Reviews of L'Heure Bleue by Guerlain

    Find out more about L'Heure Bleue by Guerlain in the Basenotes Fragrance Directory


    Showing 1 to 30 of 128.
    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Genre: Floral Oriental

    The olfactory equivalent of a sigh. Powdery, floral, moderately indolic, and unabashedly "perfumey," L'Heure Bleue is an archetypical classic women's fragrance. The white flowers here are spiked with a bittersweet, somewhat sharp, and (yes,) nocturnal flourish that seems to evoke a melancholic reverie in some wearers.

    Unfortunately, for all its transporting beauty and emotional power, L'Heure Bleue seems not to have aged well. Whenever I smell it I'm left feeling that it's somehow stuck in its own time, and not all that relevant to modern life. It is a scent that I admire, but do not enjoy.

    19 June, 2014

    comerio28's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    I used to wear this many years ago (back in the 80's). i liked it then. However, something changed in me or it because I can't wear it anymore. I find it too sweet for me now.

    24 May, 2014

    ClaireV's avatar

    Ireland Ireland

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    L'Heure Bleue is a victim of my unrealistically high expectations. I pored over all the reviews I could get my hands on, fell hook, line, and sinker for the poetic descriptions, and stupidly bought into a vision of the scent as romantic, nostalgic, tragic, and ultra-feminine. I spent a great deal of money and time in tracking down the current EDP version. I went over the review in the Guide, again and again. Without ever having tried the scent, I somehow "knew" that this was the one, and that my soul would cry out in relieved recognition when I put it on.

    What a load of buzzcocks. This is quite bad. I have tried it again and again, each time hoping for a different result, for the storm clouds to part and reveal the beauty and mystery of which everyone speaks. It never happens. The scent goes on with a thick, cloying violet-blue smell of marzipan, violets, and cloves, which many have described to be pastry-like - but I disagree with that definition. With pastry, even if you don't have a sweet tooth, you can at least appreciate the myriad of textures and sensations in your mouth/nose, for example, the crisp yielding of the pastry shell as you bite into it, the cool and creamy custard inside, the chewy nubbiness of rum-soaked raisins, the pleasing spikiness of aromatics used, like anise or cinnamon or clove, and the dustiness of the powdered sugar on top.

    So, let me be clear - the opening two hours of L'Heure Bleue has none of the contrasting textures of a pastry. Rather, the sensation is like a big wall of blue-purple-violet fudge coming at you - all dense, thick, and relentless smooth and play-dough like in texture. Like fudge, after the first gooey bite you start to wish for something to break up the monotonous drone of sweetness and thickness: it never comes. The scent is overwhelmingly of almond paste, violets, and cloves/carnations - all notes that are very loud and overbearing in isolation in perfumes, and here you have all three of those bully boys in one go.

    I will confess that it gets less obnoxious as it goes on. The sweetness banks down quite a bit. But all I am left with is a blue velvet sweetness on my skin, still devoid of any variation, development, or contrasting tones. It lasts an awful long time, and for me, quite unbearably so. L'Heure Bleue is a painting of a Madonna and Child, done thickly in bright, sticky, unctuous oil paints, with daubs of blue and violet and purple slathered on, one on top of another, and seems as childishly simple like all the paintings before Caravaggio - devoid of the light-and-shade contrasts (chiaroscuro) that he discovered and used to such great effect. L'Heure Bleue, as much as I would love to love it, has none of the chiaroscuro that is required to give depth and perspective. What's true in art is also true for perfume.

    You may all flay me alive now....

    12 May, 2014

    babsbendix's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    L'Heure Bleue is one permanent side of my own perfume Venn Diagram, and most any scent I end up falling for will share something significant with it - perhaps a resolved-yet-odd juxtaposition of notes; austerity; powdery softness; the absence of all tartness; candied violets; a cool/warm duality.

    It wasn't always like this. Though long a Guerlain fan, I will admit that I prefer the reformulated EDP! I understand that this may be a travesty, yet the older version was just slightly too ugly-beauty for me to fully embrace often. I find the newer version still smells entirely like L'Heure Bleue, yet there's more air in the room. I don't mean that it's weaker, or its longevity bad, just that its presence is gentler and more welcoming, more Japanese meditation incense than curious medicine now.

    I think others have remarked that it's Guerlain's most Eastern scent, despite not having been marketed like that, and I agree. I have a Japanese iron teapot that I use every day, have done for the past 20 years. L'Heure Bleue has the same kind of enduring, quiet, soulful beauty as that teapot, very wabi-sabi.






