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    Chanel1's avatar



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    Black by Puredistance

    The premium price for this ($295 for 60 ml) makes me want more. It smells a lot like MiN NY Scent Stories Dahab, which is similarly pricey, I think. There is something nice in these scents. I like the Dahab version a little more, I think.

    Having sampled more, I would say these are ok and interesting, but not really something I would want to wear often, or something I would recommend for others without sampling.

    18th April, 2015

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Aer by Angela Ciampagna

    Aer is not properly my archetype of concoction but I have to admit it smells utterly natural and realistically grassy-citric (in a way that is almost shocking, it seems to handle herbs, flowers and citrus for real. Incredibly oily is longly the part of skin on which I've layered the juice). Well, Aer is a grassy-aromatic (somewhat minty) take on the resinous vetiver theme. Kenzo Air effectively jumps on mind because of the association of mint, bergamot and vetiver but Aer is substantially another stuff, basically far more floral (it seems to detect chamomile and mimosa), far more citric (a stout "oily" lemony vibe connected with yellow flowers) and far more grassy resinous while the Kenzo's one (fragrance which I really like) is more properly minty-balsamic, "frosty" and "airy". There is finally a certain piquancy in the Angela Ciampagna's composition substantially diverse (despite yet present) in Kenzo Air (in the latter more "swarming-aereal" while in Aer somewhat botanic-culinary and yes, more aromatically mediterranean). While finally the Kenzo's one develops a final light dusty (vaguely incensey) ambery "background" Aer ends down basically resinous (stout elemi) and still floral herbal while I detect a more developed vetiver's feel in Kenzo Air. Anyway, several Meo Fusciuni's (or Testa Maura's) realistically green and culinary aromas jump on mind far more and I finally detect a really heady juniper berries presence and most of all an hesperidic/floral core influencing the final wake. The note of vetiver (still lemony, floral, salty, finally a touch smoky and piquant, close to the same presence in Terre d'Hermes or Duetto Parfums Citiver) emerges gradually and is far more evident after a couple of hours over the fist spray. If you are in to grassy/hesperidic/floral aromas and demand something uncompromisingly natural, well, don't go further, Aer is immensely enjoyable.

    17th April, 2015

    cacio's avatar

    United States United States

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    Kobako by Bourjois

    This is for the Osmotheque reconstruction, smelled on paper.

    Chanel Cuir de Russie plus cinnamon. This is a smooth, suede-like leather in the mold of Chanel Cuir de Russie (as opposed to the butch Tabac Blond tradition). The different is that this is not as big in the florals, as the Chanel is, but adds rather a smooth cinnamon. Plush and elegant.

    I have not smelled later reissues, but from other people's descriptions, I doubt they are particularly related to the original version.

    17th April, 2015

    flathorn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Hypnotic Poison Eau Secrète by Christian Dior

    Lighter is generally better for me when it comes to the Poisons because I was never a fan of its overbearing character though I like the smell. I've tried Hypnotic Poison and now this, hoping to find one I love. But so far that hasn't happened. I like eau Secrète better than Hypnotic Poison though. The caraway-play-doh note was taken out, which killed HP for me, and citrus added. It is less gourmand and comes across as more light and casually sweet.

    But Eau Secrète has a slight plasticine odor overlaying it, similar to the plastic vanilla Barbie Doll smell. That is a step up from the play-doh in HP, but I was hoping for no childhood notes. It relates so poorly to what I want my skin to smell like. So it really did not engage my skin. It's not unappealing like Hypnotic Poison was, but does little for me. 

    17th April, 2015

    flathorn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Hypnotic Poison by Christian Dior

    Caraway and play-doh heliotrope. I couldn't stand this on my skin. There is a weirdness to this note that isn't appealing at all. It also comes across as cheap glamour, trying too hard, without an understanding of what it is. A little pretentious. I tried it twice to see if it might change, but this is really what it's like on me. I like HP Eau Secrète better.

