Fragrance Reviews from September 2011

    Showing 241 to 270 of 975.
    CardaGiorgio's avatar

    Spain Spain

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Allure Homme by Chanel

    This is one of my favourite fragrances. Some floral, some sweet, some citrus, some woody........the perfect indefinable. It takes elements from several olfactive families to create an original and quality smell. Allure Homme is a very warm scent with a good projection and longevity. Is elegant, is sophisticated and very addictive for me.

    08 September, 2011

    subutex's avatar

    Singapore Singapore

    Show all reviews

    rating


    L'Eau D'Issey pour Homme by Issey Miyake

    Perhaps there has been a reformulation somewhere, since alot of people seem to think this is excellent.

    Well, i wouldn't say it is lousy-it is a very neutral type of fragrance, something people will not find cloying or offensive.

    And why is that so?




    because it smells like air freshener.

    08 September, 2011

    LadyDragonFire's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    Hanae Mori (new / Butterfly) by Hanae Mori

    This fragrance distinctly reminds me of the vanilla EDT from The Body Shop with super sweet fruity notes added to it. It also reminds me a lot of the Harajuku Lovers Lil' Angel fragrance. I actually like The Body Shop's vanilla fragrance quite a bit, but I've never been a fan of Lil' Angel. My body chemistry seems to bring out the candied fruit notes like crazy and I find the smell a little too overly sweet. This EDT would have been better (in my opinion) if the fruit notes were more subtle, the way they are in the Body Shop's vanilla EDT. I still don't dislike this scent enough to give it a thumbs down, but it's definitely something that I have to be in right mood for, because it's really not a subtle fragrance. However, I would definitely recommend it to the fans of Lil' Angel, and to anyone who really loves very sweet gourmand fragrances.

    08 September, 2011

    subutex's avatar

    Singapore Singapore

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Terre d'Hermès by Hermès

    I am really astounded.

    When i sprayed this on my arm today, i was overwhelmed by the opening notes. Overpowering! So much so that i gagged and choked. My girlfriend had the same reaction too.


    Afterwards, in the lift, everyone around me looked uncomfortable and covered their noses.


    Just these reactions, are enough to stop me from buying it.


    But i'll say it is indeed an uniqe fragrance, extremely masculine. Not everyone can carry this off.

    08 September, 2011

    subutex's avatar

    Singapore Singapore

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Dior Homme Intense by Christian Dior

    This is now my signature fragrance. Not only so, but my comfort scent. I wear it to work, i wear it to sleep at night.

    08 September, 2011

    blueyezz's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Cuir by Lancôme

    Wonderful leathery opening, drying down to a polite woody oriental. The reviewer who said the drydown was like a Shalimar pour Homme is dead on.

    My first blind buy and I'm slightly disappointed. I was hoping - rather stupidly - for something as animalic and plush as Cuir de Russie and its certainly not that. However, its less than quarter of the price so daily application won't cause me the emotional and spiritual pain I feel when I dab on the Chanel extrait.

    I'm giving it a thumbs up. It only just achieves this (a 7.5 out of 10). I hope to enjoy it more on successive wearings.

    08 September, 2011

    blueyezz's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

    Show all reviews

    rating


    parfums*PARFUMS Series 3 Incense: Kyoto by Comme des Garçons

    Wonderful. A far less literal interpretation of incense than Avignon, more radiant and uplifting. Whilst many incenses seem to go down the dusty church and ecclesiastical route, this one showcases the resinous sharpness redolent of a pine forest.

    On a par with the exemplary Jubilation XXV.

    08 September, 2011

    alfarom's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Nomade by D'Orsay

    A toned down version of Declaration. A short-lived spicy-woody concoction that has a quite catching opening but, overall, it's far from being original or particularly interesting. My biggest disappointment comes with the drydown (that occours pretty soon), where Le Nomade turns to a pale and clean woody-musk that's way too generic. Not completely bad but let's face it, in this genre we can have much better options.

