Reviews of Patchouli 24 by Le Labo

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    Kain's avatar
    Kain
    Iran Iran

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    First time when I sniffed this, the smell was very familiar to my nose!
    Then I take a look at the perfumer and I saw Annick Menardo! he has done a really great job with a fragrance with the same DNA before and yes, that's Bvlgari Black!
    It doesn't smell exactly like that but very close and with the same DNA.
    The opening is dark and almost smoky leather scent with some sweetness in the background and also some patchouli but I would say this is not a patchouli based fragrance!
    The patchouli is there but sweetened with vanilla and very strong dose of leather that give the scent a very dark aura!
    In the mid the leather and vanilla become stronger.
    The leather note has a very smoky and dark aroma. maybe like Bvlgari Black almost rubbery but better than that.
    The vanilla in this fragrance smell much better and more natural than Bvlgari Black.
    The vanilla was synthetic in Bvlgari Black but here is much more sensual and quality.
    Still you can smell patchouli but it's in the background.
    The scent didn't change that much in the base.
    The leather note settled down and vanilla is very strong and sweet and patchouli is still in the background.
    While they name it Patchouli 24, I must say that the patchouli is more like a supporting note instead of the main note!
    Projection is really good and strong and longevity is excellent.
    A very good fragrance. I like it.

    16 February, 2014

    rbaker's avatar
    rbaker


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    The first minutes I get a dark and harsh patchouli, but soon it is as if a cloud of black smoke has descended. It is a harsh, open-fire smoked-ham-with-Oolong note, with transient whiffs of asphalt, and without any Knize-Ten-style petrol on my skin. The beginning has a few touches that indeed remind me if Bvlgari Black's opening. There is clearly a lot of deliciously rough birchwood involved, developing into a rich, intense and edgy leather scent. After about three hours it mellows and is closer to my skin, with a mild vanilla that is never really very sweet on me - the beast is tamed. And a hair-on-the-chest tough beast it is: This is not wearing a tender silk gown like Chanel's Cuir du Russie, and it lacks the fresh elegance of Creed's CdR masterpiece. Le Labo's Patchouli 24 is a brilliant and gutsy exercise in birchwood and leather, with patchouli more an afterthought after the initial blast. Le Labo' names can be a bit like Oxford's Bachelor of Civil Law, which is really not a Bachelor's degree at all. The scent, however, is splendid, with good silage and projection in the first phases and a total longevity of nearly seven hours. Great stuff!

    05 February, 2014 (Last Edited: 04 February, 2014)

    paintdallas's avatar
    paintdallas
    United States United States

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    Smoke. Just smoke. The sweetness faded, the patchouli was but a faint whisper in the very onset, then just smoke. On me that was the singular and defining note that brought along no other friends to the party. I will admit that I do alter fragrance in rather extreme ways, so this could rock on others but it was a one note disappointment for me. My quest for the perfect patchouli continues.

    31st December, 2013

    drseid's avatar
    drseid
    United States United States

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    Patchouli 24 opens with a very earthy, near camphorous patchouli before quickly transitioning to its birch driven heart. During the early heart the earthy patchouli moves to a barely detectable supporting role as a very smoky rugged birch wood driven leather accord quickly emerges and dominates the composition through its entire middle section with hints of the birch's woody nature peeping through at times. During the late dry-down the patchouli completely disappears with the smoky leather softening, as dry slightly powdery vanilla from the base first acts as underlying support before growing into the late focus as the development comes to a close. Projection is excellent and longevity outstanding at well over 15 hours on skin.