    11th May, 2014

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    This is one of the very few "classics" I still do not get to appreciate much. A soapy, beautiful, classic chypre stuffed with great powdery iris, a medicinal cloves/eugenol side, and... that vanillin/almond/marzipan feel I really can not stand. I suspect it's from fava tonka and vanillin but I am not sure as it's more complex and more cloying. It is just too much for me. I feel the similarities with Mitsouko, which instead is far more aerial, multifaceted, uncomparably more beautiful. I admit I have a "problem" with this kind of almondy/sweet aromas, and I am perhaps over-sensitive about them, so sometimes I feel "too much of it" when there's perhaps just a close hint of them... but still, I feel a ton of this sticky, thick and cloying accord from the very beginning. And I just can not help - I can not stand it. For me this accord just ruins this blend so bad, it makes it suffocating and smell "wrong" in a way I can not explain better. A sort of old-smelling, half gourmand, half medicinal feel. I don't know how to situate it exactly – I just know I feel this palpable prominent accord I do not like, despite all the efforts I make to focus on other aspects (which are great, indeed) of this scent. Luckily there's Mitsouko and Jicky!

    5/10

    28 April, 2014

    rogalal's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    This is more of a story than a review, but about 5 years ago, when I first discovered Basenotes, I was confused that Guerlain, a company I'd never heard of at the malls where I'd shopped, seemed to be considered the most important house in perfumery. This led me to the San Francisco Guerlain boutique where, with newbie enthusiasm, I walked in and said "I collect scents and I've read that you're the best - Can you show me what the big deal is about Guerlain?" Lucky for me, I had chanced upon Josie, the legendary SF Guerlain rep at the time, who took me at my word and expounded the joys of Guerlain. I walked out with a bottle of Cologne du 68 and little samples of pretty much everything I'd liked.

    She also made me a little decant of L'Heure Bleue extrait, and said "I know you didn't really like this one, but you will eventually. When you're ready, you'll understand that this is the best perfume here for you." Realizing that I had possibly just met a true perfume Jedi, I set about trying to love L'Heure Bleue.

    For years, I found it powdery and confusing, kind of like dough - bready but inedible. Eventually, I smelled the chemical methyl ionone (the doughy suede smell) and part of L'Heure Bleue fell into place. Feeling a little more grounded, I started to appreciate it, especially the way the ionones mixed with vanilla and iris and all sorts of greens and ambers to form possibly the best expression of the legendary Guerlinade base.

    Then, just recently, I smelled it again and it was like fireworks went off. For the first time, I smelled the sandalwood. It's everywhere in there, like a shifting river filling in all the impossibly intricate spaces left by everything I'd smelled before. It was like I'd been hearing an opera in another language, appreciating its technical beauty without really understanding it, and then suddenly comprehending all the words and truly connecting with it. Even so, it has mysteries I haven't even realized are there yet - just reading the other reviews before writing this was the first time I'd had my attention called to the carnation.

    L'Heure Bleue is one of the reasons I think of perfume as fine art. Even though my focus is usually on the smells themselves, there's a whole world of symbolism and depth in here as well. I'm so glad I took the time to fall in love with L'Heure Bleue, and I suppose my advice is to not write off confusingly complex perfumes that are over your head. Instead, if you have reason to believe they're worth the effort, try to climb up and reach their level...

    31st March, 2014

    Captain's avatar

    Canada Canada

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    L'Heure Bleue is sweet, woody, powdery and spicy. It's a gorgeous and masterful carnation scent, so much peppery carnation. The cloves give a slightly medicinal aspect which isn't a bad thing, it just works. The purple flowers add powder but don't overwhelm, it's so well balanced. Lovely, I adore it. Like Mitsouko and Shalimar, it's a masterpiece, nothing else like it.

    As for the comments that this scent is depressing...what a powerful thing marketing can be. Proof positive it was alive and well in 1912 people. Pretty sure the marketing reflected prewar European malaise and has nothing to do with the scent itself.

    06 December, 2013 (Last Edited: 20th January, 2014)

    Mimi Gardenia's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Mystical cool -warm Scent

    L'Heure Bleue is a fantastic original fragrance even after reformulation.

    The vintage L'Heure Bleue was deeper, a little more ambery and animalic , richer and had more nuances, folds and layers to me.

