Reviews of Coromandel by Chanel

    Find out more about Coromandel by Chanel in the Basenotes Fragrance Directory


    Showing 1 to 30 of 64.
    Infini's avatar

    Wales Wales

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    I'm sorry, but this is the most awful perfume I have ever tried! Unbelievably sweet and sickly, this chocolate patchouli toffee biscuity creation nearly made me physically sick. I've realised I'm not a fan of Jacques Polge perfumes in general, (Chanel No18 being an exception) but Coromandel (along with Bel Respiro) is the the worst so far. It obviously has a lot of fans, but I can honestly say I have never smelled anything so sweet and nasty.

    27 July, 2014

    ClaireV's avatar

    Ireland Ireland

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    For me, this is at least as much about frankincense as it is about patchouli. I happen to love both patchouli and frankincense, so this just about fires up all of my pleasure synapses. The patchouli dominates (but never EVER strays into hippy territory - this is Chanel, after all), and the incense adds a lovely smokiness. They rise up off my skin in thick whorls of scent, alternating between earthy patchouli and celestial incense, and the whole thing comes off as bookish, serious, and spiritual.

    The opening is rather harsh and bitter, perhaps owing to the bitter oranges, and for a while I feel like I am wearing a tweed overcoat kindly offered to me by a man, with whiffs of some male muskiness and sharp cologne still lingering on the scratchy wool. That's good - I actually like the sensation of putting on something recently worn by a man - it smells both familiar and strange. The scent softens and sweetens progressively throughout, shedding the most butch elements of the start, but still retaining the air of maleness that I like so much.

    The green-brown earthiness of the patch, fierce at first, slowly starts to sink into a giant pillow of orris, vanilla, and woods, creating that sweet, creamy feel that Coromandel is justly famous for. White chocolate you say? Well, yes, I can smell it, or maybe it is the power of suggestion. I am highly suggestible. Patchouli generally feels chocolatey to my nose anyway. The overall feel, before the dry down that is, is one of rich, golden brown patchouli and gently smoking frankincense tears all whipped up into a cloud of sweet musks, vanilla and orris. It manages, by some trick I can't figure out, to be both powdery and buttery all at once.

    It's downright gorgeous: a rich-but-restrained, earthy, sexy, bosomy oriental that whispers (never shrieks) both comfort and high-end luxury. I would say it is a cashmere sweater type of scent except that I am not a cashmere sweater type of girl (I don't have the patience for all that hand washing), so let's just say instead that it is the perfume equivalent of drinking a bath tub sized mug of hot chocolate, spiked with Irish whiskey, on a cold, blustery day.

    The dry down is a woodsy, ambery affair that I've experienced elsewhere, including in (of all places!) that classic drugstore cheapy chypre La Perla! It's still lovely, although slightly less exciting than the top and heart notes. I love Coromandel and hope to always have a bit of it in my collection, because it's wonderful and also because it makes me like I am wearing that man's tweed overcoat.

    11th June, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Genre: Woody Oriental

    Coromandel is the patchouli entry in Chanel’s Les Exclusifs line, and was apparently composed by the new house perfumer Christopher Sheldrake. Sheldrake’s fingerprints are all over this scent, and I agree on the oft-observed resemblance to his previous Borneo 1834 for Serge Lutens. The two scents are very similar in their late stages, sharing as they do a fuzzy, if slightly generic, synthetic woody amber drydown. In neither case is this accord as crass or heavy as in say, Lolita Lempicka au Masculin or Guerlain Homme, but I would have liked something more original by way of basenotes, especially the second time around.

    Before it dries down Coromandel is a sweeter, spicier, and hence more approachable scent than Borneo 1843, the dusty patchouli-cocoa accord being softened by a creamy iris note. Between the extra sweetness, the texture of the iris, and the gentle spices, Coromandel borders closely on the gourmand, though it never quite ventures as far as “edible.” I attribute the inedible quality to a sharp, tangy edge on the patchouli. This piquancy is very noticeable up top, but persists well into the heart of the scent. If it lingered even longer it would make a wonderful counterweight to the somewhat flat woody amber in the drydown. Coromandel’s sillage and projection are contained as patchouli rich fragrances go, but it’s by no means a weak or stingy scent. While I’m not in love with it’s drydown, I imagine many others will be happier with it, and since the rest of the fragrance is rich and beautifully composed I have to rate Coromandel an overall success.

