self-presentation, thus completing the work through contributing directly to its ability to cast a tantalizing spell.

    20th August, 2011

    sherapop's avatar

    United States United States

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    Fidji by Guy Laroche

    I was initially quite disappointed when I spritzed on some FIDJI from a recently purchased (and anxiously anticipated!) bottle of edt. The perfume did not bear much resemblance at all to my memory of my first encounter with a vintage sample of a perfume by the same name. I re-read my earlier gushing review of vintage FIDJI (at The Other Site) and realized at once that only reformulation could explain the disparity.

    Upon seeing BayKAT's sage warning (in her review, below), I recognized that I had been played for a dupe. Yes, once again, I had been bamboozled into buying a 100ml bottle of a perfume based essentially on a lie, to wit: that the contents of this bottle, labeled FIDJI, were essentially the same as the contents of the sample vial which motivated me to seek out and acquire this perfume in the first place. Alas, FIDJI is not FIDJI anymore.

    All of that said, I have to admit that now, having recovered from the initial shock of my dashed expectations, I do actually like the new FIDJI, for what it is: a relatively dry and green floral inching toward the chypre line (and boasting both oak moss and tree moss among its ingredients), but still spare enough to be more of a floral than anything else. A dry white floral with big jasmine and, it seems to me, neroli. This FIDJI (though I am tempted to refer to it now as FUDJI...) is a very nice, sprightly floral green. Neither opulent nor tropical in the least, this composition is closer to BALMAIN than it is to FRACAS: dry, crisp, and clean.

    20th August, 2011

    jauraistoujoursfaimdetoi's avatar



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    Prada Candy by Prada

    Smells like a cheap musky drugstore fragrance. Not feeling this one at all.

    20th August, 2011

    Buysblind's avatar

    United States United States

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    H.M. by Hanae Mori

    This review is for the EDT.


    H.M. is kind of unique in that it is a gourmand that is also highly suitable for warmer temperatures. This is due to the nice lemony citrus that remains present for the life of the scent as well as the moderately transparent nature of the fragrance.

    H.M. opens with lavender and a citrus that I would describe as a sweet, candied lemon. It is accompanied by a light, though noticeable, blackcurrant note, which wafts in and out of the citrus, and some vanilla. I find the middle stage fantastic as the floral notes develop and compliment the opening very well. While H.M. is a gourmand fragrance, the floral aspect balances it, detracting from its 'foodiness.' The flowers are soft and unimposing, used to embellish rather than dominate. The final stage of H.M. exudes a heavier quality than was present in the opening and mid. Though the lemon persists, what you are basically left with is vanilla, chocolate, amber, and possibly some oakmoss. The lemon-chocolate combination is delicious, and reminds me of a lemon cake with chocolate icing.

    I believe this is a very well-done fragrance. I found it immediately likeable. It is never clumsy, boring, or thin, and all the ingredients compliment each other very well. There are distinct stages throughout its development and they occur by way of the smoothest transitions. However, if over-applied, H.M. can become too sweet and cloying. I recommend a light application--two sprays and you're good to go. Don't worry, sillage and longevity are excellent.

    The biggest complaint I've noticed with H.M. is that it's too sweet, or too effeminate, or both. Well,it IS sweet. But, with a light application it is not as sweet and does not become cloying. As far as its feminine quality is concerned, I'm not so sure. It is definitely not a 'manly' fragrance, but I wouldn't necessarily say that its feminine. I think it could be easily classified as unisex. I wouldn't mind if my girlfriend wore it because I think it smells so good, and at the same time, I don't mind wearing it myself.

    H.M. is a casual gourmand fragrance that gives off something of a youthful vibe. It seems most appropriate for laid back dates or just hanging out. It can be worn in cold and warm weather, though I recommend not using it on really hot or humid days as the vanilla and chocolate will become cloying.

    Relatively inexpensive, H.M. is definitely worth the money if you are in the market for this type of scent.

    20th August, 2011

    kodafume's avatar



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    Virgin Island Water by Creed

    I greatly enjoy the spirit of this frag from it's mojito opening to it's warm cocoa butter drydown. It actually does smell like a vacation in the Caribbean on some resort beach. If I were in Antarctica and needed a pick me up I would definitely put this on.

    But at the creed price level I come to expect something more. After all you could spend a few hundred dollars on a small bottle of VIW.......or you could go to any after work sport bar, order a mojito, spill some on your shirt, and then apply $5 a bottle sunblock and end up with exactly the same notes.

    So why bother?

    Then there is the citronella note...I can't help but compare the drydown unfavorably to Off insect repellant. Not constantly, the coconut is too strong, but in little whiffs every now and then "Is somebody wearing bug repellant? Oh it's my frag"

    20th August, 2011

    Distinguished_Gentleman's avatar



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    1 Million by Paco Rabanne

    I wasn't sure what to expect of this fragrance at first even after seeing the reviews on it. I must say that I enjoyed it. It opens up very nice. Strong but nice. I know some people have a problem with the strong opening. But it doesn't last that long. On my skin about 30 to 45 minutes. Then it dries down and stays just a little closer to the skin. People compare it to the John Varvatos by John Varvatos. But that doesn't last near as long as this. Also, we aren't just wearing cologne because we like it. We also wear it because women like it. I get nothing but great compliments from this. So lets look at the real reason most of us wear these. Because they are appealing and non offensive to women. At least thats why I do. I work around all women, so hey. The scent however though is pretty linear throughout. But its just very enticing. Very good on a date or where this is some open space. The scent trail is great. Test it and try for yourself.