    But we live in 2013 and the current offering in extrait and in EDP is still excellent. it is more modern, less nuanced but still is L'Heure Bleue . Especially in the top notes , you cannot mistake this for anything else.

    Cool anise, bergamot , neroli ,violet, carnation , orange blossom rose create something cool and medicinal , powdery yet rich , classic and to some ...dated. To me , it is nostalgic and classical . Add Tonka and vanilla plus amber in the dry down and created is a soft, yet emotional and powerful fragrance . I am not sure if there is any oakmoss left in the modern extrait. It is a terribly unique scent . A cool start leading to warmer, loving and gentle end. L'Heure Bleue was constructed with love and inspiration.

    I feel the modern version of the extrait shares much of current Vol de Nuit's dry down .

    Excellent in Extrait and EDP. I have vintage as well but I actually prefer the modern version now. The vintage hits harder and is much deeper, has oakmoss I am sure ...but the modern stuff is more diffusive , lasts longer on me and I prefer it. The dry down of vintage L'heure Bleue reminds me of the dry down of vintage Mitsouko - . Anyway ....L'heure Bleue today is unmistakenly Guerlain .

    Sylvaine Delacourte's favorite Guerlain scent .

    Pros: Classic, emotive, beautiful
    Cons: None"

    27 September, 2013

    LCasimiro's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    I bought my EDP yesterday after trying it on my skin several weeks ago. Today I wore it all day and I am in love. This scent takes me back to a simpler time. As a teenager I adored carnation based scents - L'Air du Temps was my favorite but I also loved White Shoulders and later Anais Anais. As an adult I love vanilla based scents. L'Heure Bleue combines these two aspects in one lovely fragrance. If I have a complaint it is that I do not get longevity from this scent. I have reapplied three times today. The upside to this is that I get to experience the slightly spicy opening multiple times :) I think I see an atomizer of LHB in my future!

    Update 02/25/14: I was looking for a something else and came across a box of old perfume samples from the early 80's. I started looking through them and the name Guerlain jumped out at me. I slowly turned the bottle and almost dropped it when I realized it said L'Heure Bleue Parfum. My husband thought I hurt myself because I started screaming "Oh my God! Oh my God!" I couldn't open it, my hand was shaking so much. He opened it for me and I put a small amount on the back of my hand. It smells wonderful - the opening isn't as sharp as the current formulation and the dry down is heavenly. I never thought I'd be so fortunate to smell the original perfume.

    29 April, 2013 (Last Edited: 26 February, 2014)

    Bal a Versailles's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Help me understand. When I spray myself with the wee beastie that is LHB I get the rubber tyre that Bvlgari Black is supposed to exude, or extrude, or whatever diesel on the tracks smells like. After an hour or so I begin to sniff my wrist and wonder what sort of burnouts got me here. It's nice but there is melancholia lurking nearby. Is LHB the 'little match girl' of perfumery? The cold descending, the jaw aching pity of it all, the match striking and burning out, then another, then another. That's what I think of...alongside the Velveteen Rabbit, the saddest, most tearjearking story of them all. I've never owned a bottle.

    24 April, 2013

    scentreview's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Unfortunately, many of the Guerlains are no-go's for me simply because carnation doesn't play nicely with my skin chemistry. On me, L'Heure Bleue turns into a flourescent carnation screech within mere minutes. It becomes bright and synthetic, suffocating.

    My dog won't stay in the room when I test this one. A discriminating nose, to be sure.

    Mitsouko works better for me, as does Apres L'Ondees. Forget Shalimar or L'Heure Bleue.

    01st April, 2013

    iivanita's avatar

    Croatia Croatia

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    It took me a while until i got through some notes, after exploring all clove and carnation type of scents i finally realised this is strong clove-carnation composition, that odd sweet smell, that some say is honey comes from that very special note, that's spicy as well and adds that something extra to every composition,something old fashioned ( Tabu) or better say old school perfumery

    Here it is mixed with beautiful yet very subtle damascena rose and powdery , dry make up iris note:-) , the same kind of things one can find in modern guerlains( shalimar initial)

    I like that powdery iris dry down, and think as well as iris is common note in many Chanels Exclusifs...in Guerlain perfumes its there from an old age, and is more like voluptuous, dense,makeup kind of iris, which i prefer much more to diffusive ,soapy ,radiating iris note.

    Lovely.