    11th June, 2014

    Captain's avatar

    Canada Canada

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Overly sweet, cloying, woody musk candy coated patchouli. I absolutely get the sweet, lacquered wood vibe that is intended from this scent, it’s pretty amazing. I don’t want to smell like lacquered wood though.

    I tried it in the winter with better results it still wasn't a firm thumbs up for me, I prefer the less sweet but very similar Prada Amber for women.

    04 June, 2014 (Last Edited: 05 June, 2014)

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Dark green earth patchouli and nothing else - hateful juice!

    15 April, 2014

    tigrushka's avatar

    Finland Finland

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Judging by the notes of and Noses behind this scent I expected to love it, but boy was I wrong! The opening blast of Coromandel felt almost painful, not only to nostrils but also palate, and the sweetish run-of-the-mill drydown wasn't much better. The overall impression was stagnant and "too cheap for a Chanel" (especially as it is not just a plain Chanel but an "exclusif"). I like my patchouli dirty and earthy, not sanitized like this.

    07 March, 2014

    Kain's avatar

    Iran Iran

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    While my first experience with Chanel exclusive line (Bois des Iles) was a completely disappointment, this one got my attention and I must admit it's a great fragrance!
    The opening is a warm, sweet,spicy and slightly smoky scent.
    The benzoin note create a warm, sweet and slightly resinous scent that is mixed with some incense note.
    The incense note is not that strong, but strong enough to give it a very light smoky aroma.
    There is also a spicy scent, something like cinnamon that beside those sweet and warm notes, create a strong and very sensual oriental scent.
    As time goes by, in the mid the magic happens!
    The spicy cinnamon like and incense notes settle down and white chocolate kick in.
    The white chocolate note mixed with benzoin and vanilla, create a sweet, yummy and extremely sensual scent. when you're hungry don't use this fragrance because you may eat your wrists!!!!
    The sweetness is more creamy and slightly sugary and it's really well balanced. it's not in your face and cloying at all.
    In the base, it's time for patchouli note to shine!
    In the base you can still smell that sweet white chocolate scent and now the patchouli note comes in and give it much more depth.
    The patchouli note give the scent slightly sharp, earthy and wet feeling and this combination remind me of "Thierry Mugler Angel" in many ways but much smoother.
    A great complex and sensual fragrance with very good projection and great longevity.
    Well done!

    16 February, 2014

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Coromandel opens with a thick, dense, black resinous sandalwood-incense accord, bitter and sticky, with a refined and brighter crown of vanillin-flowers notes (iris, violet, rose, all quite velvety and discreetly sensual). For a while it gets slightly and "far" close to some Kamali's Incense, or some Slumberhouse scents, or more obviously Sheldrake himself, at least for the resinous, oily-sticky "blackness" of the opening. A hint of fruits (almost rhubarb), a mysore sandalwood note and aldehydes. A base powdery creaminess of white musks, orris and ylang. Obscure and quite fascinating, it then progressively sweetens and softens as minutes pass, eventually settling on a mellow, soft, creamy-musky drydown comprising again sandalwood, a salty-metallic note, a balsamic breeze. The "Chanel touch" is the aldehydes accord, which gives the scent a metallic, powdery roundness, keeping it in a quite classic European chypre territory. Still it's globally a fresh (meaning "new") and unpredictable scent, fairly remarkable to be honest: mainstream enough, a bit glossy and restrained, but charming and well-executed. For mainstream lovers which want to add a touch of shade and "niche" to their collection.

    7,5/10

    15 January, 2014 (Last Edited: 28 May, 2014)

    promqueen's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Like a combination of Angel and Shalimar, only lighter and less jarring. Very nice drydown...a patchouli note that is not too heavy. Good longevity. The EDT lasts 8 hours on me

    08 November, 2013

    RichNTacoma's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Stunning

    Masculine? Feminine? Who cares anin.... This is an amazing scent. The frankincense is front and foremost on my skin, and it is wonderful. Reminds me a bit of Sahara Noir at first, but then becomes far more complex. I get rose, but there may not be any present. I also get cocoa in moments, it is not overpowering. It is sweet, but not coying to me, making it more of a spicy scent than a gourmand, although I get why some call it that.

    My only issue? I had very, very little to try, as I received the last wear from a very generous trading partner who said it was one of his favorite. I understand why; one of my tops and one I will have to get at some point. Stunning.

    27 September, 2013

    pavel's avatar

    Canada Canada

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Great frag.