    17th April, 2015

    drseid's avatar

    United States United States

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    South by Mendittorosa

    South opens with a moderately sweet, almost transparent accord before quickly moving to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the sweetness drops to a more modest level, as a slightly sharp, clinical gauze-like synthetic fresh accord takes over. As the composition moves further through its middle, the gauze-like synthetic fresh accord adds in subtle spice and underlying natural smelling vague woods. During the late dry-down the clinical fresh accord gradually recedes as the now semi-transparent woods hang on through the finish. Projection is average and longevity below average at about 5 hours on skin.

    The first time I tried South on skin for an early read I described the experience rather negatively as smelling like "odd spice". Just like anything else, first impressions don't always prove true and I would say "odd spice" really is not the best descriptor of what I smell now with a full wearing. Instead, the best descriptor of the key heart accord is a very fresh, clinical, gauze-like rubbing alcohol experience. When wearing South, I almost feel like I was in a hospital or doctor's office, smelling the alcohol laden swabs and other sanitized instruments throughout. This sounds a lot worse than it is, and in fact there really is nothing wrong with the composition as I find it pretty mundane and easy to wear. The only question I have is "Would I want to smell like I just came out of a hospital or doctor's office?” In my case, the answer is a pretty solid, "No." The rubbing alcohol aspect coupled with the house trademark poor performance metrics (save, Le Mat) make South a rather benign, but unwanted composition that just doesn't seem to fit in with the "real world". The bottom line is the 185 Euro per 100ml bottle South is a competent release by Mendittorosa, but one that needs some warmth and heart, earning an above average 2.5 to 3 stars out of 5 and a neutral recommendation with a positive bias.

    17th April, 2015

    flathorn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Tea Rose by Perfumer's Workshop

    Self-flagellation in a bottle. I'm revisiting Tea Rose after trying it many years ago. It was that type of rose that had a really vile artificial metallic reaction on my skin. I recognized it as soon as I put it on. This one is beyond unwearable.
    When this first came out, there were several rose fragrances that used this same artificial rose, and they were all nose-searing. I haven't had a reaction to a rose fragrance like this in a long time. I assume the rose recreations now use different aroma chemicals. If so, they are much much better now. I occasionally come across a rose that smells synthetic and unpleasant, but not like Tea Rose.

    16th April, 2015 (Last Edited: 17th April, 2015)

    flathorn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Futur by Robert Piguet

    There is such a strong evocative feeling in Futur of an echo from the past that it makes its name a conundrum. This one speaks from the dimness of a different era, surrounded by time and trappings of a different sensibility. There is no electronic buzz in this one, no urban-ness, no city; no synthetic recreation (though in actuality there must be). This one exists in a time when our actual living space was less plastic, less electrical, less neon. It seems to belong on someone who still reads books.
    There is a lot of dark, rich, green soapiness and aldehydes in the start-up, a vegetal slightly frumpy cleanness, very comfortable, very unpretentious, but not without a sense of its own self. This is not a striving fragrance by any means, in spite of the aldehydes, which I wish were less. I know they give it part of its old soul character, but there is a touch of radiant sneezing in them also.
    Is this really a chypre? It has a darkness to it, many chypre notes, and is built like one, but for me chypre will always be about oakmoss, and Futur strikes me as having every element but oakmoss, which is interesting to me in its own right. It's been compared to Bandit a lot, which I love, and they share a certain dark air, but Bandit is drier, friskier and has such a different personality than Futur. Bandit is for adventure, while Futur is more grounded, for staying home in one's library.
    I really like Futur. It is fairly unique, is it's own person, and has a character I like to sit down and visit with, a fragrance that's comfortable with its little place in the world and has much comfortable conversation to share, and also a cup of tea.

    16th April, 2015 (Last Edited: 17th April, 2015)