    As many others have mentioned (and quite typical of Le Labo) the Patchouli name on the bottle is far from a good indicator of what one sniffs. The *real* star of most of the development is the birch wood driven smoky leather. The birch near completely overpowers any traces of the patchouli, and by the time the composition reaches the late dry-down the patchouli appears completely gone. Apart from the addition of the late developing vanilla there really aren't many detectable notes (though the "24" in the name indicates there actually are 24 different ingredients). To me, Patchouli 24 really is a minimalist hard-core leather fragrance through-and-through, and an excellent one at that. The bottom line is the $240 per 100ml bottle Patchouli 24 has a deceptive name and most likely will disappoint those looking for a patchouli-focused composition, but hardcore leather lovers are bound to be pleased with its superior minimalist execution, earning it a "very good" to "excellent" rating of 3.5 to 4 stars out of 5.

    29 December, 2013

    flathorn's avatar
    flathorn
    United States United States

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    This fragrance was easy-going on my skin, even with the birch tar and smoke. When it opened I got an impression of smoke, patchouli and cream soda or root beer. I think it was the combination of vanilla, birch and a Lapsong-type tea note, lightly sweetened. It all swam around a roughened earthy, but not really aggressive, patchouli. I should have been offended by the combination but it was kind of comforting.
    In the mid note, I smelled more leather, which amped up the sensuality, and was my favorite part of the fragrance. There continued to be a sort of birchy root soda note. These notes weren't welded in place. They were the product of ingredients floating around creating associations, one of which was cream soda. But it shifted to Lapsong tea, styrax, leather, an agreeable earthy patchouli and birchy tar. The dry down had less leather and settled a little more solidly into the earthy patchouli and palely sweetened smokey birch beer note.
    I thought this was a comfort fragrance - there were so many associations from my childhood in it. It has a decided birch tar, but I grew up burning birchwood in a wood stove, so this is like being home. It had a fair amount of complexity built into it, what with the way the notes shifted and formed new chords until the dry down. Kind of a neat trick really. Root beer is not my idea of a fragrance note, but I can't help but like it here, wrapped as it is in so many warm smoky, earthy notes. Nice fragrance.

    11th December, 2013 (Last Edited: 07 February, 2014)

    jtd's avatar
    jtd
    United States United States

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    fan letter

    A review of le Labo Patchouli 24, and coincidentally

    a fan letter to Bvgari Black.

    Thank you, Annick Menardo.

    If I find a genre of perfume that I like, I embrace it. I stock up. With Patchouli 24, I’ve cornered the market on the smokey-leather-tea-patchouli-resinous-vanilla genre. The other two in this category I already own: Bvlgari Black and Andy Tauer Lonestar Memories.

    When comparing apples to apples, the small differences carry great weight, and decision making is easy. I wear all three and never have the least difficulty choosing which one to wear on any given day.

    Lonestar, Black and Patch 24 share a number of notes, and in fact could look very similar on paper. But notes and verbal descriptors have little to do with the experience of wearing these perfumes. Lonestar takes a sense of intention and deliberation to wear. But when the stars align, wearing Lonestar pays dividends. Bvlgari Black, less rough than Lonestar and more tailored than Patchouli 24, is the star of the three. Lonestar is rough and Patchouli 24 is dense, but both perfumes result from the cooperation of their notes. (There was a television ad for a dog treat that coined the repulsive phrase, "crun-chewy" solving, I suppose, a millenia-long dilemma in the dog world) The term for this particular perfume synergy would be, "am-birch-tar-y."

    But Black has a different motivation than cooperation, and the logic is indisputable. It thrives on the difference of its constituent parts and makes them work together in a complementary fashion rather than simply uniting them as a boy-band would be cast. Black has the seamless coordination of a perfectly crafted mechanical device. It’s not harmony, it’s the satisfaction of perfectly milled locks and keys.

    Sweetness is the difference between the three. Black’s sweetness is the charm that results from amber, rubber and powder. Inedible, delectable. Lonestar’s sweetness is the sharp edge of tar, blanched white florals and and uncut vanilla extract. Patchouli 24’s sweetness is the key to its affability. The sweetness triggers perceptions of lushness and the sense of having satisfied a craving, but it never once falls into gourmand territory. This sweetness is the pressure valve of Patch 24. It is the reassurance of safety in a perfume that asks you to be comfortable in a place you’ve never really felt fully at ease. Trust the sweetness. You won’t fall into the gourmand trap, yet by the same token the big bad wolf (tarry, smokey leather) won’t harm you.