    15 March, 2013

    Cricketkitty's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    I am really trying to like this fragrance but if you have to try that hard then its not worth it right? I smell it and I cannot find what all the noise is about. It doesn't really smell bad but doesn't smell like perfume either. I'll give it one more try.....

    03 September, 2012

    Tinyreddragonfly's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    I've worn it for 57 years as a nighttime winter scent. I keep it in stock...seal broken but capped and let it age for years before I use it. Originally Guerlain advertised this fragrance as coming from Bulgarian Roses and Star Jasmine. Time and again friends buy it then say it doesn't smell the same on them....so I like it even more! Shalimar also deepens with age.

    28 May, 2012

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


     


    Buttery and mossy neroli, honey and the royal opacity of the eminent iris. This regal fragrance is the silkier and more romantic Mitsouko's cousin. If Mitsouko embodies the mystery, l'Heure Bleue impersonates the romanticism. This fragrance is an historical archetype of discreet and ethereal elegance. The dry down is rosey, corporeal, musky, soapy and powdery. Sublime.

    24 May, 2012

    LiveJazz's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    This is the most dramatic of the esteemed trio of early 20th century Guerlain classics, the others being Shalimar and Mitsouko, of course. Shalimar is the darkly beautiful stunner. Mitsouko is the eclectic. L'Heure Bleue is the somewhat moody drama student, who is quite stunning herself, but doesn't intentionally draw attention to her beauty, as there are other things to attend to.

    L'Heure opens with a distinct bready/pastry note that reminds me of the slightly yeasty opening of Mitsouko, but in a more dessert-like form, due to the anise and a note reminiscent of almond butter. Plush, somewhat indolic florals create a powdery makeup-like backdrop, and envelop the opening in a light animalic cloak which is a strangely "cool" and medicinal, as opposed to the furry warmth of most animalic scents.

    There is a hint of melancholy here, but I do not find that it dominates the scent. Perhaps a sad event has happened, and this is acknowledged by that dusty, wilted, almost decaying note that is more obvious in Mitsouko, but here the message seems to be to keep calm and carry on, and try to enjoy the little things. Have a pastry.

    Despite the hint of melancholy, it is a very bright opening overall, and its utterly unique notes are felt well into the heart, as more traditionally florientall powdery notes begin to dominate. Even then, this is a cool, aloof powder, likely due to the relatively strong presence of iris. Never does L'Heure Bleue lose its character. It just seems to relax on the skin: the indoles dampen, the make-up and pastry note becomes a delicious memory.

    The overall sense of coolness never leaves entirely, but it feels natural despite the ordinarily warm oriental structure. Instead of being cozily nested by the fire on a winter night, L'Heure Bleue is out wandering in streets, feeling the prick of the cold against her face, but not really noticing, because she is pondering some deep thought.

    Unisex. Great longevity and sillage. Exquisite creation.

    07 November, 2011

    LadyDragonFire's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Interestingly I don't find this perfume to be really depressing and I'm a little surprised at all the people who say that their mood is instantly dragged down by it! Mind you, I have heard that some people believe there is a connection between fragrance and "color season." They say that certain people are "dragged down" by certain colors too. (sky blue actually drains my energy and makes me feel depressed.) So I can imagine that smells can have the same effect. Plus, the sense of smell is also supposed to be the one sense that is mostly closely linked to memories, and therefore triggers memories very easily. All of these things could easily explain why so many people say they are depressed by this perfume.
    Interestingly, they say that Queen Elizabeth II wears L'Heure Bleue. Supposedly her personality type is ISFJ. I am also an ISFJ, and I also don't mind this perfume. You may have to have that personality type to really like this. :)
    That said, I still kind of think I might prefer Shalimar and/or Mitsouko to this perfume. I like the powdery notes in L'Heure Bleue but when it dries down pretty much all I can smell is a very sweet amber fragrance which I might get tired of after a while. I definitely get fed up with the extreme sweetness of Samsara. Mind you, I think this smells a bit better than Samsara, but I'm still not sure if I would buy a whole bottle of this.

    12 October, 2011

    Kuttykutty's avatar

    Sweden Sweden

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    I bought a vintage EDT bottle of L'heure Bleue at a flea market last week. I didn't really expect to want to wear it, but I thought it would look nice in my collection. I was pleasantly surprised by this gorgeous fragrance. Even though the bottle is nearly half a century old and it being an EDT, it is still very potent, and I love its deep, powerful and almost spiritual scent.