    08 September, 2011

    Randy Marsh's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    Banana Republic Classic by Banana Republic

    Very nice. Citrusy, summery, subtle and clean. Does not last long but the bassnotes are heavenly fresh. I find the smell lingers longer on clothing than it does on my skin. Doesn't stand out in terms of longevity or pungence, but doesn't offend either. B+/A-

    08 September, 2011

    Moonlit Snowflake's avatar

    England England

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Ghost by Ghost

    I adore Ghost. Im so surprised, as i often prefer heavier gourmade or oriental scents, but this fragrance is so enchanting.
    To me the delicately encapsulating fragrance of Ghost evokes images of a beautiful naked woman draped in an airy white silk gown, floating through an enchanted forest filled with fluttering fairies, unicorns and rare blooming flowers.
    Its an ethereal, light, floaty scent, but with something at its core that makes it more special - mystical almost.
    I would describe this as a light fruity-floral scent. I definitely detect some watery, light, fruity notes along with the flowers.. and a sweetness that still somehow manages to feel soft & fresh.
    I love to wear this scent after my bath - I feel so pure, floaty, feminine and almost.. magical! It gently envelops me like a swirl of silk & transports me to my enchanted forest every time i wear it.
    The only negative i can give is that the lasting power of the EDT is not super good. Certainly not bad, but not as long-lasting as id like - to be expected with an EDT though. If only they'd bring out a Ghost EDP.. then i'd have my *perfect* scent (especially for when i want to feel like the virgin goddess of the mystical forest!). =)

    08 September, 2011

    Moonlit Snowflake's avatar

    England England

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Mûre et Musc Extrême by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    Now please dont anybody take this the wrong way, especially if you're a Mure et Musc lover .. but this scent literally made me want to vomit!
    I got a strong aroma of sweaty, dirty bum (seriously, i kid you not. Does no-one else get this?) laced with sickly sweetness. Literally like someone had poured some sweet, syrupy gloop down a sweaty, dirty bum-crack. Thats the mental picture i got with every sniff, and couldnt shake off (no wonder i wanted to vomit, right?). I think the musk notes in this must be the animaly, dirty type musk? (rather than the soapy, clean white musks im used to).
    And the sweet notes.. something akin to artificial (rotten) fruit. Urgh! For someone who is usually a lover of sweet gourmande notes this is just WAY too synthetically, nausiatingly sweet, even for me.
    So yeah, for a scent i was dying to sample, and thought i would LOVE, this turned out to be a wholly unpleasant experience. I NEVER want to have to smell this odour again.
    Actually, i tell you what else it reminded me of: When someone has been in the bathroom and, erm, stunk it out, and then sprayed a load of cheap sickly dewberry airfreshener to cover it up, but it just mingles into a sweet, poopy, dirty, gag-reflexing stench.
    Yup, thats Mure et Musc in a nutshell for me. Thoroughly disgusting. :(

    08 September, 2011

    Moonlit Snowflake's avatar

    England England

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Dolce Vita by Christian Dior

    Happy.. happy.. HAPPY! I cant help but smile when i wear this fragrance - it's literally sunshine in a bottle! A sniff of this transports me to a sun-drenched, secluded spot in the south of France, sipping champagne cocktails and laughing softly whilst wearing a feminine full-length sun-dress & wide-brimmed hat, dripping with gold jewellery!
    OK.. so my description leaves a lot to be desired, but somehow this scent makes me feel flirty, feminine, relaxed and youthful, yet refined, classy and 'grown-up' all at the same time.
    For me this is the perfect scent for summer.

    08 September, 2011

    Bartlebooth's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

    Show all reviews

    rating


    La Nuit de L'Homme by Yves Saint Laurent

    Reviews for fragrances like YSL La Nuit De L’Homme are the most beastly to compose. Any accurate description quickly exhausts the generous supply of synonyms for banality. Anyway, here goes.

    La Nuit is fragrant Mogadon, a vista of sweet laden accords completed with an off the peg oriental finish. Although it probably is not aimed at cynical, hoary old men like me, I am still surprised at the rope-a-dope mentality of YSL in creating something as superfluous as this. This beacon of mediocrity will clearly disappear within a short time, and I shall rue the day I wasted many minutes pecking out this eulogy to the useless.