    It’s no wonder that no matter the form, the field or the genre, thoughtful, accomplished artists over a period of time will work out their ideas in a specific range rather than inventing a new wheel with each series of works. From Femme to Ocean Rain, Edmond Roudnitska illuminated the fruity chypre. Pina Bausch showed us the depth of change that mid-20th century Europe had to accept moving from post-colonialism to multi-culturalism. Menardo has a gem of a focus, and arguably she’s written the book on what could be fleshed out into its own genre. Consider also that she’s virtually the sole author of the by Killian line. The opportunity to shape a line, and separately to creating a genre is not a common opportunity in perfumery. I’m ecstatic to know that it’s Ms. Menardo at the wheel.

    from scent hurdle.com

    27 August, 2013

    Switch245's avatar
    Switch245


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    Never mind my original review; after you get past the strange barbecued meat vibe in the beginning, it drys down to a wonderfully smoky smell that reminds me of cookouts in the summertime, yet with a vanilla note that reminds me this is still a perfume.

    02 November, 2012 (Last Edited: 29 April, 2013)

    Preston H's avatar
    Preston H
    United States United States

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    I can't believe base notes has this as a femme scent. When I went to le labo to complete my rose 31 set I was wearing my royal English leather by creed. The lovely sales associate thought I was wearing this gem which immediately prompted me to test this in the store, love at first sniff. It's smoky and leathery without the citrus that makes a leather scent smell too medicinal IMO. This is my fifth day wearing this in a row rare for a new bottle and there's nothing stopping me from a sixth..

    07 September, 2012

    TOONS1200's avatar
    TOONS1200
    United States United States

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    Annick Menardo is one of my favorite perfumers, but this scent is just wrong. it smells like a barn yard. it's plain and simple vile. this and montale oud cuir d'arabie have made their way to the "never sniff again" section of the sample filing system

    15 August, 2012

    surge's avatar
    surge
    United States United States

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    From the reviews, I wanted this to be similar to Japon Noir or Borneo 1834 or possibly even Pure Malt (smoke + patchouli + sweetness) but it's really not, unfortunately.

    First; the opening...like most Le Labo frag's I've tried, it's extremely strong; I would def. call it pungent.
    Knocks you out and not in a good way. TBH it smells like a bon fire with bags of dog feces in the middle of the flames, burning one by one and eminating stinkyness along with the backdrop from the burning wood.
    Also it smells like someone is BBQ'ing a dead horse carcass marinaded with some kind of sweet and sour sauce in the middle of the fire as well.

    Whatever this is, it doesn't work well at all.
    So next I'm thinking...OK..where's the patchouli?

    I love patchouli scents...A*MEN, Pure Malt, Japon Noir -- awesome, all in my top 20 scents and all great patchouli notes.

    It takes a good 30 minutes before you can smell even the slightest hint of patchouli; again leading me to question Le Labo's naming (ie. rose31 is mostly cumin and barely any rose).

    The drydown is OK; I get leather moss combined with the burning wood from the beginning which sticks around until the end. Still barely any patchouli.
    Don't care for this one...the opening is plain awful and there's barely any patchouli to be found.

    Also BTW, at the top this says "feminine" -- If I ever smelled a woman girl wearing this I would run away at lightning fast speeds....if a woman smells of barbecue horse carcass with dog feces and patchouli...that's not a good thing.

    13 May, 2012 (Last Edited: 15 May, 2012)

    blood-orange's avatar
    blood-orange
    Australia Australia

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    Patchouli 24 is quite possibly one of the smokiest scents I'll ever experience in this lifetime. This scent is not entirely patchouli like the name suggests; not earthy and green like most fragrances are with this accord.