    Chanel Les Exclusives Coromandel

    Coromandel reminds me of Saturday sauna at my Uncle's house decades ago. He had an old cedar sauna where he would pour equaliptus oil on the hot stones and whip the guests with birch branches for a massage. Later, we would drink herbal tea and eat chocolates.

    The effect was calming and intoxicating.

    The effect of Coromandel is calming and intoxicating. It conveys a feeling of having cognac and chocolates after a large meal. Coromandel is satiated, heavy, non transparent, luxurious, and rich.

    It is not a summer scent. There is a gravity to it that makes it perfect for the colder days when the sidewalks are covered with colourful, rotting leaves, and you have just pulled out your favourite sweater out of storage . I see it as the perfect scent to wear to a bar late on a cold night.

    It is a feminine scent which does not scream of sexuality. Instead, it whispers it. This is a scent for gentle, quiet, fall time romance. For whispers and meaningful glances. It could be worn by a man. I'd have to say that this is a scent best worn for yourself and those you love.

    24 August, 2013

    Gary F's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Stunning!

    Words cannot begin to express how much I love Coromandel, but I'll try. It's sweet and savory, classic and modern, sophisticated and easy going. I'm not sure that I have a signature scent, but if I could only wear one for the rest of my life, this would be it - without hesitation.

    Pros: Perfection in a bottle
    Cons: None - are you kidding me?!?

    20th June, 2013

    Noah2's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    After finally taking roughly an hour in the small Brompton Road Boutique in Knightsbridge deciding which scent to get, I went with Bois des Iles on the day, but I was so torn it seemed perhaps an hour wasn't enough time to make a final decision (as much as I love bois des Iles).

    I managed to get a sample Coromandel and got the SA to spray a card very heavily of it for me as I was already wearing BdI. Such a beautiful scent, initially undoubtedly feminine the florals dry down quite promptly and reveal a soft middle of amber, still holding on and blending smooth and masterfully into sandalwood and a vanilla. Which in my opinion smells equally as masculine.

    This is such a great fragrance I'm hoping to make it my next purchase (after another hour of smelling all the Les Exclusifs range). It's very calming, yet elegant, unisex and complex. Sweet, smooth and relaxed may not be for everyone, but this is a scent you cannot ignore even just to try.

    13 April, 2013

    's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    I almost have no words to describe Coromandel.

    Im about to say this is the most beautiful fragrance i've ever smelt.

    The patchouli is very well blended with benzoin and the result is a wonderful sweetness.

    The incense note is very light and gives it a nice depth.

    The opening may be a little harsh, but as it dries down the sweetness starts in a creamy way.

    Here again the comparisions are inevitable.

    While Montale Patchouli Leaves is more linear, Coromandel is much more a complex and well blended scent.

    While Borneo 1932 is raw, Coromandel is soft.

    In my opinion Borneo 1932 is an "unfinished" version of Coromandel.

    Sheldrake finished the job that had been already began and together with Polge created this beautiful composition.

    Definetely Coromandel is a piece of art. Masterpiece. Unique. Addictive.

    20th March, 2013

    iivanita's avatar

    Croatia Croatia

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    must rewrite my whole review, was neutral before, but it is thumbs up!

    i dont like patchouly as the main theme! but here its so nicely done! it has feminine side, opens up with bitter orange, patchouly-floral notes, then kicks in incense, after an hour or so settles down in great floral patchouly heart with olibanum vanilic base :)

    its oriental,spicy, the name coromandel suggests in my language sweet fennel, so it smells like that herbal spice!

    12 October, 2012 (Last Edited: 18 October, 2012)

    Zut's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Top: citruses, bitter orange, neroli
    Heart: jasmine, rose, patchouli, orris
    Base: incense, olibanum, benzoin, woodsy notes, musk, Tahitian vanilla

    The moment I tried Coromandel, I fell head over heels in love with this fragrance. For about 2 hours, I kept smelling my wrist. The rich, sweet and exotic oriental concoction was so divinely intoxicating I almost rushed back to the Chanel boutique to buy the 200ml bottle. Then, with no warning, the musk note that had remained rather discreet up to that point suddenly appeared and ruined everything for me. As I often said before, I am not too big on animalic notes and musk is most certainly an ingredient that does not agree with me. I believe it is the combination of musk and jasmine that reacts badly on my skin. To my utter disappointment, this exclusive EDT I was so crazy about minutes before had turned into a rather uninteresting cheap-smelling musk-based fragrance.