    08 September, 2011

    sherapop's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Féerie by Van Cleef & Arpels

    Who among us can forget Violet Beauregarde, the chubby American girl in the twentieth-century film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory? Whenever Violet was not in the process of eating something, she satisfied her oral fixation by chomping loudly on gum, not at all unlike a cow with its cud. She acquired a winning ticket in the Willy Wonka contest and so was admitted to the chocolate factory, along with Charlie, the nemesis of all of the other contestants. Violet was accompanied to the factory by her loud, aggressive father, Sam Beauregarde, who was apparently either a politician or (vel) a used car salesman. Charlie, in this nouveau-Dickensian little tale, just happened to be situated at the extreme tip of the other side of the poverty line, far away from all of the other winners, and it was nothing short of miraculous that he happened by chance upon one of the winning tickets.

    In the end, karma dictated that all of the naughty and/or vicious little children should be punished, including Violet, whose tragic Fall was occasioned by her brazen disobedience of a direct order not to chew a piece of experimental gum. Violet blew up like a gigantic blueberry not only for her aesthetic crime of chomping constantly on gum but also for her cut-throat competitiveness, which really did her in, in precisely the manner in which one might expect karma to work: like a knife (or a bolt, see below...) in the back. She came dangerously close to exploding before being rolled down the hall to the juicing room by the oompa loompas for triage. Although Violet was spared the death penalty, she was summarily stripped of the right to romp about the grounds of the chocolate factory as a direct result of this self-induced medical emergency.

    ***

    Perhaps you, dear reader, did not remember Violet Beauregarde, but I am fairly confident that the makers of Van Cleef & Arpels FEERIE did, for it is clear that she provided the deep inspiration for this creation. From the über-cloying black currant syrup sprinkled with violet leaves to the trucker tire-flap icon reproduced in miniature statuette form and applied to the ice-pick-like cap, FEERIE embodies the essence of Violet Beauregarde aesthetic.

    I can state without hyperbole that this is the sweetest ostensibly serious perfume I've ever sniffed. Although I've been known to bitch and moan about dilution, this composition has basically the opposite problem, being so thick and glucose-rich that it could easily be mistaken for one of those fruit syrups that come in bulbous bottles with sliding pour mechanisms—the ones arrayed in a lazy susan of sorts in booth tables at fine eateries such as the International House of Pancakes, no doubt frequented by the Beauregarde family. Rather than a fruity floral, I'd say FEERIE is a true fruity-fruity perfume, because the syrupy black currant note is so dominant and so persistent and so thick and so, well, black curranty, that it is precisely like Violet Beauregarde in its extreme egotism, excluding all else as it screams out “Me! Me! Me! ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!”

    Although FEERIE might mix well with a rose soliflore, as a stand-alone perfume, it pretty much deserves the karmic fate eventually suffered by Violet Beauregarde, fittingly enough. Even the bottle is bright blueberry blue, and although the edges are faceted, from a distance, it evokes in this viewer's mind memories of one and one thing alone: Violet Beauregarde as her girth continues to expand to its ultimate bursting point while her face turns progressively more blue.

    Now for the intricate embellishments, the carefully thought-out "finishing touches" upon the vessel in which this fruit syrup is housed. Once again, as with ORIENS, Van Cleef & Arpels has come up with a beautiful bottle totally degraded by its over-the-top cap! I'm beginning to suspect, actually, that those working in the art department of this house have a secret wager going: who can get away with the kitschiest cap on a perfume successfully launched before being served their walking papers? To my amazement, FEERIE actually manages to defeat (and that is no mean feat, by any means!) ORIENS, indisputably winning the top honors in the “most ridiculous cap ever” category! How in the world did the artist get away with this? Every American inhabiting the broad underbelly of this land—including the Beauregarde family—knows the naked lady on the tire flaps of semi-trucks: this image is virtually ubiquitous to anyone who drives cross country on freeways. There she sits amidst only her curves, beckoning YOU, her leg suggestively bent, a bust thrust directed your way.

    If you don't know what I'm talking about, you must be a city dweller—or else a for'ner. The next time that you embark on a road trip in this not-so-fair land, I exhort you to take a few moments, pull into a truck stop, and examine the tire flaps on the semis parked there. Yes, *that very image*, the Platonic Form of the “Curvy Naked Lady Looking to Sleep with You” has been fashioned into a tiny silver three-dimensional facsimile which has been nailed (literally—there's a visible bolt in her back!)—as to a crucifix—to the ice pick atop the FEERIE bottle! (The ice pick itself is perfect, by the way, for pricking swollen blueberries...) Amazing! Truly an accomplishment of sorts. I stand humbled before the person who pulled this job off. Bravo!