    There is a striking and captivating dustiness that is all too beautiful on the skin. At times this fragrance reminds me of camp-fires, ash and incense, all the things that I find appealing. It is no wonder that I love this scent so much.

    The vanilla which tends to linger softly behind the smokey patchouli and woodsy notes, is divine and rather feminine on the skin. I must say that I'm a very feminine person, and I do not agree that this is strictly for men. It is too beautiful not to be shared between genders.

    There is a touch of leather in this composition which provides a sensual, animalistic quality. For that reason alone I'm tempted to wear this out on the town to see the various reactions from men. To me, Patchouli 24 is the scent of a confident and captivating seductress.

    I love Rebella's (Fragrantica reviewer) description, "velvety smoke" which I find sums up this fragrance perfectly. Be forewarned that this fragrance is rather intense, being heavy in its projection and lasting on the skin. If you've ever tried Annick Goutal's Les Orientalistes range, Patchouli 24 smells very similar to Myrrhe Ardente and Encens Flamboyant.

    04 April, 2012

    Harvitz81's avatar
    Harvitz81


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    A very powerful and smoky birch tar opening laced with a little tobacco. Some sweet patchouli emerges, but this remains smoky throughout and wears pretty linear from the get go. After many hours I can detect a little wood notes and some sweet fruit notes, but that isn’t until well into the dry down. This one projects well and lasts forever. I happen to like this one quite a bit.

    08 February, 2012

    katchan's avatar
    katchan
    United States United States

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    This Le Labo creation rocked my world. It was the reason I became perfume obsessed. It literally opened my eyes to a new way of creating fragrances. The smoky muskiness is super sexy without being formulaic. The tea, leather, and patch combo are unlike anything else I've ever smelled. Bravo!

    11th January, 2012

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    Sunsetspawn
    United States United States

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    Patchouli 24 opens with smoke and patchouli, and although the smoke seems dominant up close, the sillage is full of patchouli. This is my favorite part of the fragrance, as the patchouli reminds me of the kind in TM's Pure Coffee. Unfortunately,this patchouli slowly fades away leaving behind a mildly pleasant smoke. And doubly unfortunately, I'm mildly allergic to this smoke as it seems to be derived from birch tar. Most peculiarly, I don't start showing symptoms of the allergy until the patchouli is gone and the only thing left is the smoke.

    This might be great for someone in a metal band because of the smoke smell, but seriously, the patchouli just isn't pulling it's weight and that makes me a sad panda.

    14 December, 2011

    alfarom's avatar
    alfarom
    Italy Italy

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    Everybody knows Annick Menardo is a genious and Patchouli 24 is surely among her most relevant compositions but, where many of their deliveries have striked as *yummy yummy* gourmands, P24 it's more like a gourmand that nobody would dare to eat. It opens with a breathtaking smoked ham/meat note joined by leather (birch?), dark smoky tea and a rubber vibe that definitely resembles of both Lonestar Memories and Bulgari Black...but at the n-th power. Patchouli, animalic notes and vanilla make their appearance right away bringing the composition into a more comforting territory but still nowhere close being easily approachable. Leather is prominent throughout and provides a good balance to the sweeter woody/vanilla drydown.

    Overall, more than a patchouli centered composition, I get P24 as a leather/vanilla fragrance with a twist and while the similar Bulgari Black is definitely more wearable, it still strikes as a sort of edulcorated version of P24 which I see as a big step forward in the same direction. Be carefull with dosage. Super projection and tenacious lasting power.

    Salubrious and toxic at the same time. Definitely not for everybody.