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Opus 1144 by Unum

    Opus 1144 (assumedly the Gothic one) is paradoxically the most modern (and bright) among the Unum's compositions which are taking the world by storm by now on Basenotes. Actually, in spite of its granted underlined gothic inspiration (a luxuriant "ecclesial" and ceremonial "modern Gothic" and not a darkly medieval gloomy-mouldy one in my perception) and the inner french classicism lurking in the depths of background, there is en extraordinary modern twist welcoming the wearer, especially in its spicy-hesperidic "top assault" so rich of molecular stormy piquancy, sparkling-tart mandarine, talc/heliotrope and velvety interaction of wet luxurious resins, bergamot and turbulent floral powders. A stout note of bergamot (as by soon connected with a chypre depth of leathery-vanillic poudree amber) connects the aroma to a luxurious ambery-floral, powdery-woody and hesperidic-animalic-chypre tradition (a la Grossmith Phul-Nana, several Caron's a la Bellodgia or the modern Farmacia SS Annunziata's take on the theme due Chia or Cara) but at same time an intriguing (and exotic) game of gassy orchid, spicy-iris (nutmeg??), fizzy-spicy orangy patterns and peppery-viscous resins recalls a new contemporary daring pungent approach vaguely a la Baiana O.P.S.O or finally a la several "aerial" Amouage or MDCI, Etro, Reminiscence or Guerlain (partially Guerlain Bois d'Armenie and Shalimar Parfum Initial to quote several). I detect something undeniably exotic in the mix, something airy-silky, a cocktail of ylang-ylang, sweet spices, may be heliotrope and molecular orchid (a touch of vetiver too ??) really intriguing and dreamy (actually other than classically gothic in my perception, I mean anything but a darkly sulphureous or liturgical entity). The more the aroma develops the more its amalgam evolves significantly towards something rare, molecular, balsamic, dreamy, balmy, aerial and exotic (myrrh, copahu balm, elemi, tonka, fir resins, leather, benzoin, white musk, orchid, powdery vetiver, etc). The aromatic "white poudree-like" resins are heady in this phase for sure and all I detect is a general atmosphere of luxuriant "Palatin" (Parisian and Roman) decadence "costellated" of sweet candles, frescos, bronze armors, chiselled pots, cardinalates, massive frames, bas-relief and tapestries. Excellent and actually a new veritable "chypre palatin" creation.

    16th April, 2015 (Last Edited: 17th April, 2015)

    drseid's avatar

    United States United States

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    Omega by Mendittorosa

    Omega opens with a brief vanilla sweetened jasmine floral before quickly moving to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the jasmine all but fades, leaving the syrupy, moderately sweet vanilla remaining in support of an emerging strong synthetic smelling Oud wood with hints of cumin spice. During the late dry-down the synthetic woods vacate, leaving the vanilla now losing most of its earlier sweetness all by itself save faint hints of the jasmine remnants to finish off the composition's development. Projection is on the low side of average and longevity below average at about 5 hours on skin.

    Omega started off pretty decent with its early jasmine presentation, but things went downhill fast when the perfumer rolled out the near certainly norlimbanol derived synthetic smelling Oud Wood. This stuff dominated the rest of the composition's facets as it almost always does, making for an unimpressive mid-section to the perfume's development. The late dry-down while more pleasant is near-equally unimpressive as it pretty much consists of relatively dry vanilla with a hint of jasmine. Like most of the Mendittorosa compositions (save the superb Le Mat) it just doesn't have the structure needed to hold things up, and the composition again folds like a house of cards, providing terrible performance metrics, especially considering this is supposed to be an extrait concentration. The bottom line is the 185 Euro per 100ml bottle Omega is a bit of a synthetic smelling mess, earning a "below average" 2 to 2.5 stars out of 5 and a mild avoid recommendation ignoring price. If price were taken into account the avoid recommendation would be much stronger.

    16th April, 2015

    drseid's avatar

    United States United States

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    Cologne Indélébile by Editions de Parfums Frederic Malle

    Cologne Indelebile opens with a very natural smelling bergamot, neroli and orange blossom trio before moving to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the orange blossom remains in diminished form as underlying support for an emerging effervescent, slightly sharp lemon, yellow narcissus flower and clean detergent-like synthetic musk trio that takes over control, with the synthetic musk the most prominent. During the late dry-down the lemon and light synthetic musk blend together, sans effervescence as the orange blossom gradually grows back into a co-starring role through the finish. Projection is average, but longevity is outstanding (especially for an Eau de Cologne) at over 15 hours on skin.