    The friend who accompanied me to the store also tried Coromandel but with very different results. On her skin, the fragrance developed much better. The fresh yet zesty citrus notes were very present. More importantly, the dreadful musk note did not show up at all. However, it failed to do what any animalic note is intended to do i.e. give the fragrance longevity and stability. We both found Coromandel extremely pleasant on her but she did not buy it either due to its unfortunate lack of staying power. A third party was supposed to be with us that afternoon. Who knows? Maybe Coromandel would have fit him to a T!

    18 July, 2012

    srmd22's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Beautiful ambery scent, with a complex opening. Sweet vanilla/amber drydown, maybe with a slight woodsy aspect. I probably won't by this one, because it feels mostly like a gourmand to me, and I have several excellent gourmands and sweet frags, but I do love the way this smells. Good sillage and longevity (lasts the whole workday, no problem).

    20th April, 2012

    spirit966's avatar

    Hong Kong Hong Kong

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Super long lasting juice, then again, anything with a strong patchouli note does also.

    Not really fond of the opening, its a bit of a cherry, almond smell which I find a bit off putting. The amber here is very nice and reminds me of Eau Lente from Diptyque (just texture not smell), may be its the incense and benzoin/opoponax doing tricks.

    Dries down to a creamy, almondy, white chocolate sensation,and yes, this is like Amen white chocolate edition you can say, but less sweet.

    Interesting fragrance, its a like but not a love as I don't find it compelling or challenging enough and the opening wasn't that appealing to me. Its an oriental that its warming or caressing and comforting enough for me and a bit too much patchouli.

    12 March, 2012

    Fhaoilgeal's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    On first sniff the smell of flowers freshly picked in full bloom, quickly dispelled by an olfactory image of working in the garden...a bag of potting soil just opened standing next to a hole dug for a flowering plant.

    The scent of the potting soil powerful, earthy, fecund with astringent notes of minerals, the fragrance of the flowers overshadowed by it's bedding partner.
    The flower is planted, the hole filled with potting soil, tamped down, watered, the two smells - potting soil and flowers tussle, the potting soil more angular, the flowers more globular, yielding.

    Watering and time brings a melding, occasionally a dominant note, the bouquet of earth gentled by water, floral perfume becoming resinous on being joined to the soil.
    A tight, slow, intoxicating dance, the interplay of shadow and sunlight, sensual.

    Two thumbs up and an important mile marker along the patchouli highway.

    24 February, 2012

    dollars&scents's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Coromandel by Chanel - One is initially treated to wafts of peppery spiciness commingling with a somewhat camphoraceous, yet dirty, patchouli. This intriguing and inviting melange floats on an ephemeral cloud of salty fruitiness and spices of cloves and ginger. Aromatic woods, with hints of lemon verbena and minty laurel, serve as a backdrop to this stirring opening. Transitioning to the middle, the woods fade and wisps of florals, with violet-like iris, clover-like rose and sweetly seductive jasmine, interface with the musty earthiness of patchouli, which has taken on a clay-like facet. A nascent, vanillic amber sprinkles the melange, giving the florals a creamy texture, and coaxes a cocoa aspect of patchouli to rise up. Segueing to the robust base, balsamic woods, hay-like beeswax, herbaceous cinnamon, all intermingle and interplay with the vanillic and almond sweetness of benzoin. The heavy, resinous, sweetish amber has come into full bloom. A restrained smoky frankincense reels about. And, a chocolate-like tone presents from the interweaving of coumarin and patchouli. A delightsome drydown ensues. This high-quality composition is definitely unisex, if not leaning masculine, and has average projection and longevity. Its elegance will shine in the fall and winter.

    17 February, 2012

    mrcologneguy's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    I love it. It's pretty heavy on patchouli, almost too much so for my taste, but the patchouli is redeemed by an array of complementing rich, smoky, and sweet notes that play in and out all day long. One little spray to the chest and you will be entertained for hours.

    Coromandel is a superb value. One of the best, strongest and longest-lasting in my collection. Beautiful packaging. Might be my favorite Chanel.

    I have to say this, too: it seems too good to last. If you're at all interested, you should buy a bottle before corporate bean counters decide that reformulation would be a good idea. Looking into my crystal ball, I'm seeing Basenoters in the year 2022 starting threads about how the rare 2012 formulation is definitely worth paying triple the price. Yes, it is that good.