    24 November, 2011

    Darvant's avatar
    Darvant
    Italy Italy

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    Nice and heavy ambery fragrance, a strange  smokey masculine oriental in the same vein of Mazzolari Lui that turns immediately out in all its smokey, leathery, animal and vanillic temperament with a sheer presence of camphor, a barely perceivable patchouli, aromatic and rubbery birch tar and styrax, a touch of medicinal and green (labdanum). The initial animal smoke is impressive and overwhelming. The medicinal whiff is a current element in the fragrances of the brand and it cooperates to exude the boisterous first complex blast that seems to express all the strength of a scent that with time fades is a sort of ancient and vintage smoky amber-patchouli a bit cozy, vanillic, incensey and rubbery. As many others underlined the patchouli is absolutely not starring and straightforward, i perceive mostly a note of camphoraceous, leathery and syrupy amber with a touch of whiskey, a woodsy-mossy (labdanum) character and a notable smokey temperament. The fragrance is dark-brown, a bit incensey, aromatic and tarry, it's not too resinous because the incensey and rubbery feel of the styrax, birch tar and may be olibanum balance the vanillic and dense woodsy-smoky elements. From the contrast between resinous and dusty elements some woods appear in order to ground texture and stableness.

    13 November, 2011 (Last Edited: 02 March, 2013)

    sherapop's avatar
    sherapop
    United States United States

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    What happens when you soak a dirty leather jacket in a vat of Lapsang Souchong tea? Well, I think that the result would be similar to the opening of the perhaps misleadingly named Le Labo PATCHOULI 24. I suppose that it's because patchouli frags have flooded the market and most of them are totally (in some cases overwhelmingly) patchouli-centric that I was so very surprised to find such a heavy leather scent in a vial labeled PATCHOULI 24. I do think that there is a bit of patchouli here, but it is hidden within a zipped pocket of the Lapsang Souchong-soaked leather jacket. There is also a brief appearance of an ever-so-slight touch of booziness initially, but it smooths out rather swiftly, producing only a slight tempering of the leather by the drydown.

    I gather that the leather-Lapsang Souchong effect (what many are describing as "campfire"--and perhaps that's more apt, or at least more consistent with the dirty leather jacket...) is somehow alchemically produced out of birch tar and styrax. Whatever the case may be, this composition is at least unisex, if not fully masculine. Well, unless the woman in question happens to be a biker, in which case PATCHOULI 24 would work quite nicely, I think. I should add, though, that the drydown is quite a bit softer, as though the leather has been rendered more supple by the tea infusion--or was it just the quickly slammed shot of whiskey finally kicking in?

    Yet again I am impressed by the power and longevity of a Le Labo creation, but this one's not for me, although I did enjoy the Harley test ride to view the dying embers of a California wild fire at dusk.

    19 September, 2011

    spice's avatar
    spice


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    Love it! Brings back memories of hospital antiseptic, but good ones.

    09 July, 2011 (Last Edited: 22 August, 2011)

    LucasKane's avatar
    LucasKane
    Netherlands Netherlands

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    Surreal scent! Memories of old books, wooden furniture, dusty rooms, campfire smoke, barbecue sauce and it's all in this small bottle. Magical, words fall short, a true masterpiece.

    07 June, 2011

    aoe's avatar
    aoe
    Austria Austria

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    I wouldn't want to wear this every day, but it's a fascinating scent and one that I will likely revisit when the time is right - maybe in somewhat cooler weather, although the opening burning/tarry note has a certain summer feel in that it evokes machinery operating in the hot sun (like some of the older tram cars used here in Vienna - I love the city and vintage public transport, so for me that is not bad).

    After the tar/patchouli I still find more smoke, but the smell gets a distinct tobacco note, I seem to perceive some sandalwood and gorgeous, gorgeous vanilla. With a few quick sprays from the test vial it seems to last for a long time.

    To me the scent starts very unsweet but with the vanilla/sandalwood gets less so (i. e. a bit sweeter) over time. It was clearly noticeable even outside, so there's definitely some sillage.