    This was a blind buy that I really didn't know what to expect. I knew the nose behind the composition, Ropion, when "on" is the best in the business and does his best work under Malle's direction. Aside from the nose and that the composition was an Eau de Cologne I knew little else going in... When I sprayed Cologne Indelebile on skin the first time, I thought I might be in for a very traditional Eau de Cologne, as the natural smelling bergamot and neroli that primarily open things up are very traditional indeed. Once the composition entered its early heart, thoughts of a traditional style Eau de Cologne quickly evaporated, as Ropion shifts gear to a synthetic clean laundry detergent-like musk focus, with significant sharp effervescent lemon and narcissus flower joining in. It is difficult to describe the overall effect, but the closest composition I can think of in *spirit* to this is Mark Birley for Men. During the late dry-down, the orange blossom makes a reappearance, as it joins with the lemon and the white musk, now all melded as one without the detergent and effervescent aspects, settling in for a very long lasting, sublime finish. I suspect that this is going to be a "love it" or "hate it" kind of composition. For one, the composition gets a pretty heavy dose of the synthetic white musk, especially during the early heart section which may be too much for some and indeed, I had some trouble with it myself. It is really not "challenging" per se, but rather a bit over-the-top for a time when paired with the narcissus floral. Once the narcissus vacates leaving the orange blossom to reemerge joining the lemon and musk things get much better. Another potential downside is while the heavy use of musk is an interesting facet that separates Cologne Indelebile from most others in the Eau de Cologne genre, at the end of the day it still is an Eau de Cologne without a whole bunch of interesting twists and turns along the way, making for a less innovative outing than one might expect from Editions de Parfums. On the whole, however, the positives far outweigh the negatives making Cologne Indelebile an excellent option in the genre, especially for those who want an Eau de Cologne style composition, but want much better performance metrics. The bottom line is the $260 per 100ml bottle Cologne Indelebile is an interesting, slightly innovative take on the genre composed by the best nose in the business but at the end of the day it is still an Eau de Cologne, earning a "very good" 3.5 stars out of 5 and a solid recommendation. As an aside, it should be mentioned that while the price being charged is extremely high in relative terms for an Eau de Cologne, when one considers that *this* Eau de Cologne has longevity exceeding many extraits, the price is not as outlandish as one might initially believe.

    16th April, 2015

    flathorn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Escale à Pondichéry by Christian Dior

    Graceful, light and sparkling. Black tea with a bergamot top, so it is an Earl Grey tea opening. After the bergamot dries off, it still stays refreshing and bright. Pondichery is very balanced, with just the right notes filling in right where they need to be. The pale sandalwood drydown echoes the tea notes as it dries off. It has a subtle sophistication that's really welcome in a transparent breezy summer fragrance. Not long lasting.

    16th April, 2015

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Hatria by Angela Ciampagna

    Hatria represents my first approach with this new quite interesting italian brand. First of all I'd like to underline the immense (carefree and bright) politeness of Angela Ciampagna which is a young talented creative and furthermore a really likeable (and joyful) person. Hatria is a moderately caramellous (especially in its top part) hyper delicate but complex accord of saffron (the note which I first of all detect), rose and oud, overall surrounded by a plenty of aromatic, floral, balmy-spicy and musky nuances (progressively detectable along the gradually evolving articulated process). The central stage of the evolution is still hallmarked by a rosey spicy agarwood presence before a more balmy (somewhat yummy/honeyed/fruity/chocolatey/floral) and sublime light creaminess starts mastering the stage with irresistible delicacy. The dry down is indeed less soapy-vegetal and more subtle, balmy, mild and restrained, something absolutely elegant, discreet, sensual and delightful in its floral-spicy-creamy afforded subtleness. I've in my experience yet tested dozens oud-rose spicy combos around (Montale, Dueto Parfums, By Kilian etc) and I can say that, in spite of many (probably the most part) basically (anyway longly) medicinal, "gassy" or straightforward woody-rosey experiments, Hatria is finally driven (at the end of its evolution) to evolve towards a superbly balmy and spicy state of olfactory sublimation concretized in to "an ostensible agarwood resin effect disappearance". Beautiful for real.