    15 February, 2012 (Last Edited: 14 January, 2013)

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    You need patience till the end in order to fully appreciate the real hyper sophisticated aristocratic french refinement. What I particularly love of Coromandel is its distinction (reminding in a modern key the glorious old french chypre history) and the balance since it becomes for a while almost a gourmand in the middle of the development with its powdery and honeyed note of cocoa beans however remaining at the end averagely sharp, balanced, hyper subtle and dry-spicy. The final somewhat eliotropic amber-benzoin is indeed so well appointed (with its Etro Heliotrope's undertone) and never suffocating, just preventing to veil the main and starring note, "sua maestà" the patchouli. I agree who with writes that the Coromandel's spiciness (almost piquancy) and the skillfully crafted implementation of the note of frankincense plus balsams, patchouli and moss remind the Guerlain's classic landmark we find in the denser Heritage; that's sheer but I have to underline that the almost creamy, chocolatey and resinous central vibe is just fugacious and tends to fade towards a more subtle and sharper final rooty chypre outcome. The spicy patchouli backbone jumps out rooty and averagely restrained at the end, being flanked in a first moment by a well dosed, slightly powdery and distinguished usage of cocoa beans and balsams while later by a perfectly combined mossy-musky amber that fits perfectly with the general cool brightness of the ambery/eliotropic aroma. Some fruity-floral elements are mixed in this unisex blend that is finally refined, subtle and minimalistic enough to aspire becoming a renowned classic.

    11th February, 2012 (Last Edited: 10th May, 2014)

    Kaern's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Had great hopes with Coromandel after wearing the delicious vetiver - Sycomore from the same range. However, I found all the notes and accords, especially the amber and patchouli way too powerful. In fact, the opening five minutes was almost unbearable in it's stridency. The drydown is ok, but I found the vanilla note used here a touch sickly, almost Givenchy PI like. If this had copied the subtleness of Bois des Iles, I think it would have been much improved. Awarding a neutral is being generous, but it isn't a bad fragrance, just not for me.

    31st January, 2012

    odysseusm's avatar

    Canada Canada

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Notes: amber, frankincense, benzoin, "soulful woody notes"
    Amber from the get-go, zingy benzoin... and yet I like it??? Well, those elements are bold yet delivered with a classy nod to restraint, and they are admirably framed by a very interesting frankincense. The package is complex and intriguing. It is cool and yet has a warm dark chocolate / vanilla / rubber note. Yet, I like it (and I don't really care for those notes normally). The benzoin comes across almost like opoponax, a very sweet and perfumed myrrh. The scent is intriguing, a bit of a shape-shifter as it moves between the various discrete elements. Finally, it settles into a very attractive dry woody scent. In my opinion, this what Guerlain's Bois D'Armenie should be -- restrained yet slightly rich, wood and benzoin, sweet and yet dry. Well done!

    13 January, 2012

    manicboy's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    And here I thought Thierry Mugler had a corner on the fragrance market for that (in)famous patchouli & cocoa accord. Chanel and Jacques Polge take this accord to new, lofty heights unimagined by Mugler. In fact, it makes Mugler's Amen & Angel seem crude and obnoxious. Coromandel's lovely patchouli and cocoa accord is light, feathery, and sublime, like thin cheesecloth held over hippy dream of patchouli and chocolate. Never heavy. There's also delightful amber and vanilla here that complement and surround the patchouli & cocoa. Like others have said, I find this more masculine than feminine and it's one of Chanel's best and boldest scent in years. Too bad the other exclusives aren't this inventive and good.

    31st October, 2011

    Leilahdancer's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    On our trip to Las Vegas I visited about a dozen perfume retailers to sample a long list of researched and recommended scents. I was searching for a new primary fragrance. I thought I wanted a floriental with a bit of spice. What did I know?

    My first stop should have been my last. At the Chanel store in the Wynn, Jessica was most helpful and I was able to enjoy all of the frags available. I've no idea why I waited until last to try Coromandel. Everything I sniffed was nice, but not me. Classy, wonderful accords, but lacking what I want from a fragrance. I wanted a rich scent that pushed the limits a little. These Chanels were lovely,. On someone else. My gourmand-y heart wanted more. More a flavor, than a fragrance.

    Then came Coromandel. One sniff and my eyes lit up. This, this was the one! I wanted it, but intended to do much more sniffing that day, so declined to actually test. Six hours and ten stores later, I was back. I couldn't get it out of my head.

