Perfume Reviews

Neutral Reviews of Sacrebleu by Nicolaï

A raspberry floral girly scent. It's sweet and tasteful, but there is an aspect that will recall something from childhood...a candy, or medicine or something relying on the same red berry note. Lacks ambition.
01st February, 2011
I tried this scent a long time along and intially I really liked it...and after reading one of the posts from another poster I knew exactly what I did and didn't like about it! It has a note of Raspberry (somewhere in there!) but it's predominately an "incense-y" scent. This is definitely an older scent..I was in my late 20's when I tried it so it was way too old for me then and probably still too old for me now, approaching 40. Something you could picture smelling on your Grandmother. I'm not knocking it...it's just different and maybe that's why I like it!!
03rd December, 2010
Ever since I heard of this fragrance, I had imagined I would love this. From the cheeky name to the very thought of an incense-based fragrance created by the offspring of the grand Guerlain dynasty, I had conjured up an idea of my perfect fragrance. Ah, but as they say, try before you buy.

And so I did. The beginning of my test application was promising, with what struck me as a delicious licorice incense--although I can't quite define what note registered as licorice in my olfactory nerves. This delight was brief, though, as it soon settled into a rich and pretty (but neither beautiful nor sensuous) fruit jam.

This is not to say that Sacrebleu is not fine stuff--indeed it is--but that suggestions that this is an oriental rather than a straight-up floral are, I think, really wide of the mark, as there is nothing very spicy or woody here.

Being fifty-something, I confess I do find the constant dismissive references to "old-lady" fragrances irritating. Yet I must also confess that I had thoughts that Sacrebleu would be a fragrance I would give my mother (were she still living) as it is elegant and lovely but certainly not in the least bit sexy or as exciting as its exclamatory name would suggest. (Nor, for that matter, is there anything "sacre" about it.)

Three weeks after my first test, I tried Sacre Bleu a second time, using the remainder of the sample vial. Being trained to analyze, process, then analyze and process again, I was troubled by my inability to sort out just what I found unappealing about it before. The second test produced several additional thoughts. I kept thinking there was some childhood recollection in all this, but I couldn't place it. At first, I thought it was some sort of candy--the kind kids eat, not because it's good but because it's candy and it's there--and realized that Sacrebleu strikes me as more fruity than floral. (I'd been stumped before, trying to pin down a particular flower.) I could swear I smelled banana--more some strange banana/raspberry flavoured something or other--and I could smell the incense more clearly this time, though it was an incense far removed from the ecclesiastical variety one encounters in CdG Avignon or Heeley Cardinal.

And then it hit me. Not so much a childhood memory but a teenage one. By the end of the 60s and the beginning of the 70s, virtually every place that sold records--no matter how unhip--also sold incense. Not only the patchouli sort that automatically registers "hippy" in so many minds, but just about every scent imaginable....

Psychedelic raspberry incense! Mais oui!

SACRE BLEU! (Pardon my French, as my mother would say.)
09th June, 2010
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The long lasting top notes form a fizzy, spicy, fruity, floral accord. Sacrebleu exhibits very good quality raw materials and the typical superb Nicolaï attention to the movements and proportions of the fragrance. But when all is said and done, we are dealing here with a fruity / floral, and to my way of thinking, it’s pretty difficult to make anything outstanding out of the combination. This is a nice scent – the florals are well done and the fruit, black currant, was well chosen because it does not project that ultra sweet sillage that some other fragrances of this type tend to do.

Nicely done but it is missing that something special.

28th November, 2009
Just OK. Although it's sweet and faintly (femininely) floral there's enough jasmine here to make me feel that I could carry it off. To me Sacreblue smells like soapy jasmine bubblegum, not unlike many of the soap bars one can find in LUSH (handmade cosmetics chain store).
20th October, 2009 (last edited: 21st October, 2009)
The sacred tuberose in the first minute is really great but when jasmin which is not the best quality is added scent becomes somehow metalic. The second quality jasmin oils have this side scent; so does the ylang ylang and violets; a kind of bitter and disturbing metalic like note. Also the final scent is sour on me.
09th September, 2008
Another beautiful perfume from PdN! It is a kind of oriental floral gourmand with a spicy vanilla incense drydown that rivals Shalimar. In spite of that description, the scent is not too heavy-handed. I always receive compliments when I wear this and I always am eager to recommend Parfums de Nicolai. I like it best in the intense concentration. It isn't stronger; it simply lasts longer. PS Sadly, this has changed. It's initial jam note has been replaced by bubblegum sweetness.It is no longer spicy. It has lost it's incense drydown. Still pretty but not what it once was...
02nd August, 2008 (last edited: 16th December, 2010)
I just don't love this one like I thought I would. Ah...the search for the most wearable tuberose continues for me.

It reminds me of Children's Motrin, the liquid, at first. Fruity...pleasent. The tuberose and vanilla make a nice enterance in the drydown, but it is very soft, close to the skin, and the whole composition seems to sit very flat on me. The spice remains for quite a while. Pleasent...I will keep my sample and wear it casually. It just dosn't have the ooomph or sex appeal that I am demanding of my fragrances lately.

Notes are listed as:
black currant bud, peach blossom, jasmine, tuberose, vanilla, tonka bean, Yemenese incense
12th January, 2008
I just don't love this one like I thought I would. Ah...the search for the most wearable tuberose continues for me.

It reminds me of Children's Motrin, the liquid, at first. Fruity...pleasent. The tuberose and vanilla make a nice enterance in the drydown, but it is very soft, close to the skin, and the whole composition seems to sit very flat on me. The spice remains for quite a while. Pleasent...I will keep my sample and wear it casually. It just dosn't have the ooomph or sex appeal that I am demanding of my fragrances lately.

Notes are listed as:
black currant bud, peach blossom, jasmine, tuberose, vanilla, tonka bean, Yemenese incense
12th January, 2008