    15th April, 2015 (Last Edited: 17th April, 2015)

    flathorn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Barbara Bui by Barbara Bui

    There was the potential for a well-made, versatile fragrance. But it turned on my skin and became unwearable because of an unpleasant synthetic vibe. Not quite department store hairspray, yet one that is still familiar to me, which emerges on certain higher end fragrances, and become underlaid by the ambiance of a chemical cloud. Notes of the original fragrance come in and out of this cloud, but it's not the thing I am looking for from my fragrance.

    15th April, 2015 (Last Edited: 17th April, 2015)

    drseid's avatar

    United States United States

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    Alfa by Mendittorosa

    Alfa opens with a touch of floral jasmine before quickly moving to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the mild jasmine fades to the background as a heavy black pepper note emerges to take control of the composition with significant aromatic saffron spice and synthetic vague woody support. During the late dry-down the relatively weak base is near solely derived of semi-dry sandalwood, with faint traces of the black pepper remaining well in the background. Projection is on the low side of average and longevity below average at about 5 hours on skin.

    Alfa's black pepper driven heart accord has been done more times than I can even think about, and quite frankly much better. The combination of the black pepper, saffron and mild jasmine with the synthetic woods (can anyone say "norlimbanol"?) somewhat resembles the primary heart accord of Declaration by Cartier in spirit (and a number of other similar compositions). Probably my favorite part of Alfa's development is its simplistic stark sandalwood late dry-down, but the base is so weak you barely can smell it except up close. I am afraid there is no getting around the reality (at least to this reviewer) that Alfa is just not particularly distinctive and lacks the solid base structure needed to succeed. The bottom line is the 185 Euro per 100ml bottle Alfa just can't separate itself from others in the field with its overplayed peppery heart and poor performance metrics, earning a very "average" 2.5 stars out of 5 and a neutral rating. I would look at far superior compositions like the great Tzora by Anat Fritz before buying this one.

    15th April, 2015

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Onsen by MiN New York

    Finally the first MiN scent I like, and aside from my personal taste, that I “objectively” find compelling, solid, “finished” and mature. It smells nice and unlike most of the others among this line, it smells like if someone actually put some care and creativity until the very last try before the final version. Basically for me this is a really interesting sort of contemporary mint-woody-ambery scent with a sweet, slightly creamy but at the same time woody-salty base which I guess contains notes of anise and vetiver. Perfectly blended with a crisp, bracing fresh top accord of mint, sharp balsamic pine notes, citrus, maybe other tart aromatic herbs like basil – “invigorating balsamic greenness”, shortly. So far, it may sound a quite conventional, astringent-balmy green-citrus scent with some added woodiness; the thing I enjoy is that they manage to “fit in” a truly pleasant and extremely sophisticated accord of smoky-musky and “ash-y” amber, with a slight nutty aftertaste. Quite subtle but definitely distinctive, providing a really enjoyable feel of mellow, velvety “grey roundness” to the blend. And it does not clash at all with the overall “transparent” and sharp balsamic-green mood; on the contrary it provides just a subtle shade of refined, slightly dark and dusty warmth – warm yet aloof - which goes just irresistibly good with the rest.

    As others have noted Onsen shows quite a meticulous minimalistic work, which doesn’t mean the scent is light; just discreet, simple, yet creative and extremely refined – a whispered, quiet type of refinement. Vaguely reminiscent of some 2000s designers though (and a couple of deodorants too, but I want to skip that for once), but in a positive way; it smells like taking just some of that, well blending it with a “niche” approach. Maybe because I wore it the other day but it reminds me of Paul Smith London for instance; or better say, a “depleted” version of it, taking away basically all the creamy-sweet powderinesss (not entirely though; leaving just a grain here). Onsen smells like the olfactory portrait of some wealthy yuppie’s avantgarde “all-concrete” mansion in the deep woods; greenish and mineral grey, breezy and slightly pretentiously sophisticated, an artificial structure cleverly integrated into a natural ambiance. Or even better, the sculpture “Mirror House” by Altenburger, as Onsen does indeed contain a beautiful slight “metallic-glass” feel. Linear drydown, a bit cheaper than the way more interesting early stages, mostly focused on a citrusy-musky synthetic amber-woody note which may easily become a bit boring... but nonetheless, pretty well done overall for me.