    Rich spices with a patchouli edge, just enough vanilla to lend sweetness. And a creamy whiff of chocolate throughout. All of this and without smelling like a cookie.

    Wore it to a show that night and I could catch a hint every time I applauded. The sillage was perfect. My seat mate commented that she noticed it on occasion as well, and thought it was very nice. Who would have guessed that Chanel made a gourmand pleasing lovely like this. I am in love!

    12 September, 2011 (Last Edited: 22 September, 2011)

    blueyezz's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    This has that gourmand-y sweetness going on that I just don't get on with. The spices are barely evident on my skin, with my least favourite perfume aroma, vanilla, taking centre stage. The patch is a supporting player to my nose. I wish it were stronger.

    Try as I might, I just don't like it very much but I'm giving it a neutral as its clearly a good example of its type.

    06 September, 2011

    blood-orange's avatar

    Australia Australia

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    It was Katie Puckrik who had me wanting to try this fragrance. After watching her perfume collection videos on YouTube and hearing all about her love for incense-based scents, Chanel's Coromandel went straight to the top of my 'for test' list.

    It took a while for me to discover my love for Coromandel. When first applied to the skin, it seemed to be very masculine and indeed very strong. The incense note was barely evident for the first ten minutes.

    When I re-visited Coromandel, it reminded me of a stronger, more lasting and much more complex version of Allure Sensuelle.

    After leaving the Chanel boutique I was quite certain that Chanel's Beige was my pick, however as I walked on through the crowd of people at the mall, I was enchanted by a deliciously smokey scent drifting up and around my nose.

    Once settled into the heart, the magic of Coromandel can be truly felt. This is less sophisticated than other Chanel's I've tried. Coromandel makes me feel like a bad-girl; a little daring, merciless and wild.

    Coromandel is earthy patchouli, rich ambery incense, exotic spices, syrupy vanilla and dusty woods. I would be game enough to call this fragrance sexy.

    Some people mention chocolate as a note not listed here, and on second thoughts, there is a rather chocolatey accord hidden in there somewhere. However, don't expect Coromandel to be anything like Thierry Mugler's Angel.

    The lasting strength is amazing. I had my wrist stuck to my nose until almost 3am. I think Coromandel excited me so much that I couldn't sleep.

    27 August, 2011

    thatbrownelf's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    Coromandel is my go-to comfort scent. I would classify it as a milky-oriental, with its creamy vanilla-chocolate notes, soft spice, and warm woods. It's like curling up wrapped in a golden-brown cashmere wrap on an antique velvet mahogany couch, sipping a creamy spicy chai while watching your favorite movie.

    27 August, 2011

    rickbr's avatar

    Brazil Brazil

    Show all reviews

    rating


     

    It`s hard to find exactly what i dislike here, but Coromandel is a composition that doesn`t create me comfort or makes me feel elegant or sexy or pleases me. On skin, there`s something between the patchouli and amber that should be like music but instead it`s like nails on blackboard. The earthy, powdery and complex aura of patchouli gets ruined by a wrong amber and i feel frustrated and peeved everytime i wear it. The rose and vanilla doesn`t help to mask or harmonize the main idea. The rose, specially, creates a plastic impression with the amber that seems to go in and out of focus, just like an annyoing note poking the nose.
    I prefer other variations of this idea - for a luxury, outrageously expensive one, Richwood does the service much better creating a smooth evolution, keeping the structure and avoiding the amber common place. Zino Davidoff is very close to Coromandel, but uses the amber with more wisdom. And you also have the dark, bitter chocolate patchouly version on Borneo 1834 by Serge Lutens. It`s a good luxury addition to the les exclusif line and one that it`s adherent with the austere fragrant vision of vintage chanels. But it has a lapse of judgment for me in the choose of the base note. I decided to wear it again after an year to see if i changed my mind on this one, but honestly i don`t miss it and i think that i`ll not miss its smell soon.


    EDIT: After 5 hours the amber aspect faded away and i got a base of a skincent vanillic aroma of subtle incense nuances. It`s quite pleasant, but discomfort with the first 5 hours is enough to keep me away of wearing it. Since those impressions will rely of your scensibility to what is used in the fragrance, you may have a very different experience, maybe much more pleasant, than mine.

    04 July, 2011 (Last Edited: 06 July, 2011)

    Showing 1 to 30 of 64.