    08 September, 2011 (Last Edited: 09 September, 2011)

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Apparition Homme Intense by Ungaro

    The richer, more intense version of the original formula turned out more spicy and mellow by the insertion of spices (coriander, nutmeg?) in the middle and vanilla in the base.  The outcome is a vetiver and licorice smell turned out creamy by a milky foundation. The ambery-vanillic dry down rounds the smell of the original Apparirion Homme with a more intense and milky approach. I agree with the Shifty Bat's review in that the traditional musk-vanilla aromatic accord we met in La Male or Lolita Lempika Ph is not approched in here by watery lavender and aquatic citrus-fruits but is flanked by a clever usage of licorice, rhubarb and spices. This implementation restrains the synthetic and a bit aquatic beat of the original formula and rounds it with a reinforced note of amber, licorice, an intenser liquorous temperament and a vanillic mellow final addition. A better balanced, more intense and less watery kind of flanker.

    08 September, 2011 (Last Edited: 09 September, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Patrick by Fragrances of Ireland

    I love angular fougères. I've written that so many times on basenotes it feels like a mantra. If anyone is still producing encyclopedias in hard-bound book form (do they still exist?) the entry for fougère should have a scratch-and-sniff of Patrick. Others here on Basenotes have described it better than I can, so I'll just say that it's remarkably concise yet expressive. It so perfectly captures the soapiness, that defining attribute of the best fougères. It is exuberant yet simple, soapy yet earthy. These dualities make it not just interesting, but conversational.

    The coumarin/lavender/musk balance is flawless, but Patrick, for all its simplicity and directness makes me marvel at the slow sleight of hand that takes place. The hay-like, singing fougère moves from barbershop about 2 paces into the realm of the green chypre. Spectacular transition! The coumarin, initially so closely held to the lavender and musk, joins hands with the moss, and turns around to look at you with a laughing smile.

    Another spectacular, underestimated fragrance I discovered in the "Unsung Treasures" forum. Sensationally inexpensive, potent, long-lasting and easy to wear as an everyday fragrance.

    08 September, 2011 (Last Edited: 11th September, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    1000 by Jean Patou

    I've tried the EDP of 1000 a couple of times, and I always love the dark topnotes, but it's the EDT that I love from start to finish. There is a creaminess to the EDP that is less distinctive than the sharpness of the EDT. This keenness binds the florals and woods tightly. The layers, really more floral than woody at the start, are densely arranged, but evenly organized. Like the crisp pages of a brand new hardcover book the first time you thumb through it.

    There's just enough civet, just enough indole. They don't take the lead, they modulate the tone of the florals. They're just present enough to add complexity while not standing out as identifiably discrete notes. From the opening through drydown, 1000 is utterly coherent, and despite others' characterizations of old-school, old lady perfumery, I find it mysterious. I think the, Is it a floral? Is it a chypre? question 40 years later reflects its complexity and wonderfully baffling personality.

    1000 is more upright than uptight, more toned than starched. Some perfumes shout, some whisper seductively. 1000 simply speaks very clearly and intends to be heard whether it is fully understood or not.

    08 September, 2011 (Last Edited: 24 September, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Champs-Elysées by Guerlain

    Starts off with competing notes of a shallow but sharp sweetness and an insecticide-floral. They merge for a bit, then the insecticide (which I'd hoped would win) gives way to a sweet, bland floral. It's blaring, though. It's like sitting near a very loud conversation in a language you don't understand. You can't escape the volume, but you haven't the least idea what's actually going on. It comes at you from every angle, but isn't intriguing. While it hits a number of strong tones, sweet, floral, bright (fluorescent) metallic, it becomes tiresome very quickly.

    I find CE very off-putting, but I must admit that this type of perfume isn't my bag and I have trouble here distinguishing between what doesn't appeal to me and what is in fact unsuccessful overall. Cautious neutral rating.