    7,5/10

    15th April, 2015

    alfarom's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Atramental by Room 1015

    If you like modern leathery fragrances with an industrial / urban vein, Atramental's opening will definitely deliver what it promises. It does it via a saffron plus synthetic leather accord with black pepper and astringent citruses enhancing the general austerity. Yes, it's a trendy type of accord you would totally expect from Comme Des Garçons and the likes but it still works because, somehow, it doesn't feel like a rip-off. On one side it feels cold and dark, almost robotic while on the other it shows some warmness provided by ambery resins and spices. The cardamom note breaks in pretty soon and, all of a sudden, there's a nice sense of deja-vu…Somehwere between a modernized Declaration by Cartier and a warmer version of Humiecki & Graef's Askew with something of the dark incense base of CDG Black.

    Nice and very reasonably priced too.

    15th April, 2015

    flathorn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Volutes by Diptyque

    Volutes worked really well on my skin. I'm not a gourmand lover, but on me, the sweetness turned to richness, the wonderful opopanax and iris powders to warmth, the spice and subtle tobacco, to depth and vibrancy. It was strong on start-up, but smelled delicious. The florals didn't really stand out - they were fairly submerged with the spices and honey notes, which made Volutes all the better for me. Around midnote it started getting lighter and turned smooth and creamy. The spices seemed to meld into the composition, so the dry down was kind of soft and spicy. The dry down, my favorite part, lingered a long time. I woke up the next morning smelling a beautiful powdered light spiciness on my skin.

    15th April, 2015

    alfarom's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    La Collection Croisiere : Jangala by Pierre Guillaume

    Jangala is most definitely my personal standout amongst the new Guillame's Croisiere Collection. A lactonic non-gorumand coconut paired to a thin, and yet quite remarkable, balsamic eucalyptus note while a cleverly dosed ozonic accord provides transparent facets without driving the fragrance towards the aquatic. It sounds odd but it really works. it's an effortlessly original opening that's both exotic and unique while avoiding to result either over the top or weird. One of those accords that you smell once and you don't forget.

    The drydown is more conventional but still pretty enjoyable. A light-handed woody base that with its cold minty-vanillic facets is not too far removed from Fahrenheit 32...only smoother and more creamy. All in all, this is a quiet, close to the skin fragrance with a nice sense of restraint that's easy to like and even easier to wear.

    Very nice.

    15th April, 2015

    Kaern's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Intense He Wood by Dsquared2

    Seems to me to be a completely superfluous flanker that doesn't really improve on the original or the other flankers.

    Maybe the word 'Intense' sells?

    I don't really like the violet notes used here , but the cedar and vetiver drydown is totally acceptable and wearable.

    Rather than the intense moniker given, it all seems a bit predictable and tame.

    15th April, 2015

    Kaern's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Eau de Cartier : Vétiver Bleu by Cartier

    Horrible blue liquid that smells of mint mouthwash.

    Not a patch on Roadster

    15th April, 2015

    Kaern's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Dunhill Icon by Dunhill

    The first 20-30 seconds of Icon are lovely -- a very nice bergamot.

    Then, for me, it all falls apart very badly. I am not sure what accord is causing this overriding smell of a rather sweet orangey bubblegum, but that is what I perceive. I actually can't detect any of the base notes listed.

    This is where Dunhill and I part company for good

    For pre-pubescent youths only.

    15th April, 2015

    Buzzlepuff's avatar

    United States United States

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    Sir by D.S. & Durga

    I acquired a bottle of Sir as part of my collection of dark masculine fragrances which I have been exploring lately. From the first sniff I assumed this was going to be another patchouli and amber combination fragrance. There are some great patchouli ambers that D.S.& Durga would have to reach for to find acceptability in this sub genre dominated by Mazzolari Patchouli and the more leathery Lui. The patchouli is noticeable immediately along with a benzoin heavy combination with labdanum for a dull but masculine amber with a slight hint at oak moss - probably just a hint. The patchouli is softened by the traditional citrus opening but the inner harmony of this masculine juice is modulated further with warmth of rose, mandarin and a lyrical jasmine. The blended notes of the fragrance looses the bold masculine stance that it might have had if it remained loyal to the patchouli roots. Sir looses its way toward destiny with all the variety of notes that make a pleasant soup of warm notes that is no longer a patchouli fragrance but a warm toasted resinous masculine varnish of notes. Pleasant, but not great. I would rate Sir 6 of 10 stars, and although I like the general tone of the fragrance it is not the exceptional potion I was hoping for. I am sure I will wear it now and again and enjoy it. But there is no greatness here.