    10th October, 2011

    testa_maura's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    It used to be my absolute favourite since I was nineteen, I was fascinated by a miraculous fragrance, its unique personality and the strong sense of the epoque. Nothing could be even compared with it, my first and strongest love. I was spending my bottle drop by drop, years passed, I was growing older and so was the perfume, older but never obsolete. A friend of mine made me a gorgeous gift, bringing a new bottle from the Guerlain store in Paris; I opened it impatiently and tried immediately; now I'm literally in tears - what the hell have they done to a genuine miracle?! This cheap sweetness, where it comes from? What's wrong with their noses? I'm sure mine doesn't lie to me: it's a fraud, it has NOTHING to do with my beloved perfume, it's a street whore stealing the crown and the name. L'heure bleue is dead, R.I.P. I'll never buy one again.

    07 October, 2011

    Zut's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Of course, L'heure bleue is kind of sweet and powdery. A mixture of carnation, iris, tonka, benjoin, tuberose and vanilla with just a hint of anise will do that. Nevertheless, this great Guerlain classic has a lot of class and personality. As much as I hate the "gourmand" perfumes à la Thierry Mugler, I love L'heure bleue with a passion. Obviously, not every one can handle such a rich fragrance but those who can will make some heads turn.

    06 September, 2011

    adorabella's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    I became interested in LHB because my favorite author, Jean Rhys, was said to love this fragrance. For those who are not familiar with her, she lived in early 1900s Paris and would've known the original formulation.

    For me, LHB is the most depressing fragrance I have ever worn and owned. Ever. I am literally instantly depressed when I wear LHB so I avoid it, but still own it because of its historic significance and because Jean Rhys loved it. LHB should come with a depression warning because it really is that bad, "can cause extreme depression in some individuals..." I know a lot of people like it and am glad it works for them, but when I've worn it I am somehow transported to the most depressing place and mood. Some have described LHB as a melancholy fragrance and I find that to be an apt descpription. I have recently discovered Insolence and find this to be an infinitely more wearable granddaughter of LHB.

    04 September, 2011

    jtd's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Describing Vol de Nuit once, I said I can't analyze or dissect the classic Guerlains. This holds true for l'Heure Bleue. I get an anise-like vanilla and orange blossom, but it seems like one of those immensely complex orientals of its era. Beyond my analytical skills. Still, it is my favorite of the classic Guerlains. It's been described as melancholic, moody, shadowy. Maybe this is a distinction without a difference, but for me it's less about affect or emotion than it is about a contemplative state. I tend toward reflection when I wear l'HB.

    I find the simple prettiness of l'HB always affecting. This prettiness, sort of beauty on a low flame, burns its way into you. Capital-B Beauty with its drama might infatuate for a moment, a day. But l'HB's attractiveness entices over time. L'HB has no gloss, but looking at its matte finish over time, you come to realize it's your favorite color.

    29 July, 2011 (Last Edited: 22 August, 2011)

    Fleurine's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    L'Heure Bleue is a treasure from Paris during La Belle Epoque that pre-dates penicillin.
    It's simple magic it will lure you back to a different time, at once less complex but somehow more sophisticated, where you can relax and dream. It is, however, Perfume with a capital P, and has a take no prisoners sort of feel. I found it familiar somehow, even on the first smelling.
    If you are open to it's magic, you may like it. Maybe even love it.

    05 July, 2011

    blood-orange's avatar

    Australia Australia

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    It's quite intimidating to write a review on one of the world's most famous and well-regarded perfumes. Guerlain's earlier fragrances are all hailed as classics, even though many are hard to find these days.

    When I managed to track down L'Heure Bleue, I was both eager and a little nervous based on my expectations and what I had previously heard or read. The first thing I noted, was that it had a very distinct Guerlain vibe about it.

    Both Shalimar and L'Heure Bleue share similarities in the top notes. Personally, I believe they both smell like calamine lotion and face powder. This however is not intended to be a negative remark on either fragrance. I find L'Heure Bleue both enticing and unique.

    This fragrance certainly radiates a certain sense of maturity and class. In my opinion, it's not something that will suit everyone. It's very difficult to pin-point any particular notes here, as they all blend together to create a powdery and dusty floral with an elegant, old-fashioned aura.

    L'Heure Bleue is very 'French'. You'd most likely feel silly wearing this fragrance with a t-shirt, jeans and a pair of flip flops. I'd have to be decked out in an elegant gown with Tiffany diamonds before I'd feel worthy of wearing L'Heure Bleue.