    20th August, 2011

    MakeMyEyesBurn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Body Kouros by Yves Saint Laurent

    Let me start off 1st, by saying, this review is biased. It is biased because I learned (thanks to this website and others), that I strongly favor men’s colognes, that fall under the ‘Oriental Spice’ category. Kouros Body is an oriental/spice cologne. Keep that in mind as you read my review.
    It is said, that the sense of smell is more tied to memory, than any of the others, including vision. A few years ago, this couple walked past me at a concert. I smelled the sexiest smell of all time. I literally stopped in my tracks, and was compelled to ask the guy and the girl, what they were wearing, but the guy looked like the type that might misconstrue my question, as hitting on his girlfriend, so I never asked.
    Fast-forward 8 years later and a couple dozen cologne sample suggestions later (from fellow Basenoters-Thank You), I got my sample of Kouros Body. BINGO !!!!!!!!!! I was instantly teleported back in time to that concert. I was 100% certain, I had found ‘the scent.’
    Reunited at last.
    If you tend to favor Oriental-Spice fragrances, Kouros Body is easily a blind buy for you. I can’t describe it any better than most of the thumbs up reviews here already. My favorite being the ‘caramelized river running through fields of cotton candy’ review. On the surface, that sounds too cloying and sugary for me. Now combine that review with a negative review saying it reminded him of baby wipes. BOTH reviews are right!
    4 sprays in the morning and my projection completely neutralized my co-workers Green Irish Tweed. I was fully aware of my smell for at least 6 hours.
    Thumbs up for a very sexy scent in an absolutely horrible bottle because you can’t see how much is left.

    20th August, 2011

    Larimar's avatar

    Austria Austria

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    Rose by Caron

    Get me right here... this smells good, of quality and worthy of Caron and its fountain extraits. I am also sorry when a classic that has been around for decades is bound to disappear eventually. Yes, Rose is according to the Paris, Boutique Montaigne discontinued. It was also removed from their website. I know that they still have some bottles at the Montaigne Boutique (August 2011), if you want to stock up on it.
    I think this is not unique and outstanding enough next to N'aimez que moi or Or et Noir. Losing rose means to lose components that are there in both the other fountain extraits. Rose is fairly pretty and and next to Acaciosa one of the fountain extraits for girlies at heart.

    20th August, 2011

    Scent-e-mental's avatar

    Australia Australia

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    Donald Trump The Fragrance by Donald Trump

    I gave this a thumbs up only because there's no thumbs diagonal icon. The fragrance starts off with a bizarre bubblegum- meets- nail poish- remover accord (or is it discord?). Afterwards it settles down into a fairly generic woody spicy fragrance with a touch of sweetness. It actually reminds me somewhat of Kenneth Cole Signature.

    20th August, 2011

    LadyDragonFire's avatar



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    Coriandre by Jean Couturier

    Unfortunately this fragrance comes across smelling like heavily perfumed soap on me when I first apply it. At least, it makes me think of soap more than anything else. On the one hand I don't fully dislike this fragrance, and there is definitely something about it that almost makes me want to give it a thumbs up and a slightly higher rating. On the other hand though I'm left with a feeling that this is a bit of an overly "stinky" perfume. It might be nice on some people, but I probably wouldn't make this one my signature scent.

    20th August, 2011

    sherapop's avatar

    United States United States

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    Jasmin de Nuit by The Different Company

    It's always a bad sign when you look forward to the disappearance from your skin of the scent you are currently wearing. Alas, this is the case with EPICES DE NUIT, er, JASMIN DE NUIT by The Different Company.

    Well, this one is different: no argument there, and some wearers will delight in this mélange of star anise, cinnamon, cardamom, and probably everything else in the spice drawer, along with a few jasmine petals. My impression is that perfumer was trying to plump up the indolic facet of the jasmine through the skillful use of hard-hitting spices. The effect, to my nose, is rather like the athlete who plies himself with hormones in order to win the race, but later is exposed, forced to retreat from public life in ignominy.

    In perfect comformity with Murphy's law of perfume (according to which everything I love is discontinued and everything I hate has infinite longevity) this composition is so tenacious that I fear only a long, hot bath will relieve my body of the smell. On a positive note: anyone who likes this sort of thing will be happy to learn that even a couple of drops of this parfum masquerading as an edt packs a powerful punch. Although I am trapped in a fog of spice emanations, my sample "cube" is nearly full.

    To reiterate: definitely not for me.

    20th August, 2011

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Basile Uomo (new) by Basile

    May be in this version are slightly toned down herbs and citrus but the new Basile Uomo smells almost identical to the original one.

    20th August, 2011

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