    23 May, 2011

    Redbeard's avatar
    Redbeard
    United States United States

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    I'm not really the patchouli expert, but let me first make the judgement that this is a unisex fragrance, or maybe even masculine. What you get to begin with is no Nicolai Patchouli; it is smoother, softer, sweeter and more floral, with none of the grating sharpness you sometimes find, but unfortunately just a dash of Windex. It gets less floral and more musty as the topnotes pass, with (at least the illusion of) some very heavy tobacco; this leaves it with quite a prominent incense or cigarette aspect, or even a dry post-wildfire scent. After a while, the smoke to me most resembles that from burning chaparral, the ominous smell of approaching disaster for us Californians. I'm impressed that this fragrance goes through such a sharp transition, but as far as the woodsmoke genre goes, I still need to revisit the CdG Incense Series to set the benchmark. It reminds me of Avignon, but that's based on a rather vague memory.

    21st May, 2011

    subhuman85's avatar
    subhuman85
    Canada Canada

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    Mercurial, shimmering, Gareth Pugh-esque (ie. on the razor's edge of wearability) composition from that mistress of the weird and wonderful, Annick Menardo. Explodes off the skin with a mix of lapsang souchong tea (read: campfire), cedar, patchouli (it's there, look harder), gasoline, and a bone-dry vanilla that somehow blends perfectly with the smoky salvo. Much like Menardo's Black for Bulgari, 24 is a bipolar shape-shifter, seeming sweet and sultry one minute, coarse and carcinogenic the next. Unlike the easygoing Black, though, 24 can be fickle: The drydown occasionally calls to mind a glass of flat, watered-down root beer into which someone's extinguished a cigarette. But when it works, Patchouli 24 is nothing short of relevatory, a delicously dark confection with a rich presence and phenomenal staying power. Not for all tastes, but a masterwork regardless.

    03 May, 2011

    Oh_Hedgehog's avatar
    Oh_Hedgehog
    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Wielding the savage aroma of rectified birch tar, Annick Ménardo introduces a Gothic horror version of her earlier Bulgari Black, exaggerating with brilliant pungency the latter's top notes of lapsang souchong and then extending its vanilla drydown to something so distinct as to qualify as an oriental in its own right. Patchouli 24 is the brawn to complement Black's brains.

    The initial ferocity of Patchouli 24 is awesome and can be compared with Gorilla Perfumes' Breath of God (the Exhale accord), or Tauer's Lonestar Memories. With these top notes you can almost hear the cracking of burning bark and spluttering of resin fires. This black, pyroligneous uproar lasts for a good few hours and then begins a gentle transition to sweetly-spiced purple fruits, during which Patchouli 24 reveals itself to be a phenolic vanilla. Although it's a concession I'm usually willing to make, I find the oriental turn problematic – not for its implementation, which is sound – but for smoothing out the raggedness up top that I so relish. In terms of intent I'd prefer a less benign resolution to Patchouli 24, but despite the volte-face it remains darkly fantastic.

    02 February, 2011

    nsamadi's avatar
    nsamadi


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    The best fragrance in the Le Labo line, but since many find it difficult to wear or get into it, there isn't many followers of the scent. I consider it to be the cult favorite in the Le Labo line. It's the signature scent for the motorcycle riding, leather jacket wearing, beard stubble bad boy.

    Patchouli 24 is also created by perfumer Annick Menardo, who also developed Bulgari Black. Both scents although not similar in terms of smell, share some similarities, that rubber vanilla combination. I'm thinking Annick Menardo wanted to do this with Bulgari Black, but did not have the budget.

    Patchouli 24 is also a very linear scent, what you spray from the get-go, is what you get in the drydown, and it follows the same unconventional note pyramid of Bulgari Black. The beauty of Patchouli 24 is how well the notes are blended. No one aspect of the scent overpowers the other. Just an equal balanced ratio of leather, smoke, rubber, and vanilla.

    09 December, 2010

    cformosa4's avatar
    cformosa4
    Canada Canada

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    I love this scent! Great sillage, great longevity but the opening is hard to swallow. The opening smells like you have been camping and have been sitting in the smoke trail of the fire all weekend.
    However, after you let that pass it turn into a beautiful vanillic, smokey, chemically leather... Its not a sweet vanilla, its very dry.