    08 September, 2011 (Last Edited: 24 September, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Ferré by Gianfranco Ferré

    Smelling Ferré is like visualizing imaginary pale purple ribbons trailing from your wrists as you carry this scent into the world. It finds the common angle of iris, woods, berries, aldehydes, musks. It shows a textbook evolution with the tight yet extravagant range of its topnotes moving to a compressed woody-floral drydown with a surprising resemblance of construction, if not scent, to the drydown of Patou's 1000. Throughout the evolution from top to base, Ferré continues to suggest its purple hue, but because of its tight focus feels like a stripe rather than a large swath of color.

    For those who love the pretty-boy aspect of Dior Homme, Ferré is one assured step further in that direction.

    08 September, 2011 (Last Edited: 24 September, 2011)

    Notreveh's avatar

    Brazil Brazil

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Jazz by Yves Saint Laurent

    Jazz opens up with some spices mixed with an herbal tone making possible to sense an acid aroma which thankfully doesn't last a long time.

    After about 5 minutes, bergamot kicks in giving a citric chord to this fragrance which combined with a gorgeous floral heart, makes this a very clean and peaceful fragrance that projects good enough and stays for quite a good time on skin as well.

    08 September, 2011 (Last Edited: 03 October, 2011)

    Bartlebooth's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Estée Super by Estée Lauder

    This is a review of the original Super Perfume. I was bequeathed a 15cc bottle of this earlier this year, and despite now having the consistency of motor oil, it has lasted the 42 years since its purchase remarkably well. The notes are consistent with the current EDP edition, just richer and obviously more potent. A single dab lasts a full day with virtually no diminishment of quality.

    The opening is typically Lauder, with the trademark aldehyde marker being strong, and heralding in an array of strident florals. Lily, carnation and rose notes attach a bitterness that remains throughout, but it’s not dominant, more of backdrop. I am often wary of tuberose because any excess leads to an awful cloying sensation, but here it emerges from the flora creating softness in a supremely serene drydown.

    It is easy to see Super as the template for many subsequent Lauder fragrances, but I don’t see that they have ever topped this. Simply stellar

    08 September, 2011 (Last Edited: 29 October, 2011)

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Carillon Pour Un Ange by Tauer

    Carillon pour un Ange hits me like an olfactory epiphany. It is utterly captivating, ravishing. I can't stop taking long, slow inspirations of it.

    There are the notes, the muguet (earthy, oily, creamy, strangely autumnal) so distinct from the light, pretty muguets I've smelled before. The muguet is the lead-in to the leather, the fresh, piercing green, and the vaguely composted forest brown. But it's really the tones, not the notes. I get a strong musical sense of a precise, high-pitched harmony and a series of bass chords that obviate the need for a middle range. The high and the low pitches create a particular, perfect balance.

    Artists' quotes for press releases, like after-show discussion with directors/choreographers/composers make me want to bolt for the exit. Show me your work, don't try to talk me into it. Refreshingly different, Andy Tauer's humble statements to the effect of, 'This my tribute to the lily of the valley. I hope you'll dig it' (my paraphrase) makes me appreciate his work all the more.

    Artistically significant and breath-takingly beautiful. From my experience of the arts, not a common enough occurrence.

    08 September, 2011 (Last Edited: 05 April, 2012)

    Swanky's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Équipage by Hermès

    Unlike so many fragrances, this one seems perfectly named. The scent evokes the leather goods one might associate with old-money livery: the leather seating in a coach, riding boots, horse bridles, gloves. Leather is not indicated as a note, but it's definitely in what I am smelling.

    Perfectly judged, too, is the fragrance within. The subtle floral produced by the carnation and the mildly smoky woods (birch tar?) that produce at least a hologram of leatheriness result in an apotheosis of traditional European masculinity and refinement. This is one of the greats that has the added enticement of being rather unique. If you want a classic, classy men's gift idea, look no further. Projection is modest but omnipresent and longevity is superb for such a nuanced fragrance.