    In some instances the rose, jasmine, ylang-ylang and vanilla tend to rise up from the powdery-ness to make their presence known, yet as I said before, this is one well-blended fragrance with no definitive notes. Both the EDT and EDP last considerably well, and the accompanying lotion adds that special touch. I'm actually more tempted to splurge on the lotion rather than the fragrance itself.

    The smoothness, sophistication and beauty of L'Heure Bleue is difficult to surpass. 'The Blue Hour' as it has been aptly named, has the ability to capture almost anyone with its binding spell.

    30th June, 2011

    GalaBrand's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    I was so desperate to try this after hearing so much about it. I too wanted to wander the back streets of Paris just as evening descended.

    However, after spraying myself I was then subjected to an hours train journey alone with it. Well I say alone, I emptied the carriage! This claustrophobic, cloying scent gave me and probably everyone within 200m a terrible headache. Its just screamed PERFUME.
    I was forced to sit and suffer enveloped in my pariah fog of suffocating baby powder and violent vanilla flowers who assaulted me all the way home. Instead of going out I jumped straight in a cab home, head hanging out of the window all the way, and jumped straight in the bath to scrub it off. Despite my best efforts the smell remained and so did the headache. A change of clothes and a further shower later I fell exhausted into bed, promising to have a few days off smelling anything!

    The next morning I was horrified to discover I could still smell it, it was everywhere, last nights clothes and everything they had touched had to be washed, as did my towels and bedsheets. But the memory remains… never again. Sorry to its many fans but it’s a no from me.

    Could you wear it with a hangover? Honey, this GAVE me a hangover!

    08 June, 2011

    gabyvinki's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Yes you can love or hate it or do not like it. But there s one thing you simply CANNOT do:
    Denying that it IS a masterpiece, masterfully created by The Old great Perfumers of the world!!
    L'Heure Bleue is perfume art as good as it gets. If you are going through the whole range of the best selling mainstream perfumes (or nearly the whole) and thereafter you go through the whole range of the best selling niche perfumes I can assure you your nose is trained!:) And then you will realize that L'heure Bleue is a kind of its own. All the parts fit so well in together it is like a symphony that will stay with you the whole day after only one spritz or dap of the pure perfume. It is so gorgeous , words can really not do it justice. It will haunt you if you like it or not, it s that good! Finally, finally I have found my "holy gral" within the fragrance world...:) Thanks to the old masters of GUERLAIN

    31st May, 2011

    Ralph's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    That this sits beside Jicky and Mitsouko is astonishing. I don't know if this has suffered from a reformulation or if tastes themselves have reformulated what's acceptable for the 'modern' palate - but, either way, this is just too much. Too much sweet marzipan and aniseed; too much lurid, migraine-making, *blue* somehow; too much Parma Violet; too much like a plug-in room 'frangrancer'.

    03 May, 2011

    Red Theodora's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    So, it seems many people find L'Heure Bleue out-of-date, old-fashioned - grandmotherly. Well, that's fine with me! I am an old-fashioned girl and one of the most hopeless of romantics; and L'Heure Bleue suits me to a tee. The sweet orange blossom top, that registers for mere moments; and the whollup of violets and carnation at the heart are wrapped up at the drydown with a soft, fluffy vanilla bow. It's an elegant and refined package that I'm always anxious to open.

    30th April, 2011

    alfarom's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    I must confess! I don't like L'Heure Bleue. While it's unquestionably relevant for its historical meaning and influence, at the same time it's badly aged. I've been trying this perfume countless times, but I've never been able to really appreciate it. It has a sweet buttery-like, almost gourmand opening that's absolutely obsolete, and even if it's not its fault it suffer from becoming an archetipal female fragrance.

    08 April, 2011 (Last Edited: 09 April, 2011)

    Charles Of The Ritz's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    I own prewar ( 1933 ) parfum and contempory EDP and even now they both smell very very similar .This is the type of fragerance that you either love or hate I absolutely adore this masterpiece The EDP HAS to be worn on the skin if you are a bloke.I have had many many complments over the years and YES a man can wear L Heure Bleue . Carefull as I said you either love it or hate it I would samle it first before I buy as you could be wasting your money and it is expensive gorgeous

    02 April, 2011 (Last Edited: 13 April, 2011)

    Showing 1 to 30 of 128.