    It smells like you're in an old old old university -- you're sitting in biology class dissecting a frog that has been sitting in chemical formaldehyde... the librarians are right outside the open window burning OLD OLD OLD books.. (That sweet, dry vanilla smell that old books get) -- the smoke from the old vanillic dry books is wafting in the window while you dissect the chemically smelling frog....

    i am going crazy with the imagery with this scent but this one really got to me.. it just reminded me of biology class, the old books in the library and smoke... so that picture just came to me.

    09 December, 2010

    finsfan's avatar
    finsfan
    United States United States

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    Good: Great silage, great longevity

    Bad: No patchouli as far as I can tell. I get a cinnamon/clove vibe against a background of leather, glove leather. Nicely crafted. It seemed that it warmed on the skin after 30 minutes, and then stayed linear. I get the smoke, not as smokey as Fumerie Turque but smokey nonetheless. However, it leaves me wanting more. If I had never smelled Fumerie Turque, I might have said this is a great smokey scent.

    01st December, 2010

    Mimi Gardenia's avatar
    Mimi Gardenia
    United States United States

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    I love Patchouli 24 and I don't particularly like patchouli. But this is done right. It downright sexy with smoke and for some reason the patchouli agrees with me . The smoke doesn't seem to last on my skin but what is left ,is elegantly risque patchouli with a certain sweetness and leather . Quite smooth and almost cognac -y in feel to me. Decent longevity - better longevity than Labdanum 18 . Unisex.

    22 September, 2010

    holyzoo's avatar
    holyzoo
    United States United States

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    I wish I could go for this because I know it has an infinite depth to it. It's one of the thickest concoctions I've ever smelled. And at first it intrigues me, and then it chokes me. I try not to throw away my samples, but the smell of the slightest residue on the sample glass was taking over too much of a space, and had me hating on it within a few days. I ended up trying Patchouly by Profumum as well, and I think it's probably superior, but I'm not into that either.

    23 March, 2010

    Diamondflame's avatar
    Diamondflame
    Singapore Singapore

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    Little by way of patchouli but more of a leather oriental, thanks to the styrax, birch tar and I'm quite certain, labdanum. On first impressions, the smoke-and-leather act seems to peg this squarely as a masculine scent but a rather unisexual common thread of ambery sweetness unifies the disparate elements and smoothens out the numerous phase-shifts between notes of camphor, incense, smoke, leather, tobacco and resins. Rather reminiscent of Serge Lutens Serge Noire, come to think of it.

    While I'm not sure if I'd love to smell PATCHOULI 24 on a woman or if it even deserves the 5-Star rating by Luca Turin, I certainly cannot deny its appeal as an excellent masculine oriental.

    26 February, 2010 (Last Edited: 28 February, 2010)

    NillaGoon's avatar
    NillaGoon
    United States United States

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    Barbecue sauce for humans! Awesome!

    I do get just a hint of camphor in the far background, which I assume is probably the patchouli. But for me, the notes of campfire and smoke are predominant. And it's rather sweet; hence the barbecue association. It lasts just the right amount of time, 6-7 hours, and has just the right amount of projection.

    I really do like this, but it's perilously close to the odor of "liquid smoke" products used as a culinary ingredient (check your grocery store's spice aisle or the section with barbecue sauces). There are various brands, and they all smell a bit different, but Patchouli 24 is right in the neighborhood. It kind of kills the magic for me, in two ways. First, it robs the scent of its sophisticated, "dark" cachet (how special and transgressive can it be if you can buy a bottle for $1.50 at the grocery store?), and second, it makes me worry that if I wear it in public, people will wonder why I smell like liquid smoke.

    Nevertheless, thumbs up because it does smell great and is unusual.

    02 December, 2009

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