    08 September, 2011 (Last Edited: 17 October, 2012)

    silentrich's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    La Nuit de L'Homme by Yves Saint Laurent

    Have to say this is one of the most over rated fragrances I've come across. I was expecting a seductive fragrance with spices and a quality vanilla at it's base. What I got was very little spice, a big dose of the original L'homme, and a cookie cutter vanilla. I know people really like this, but I can think of quite a few fragrances in the same vein that do a much better job. Even worse is the amount of flankers this line spawns. I knew this line was bad when they made an EdP version of La Nuit which was worse than the EdT. That says a lot.

    08 September, 2011 (Last Edited: 22 January, 2013)

    Francop's avatar

    Spain Spain

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Just Grapefruit by Arran Aromatics

    I have been wearing this scent during the whole Summer 2011 in most of its available products: shower gel, shampoo, body lotion, face wash, body butter, eau de toilette and have even enjoyed the candle range.

    The whole line is really exquisite and worthwhile travelling around the globe of Basenotes...

    The scent consists of zesty lemon and grapefruit notes which are refreshing and very uplifting; longevity and sillage are moderate but considering the price and generous sizes of all their products you can't complain really...

    Thumbs up!

    08 September, 2011 (Last Edited: 09 November, 2013)

    Notreveh's avatar

    Brazil Brazil

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Moschino Friends Men by Moschino

    This one starts out with a blast of citrus (the strongest I have ever came across) with the aroma of mandarin dominating the entirely opening, but not a pure mandarin, instead, a salty one, similar to the salinity in coastal regions. Anyway, a very potent fragrance, which becomes acceptable only after about 2 hours, where a semi-sweet chord appears and the opening notes decay a little bit.

    Definitely leaned towards citrus-lovers.

    09 September, 2011

    Sunsetspawn's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Comme des Garçons 2 by Comme des Garçons

    There's a bitter citrus peel smell that seems to be fairly dominant in the accord, and it reminds me of Terre d'Hermes, but in TdH the accord smells more like pickle scratch-n-sniff. I also smell a potent waxiness which I suppose is the aldehydes, but I'm not really sure.

    Other than that, this is damn near impossible to describe, which I suppose is why people are throwing around the word "ink." Perhaps this is due to CdG2 being more synthetic, or perhaps the intent was for the smell to be a little more "like nothing before," or perhaps a bit of both.

    Although unique, my overall impression is just one of "meh."

    09 September, 2011

    HouseofCreed's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Curve for Men by Liz Claiborne

    Not bad, a nice cheap fragrance that has moderate longevity. I get a lot of citrus in the opening but then takes on a woodsy feel. It's inoffensive and cheap, however there are much better fragrances.

    09 September, 2011

    sacredsystem's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Tobacco Vanille by Tom Ford

    A sensual and inviting fragrance that is more than just tobacco and vanilla. The more you wear it, the more you realize how deep and complex this gem really is. Simply delicious! Tom Ford's Private Collection is simply fantastic.

    09 September, 2011

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Erolfa by Creed

    I don't know the Creed line very well. I've been sampling them fairly randomly lately. Scorecard: Really like Irisia (bought it.) Had to try Love in White after having read Luca Turin's review. (More to follow.) Original Vetiver, Himalaya and now Erolfa. These three are all of a piece for me. They're quite similar in overall shape and could easliy have been three submissions to the same client brief requesting a fresh men's scent of the broad mid 90s - mid 2000s style. You know, easily recognizable as a fresh, fruity, 'ozonic' masculine (ie. generic) but with its own name and a narrative/description/fantasy that gives the appearance of comparative distinction (ie. mine's better than yours.) Here is the disjointed dance of the contempo-masculine. A blanket, clannish similarity balanced with the appearance (but not the fact) of distinctiveness.

    So, Erolfa. Melony, buzzy. Aquatic and ozonic (two words that, so far as I can tell, have no intrinsic meaning in fragrance, but have gained descriptive value through repitition.) Not much different, therefore not much better or worse than many others of its time.

    There. I've offended the Creed fans. Now, to Luca Turin. Erolfa could just as easily have been a response to the client brief that gave us Beyond Paradise for Men. They are remarkably similar, varying in exactly the contempo-masculine manner described above. To Creed's credit, Erolfa came only four years after its step-uncle Cool Water, but twelve before BP for Men.

    09 September, 2011

    Showing 241 to 270 of 975.