    15th April, 2015

    drseid's avatar

    United States United States

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    Le Mat by Mendittorosa

    Le Mat opens with a boozy whiskey-like accord before quickly moving to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart it turns highly aromatic as radiant patchouli joins powerful burnt sugar-like immortelle. Moving in and out of the aromatic patchouli and immortelle starring tandem through the composition's middle are whiffs of smoky black tea with perhaps just an additional hint of airy bergamot. During the late dry-down the patchouli and immortelle both recede, eschewing their aromatic facet as their remnants pair with a light, natural smelling woody accord through the finish. Projection is excellent, and longevity very good at about 10 hours on skin.

    *Now* we are talking... After having been somewhat disappointed by the prior two Mendittorosa compositions, I went into wearing Le Mat with lowered expectations. Of course, just when one expects a middling result, you instead get a winner. The first thing that became clear early in the composition's development was Le Mat has some real potency. The patchouli and immortelle starring tandem for most of the composition's development features very interesting aromatic aspects of both, and the fact that I enjoyed the pairing is saying something as this is coming from one who can't stand immortelle generally. Through the mid-section adding to the already interesting aromatic pairing were unexpected facets like the smoky black tea that would pop in and out. The late dry-down is the time most of the other Mendittorosa compositions near-completely fell apart, but happily *not* Le Mat. When I saw "blond woods" in the official base note ingredient list I feared my arch-nemesis, cashmeran, would make an unwanted appearance late, but if it is in the composition, I didn't detect it, instead the woods while light and somewhat vague smelled completely believable, relatively transparent and highly pleasant. At the end of the day, Le Mat succeeds where the rest of the Mendittorosa compositions to one degree or another fail; it smells good, it is interesting and it has good performance. The bottom line is the 198 Euros per 100ml bottle Le Mat is a very different and desirable take on patchouli and immortelle, earning an "excellent" 4 stars out of 5 and a strong recommendation. Finally, an immortelle composition I want to own.

    14th April, 2015

    Wild Gardener's avatar

    France France

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    Parfum Sacré by Caron

    An intriguing blast of civet and a weird over-ripe fruit thing
    followed by a procession of mainly sweet notes until
    everything dissolves into vanilla milkshake.

    Parfum Sucré

    14th April, 2015

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Just Cavalli Gold for Him by Roberto Cavalli

    The number 100 recent attempt to retrace the Dior Homme Intense's (and One Million's) commercial trend despite the plain differences between Just Cavalli Gold for Him and the Dior's one (or Paco Rabanne's one as well). I detect powdery woods (mostly synthetic cedarwood), plenty of cardamom, sweet spices (mostly nutmeg and cinnamon I suppose), cappuccino (the stand out coffee/cocoa-driven "effect") and a touch (just a somewhat ideal touch) of leather. Finally not so far from Valentino Uomo (at least conceptually and also partially aromatically). Vetiver jumps out smoothly along the dry down as soon as the initial dusty piquancy starts receding. Decent concoction (the classic generally mass appealing type of juice) but nothing I'd ever rush to purchase. The dry down is delicate, sweetly spicy (not overly sweet) and chocolatey. A "teen agers" winner I suppose.
    P.S: really durable on my skin, after many hours the leather emerges and I detect points of connection with the YSL L'Homme Parfum Intense's dry down (partially also L'Erbolario Corteccia jumps on mind).

    14th April, 2015

    buyers_remorse's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Loverdose Tattoo by Diesel

    Gives you a headache and cloying sickness, full of roses, and sweetness sickly sweet and cloying and so wrong! This is awful and I cant believe people don't need to go straight to a pharmacy for paracetamols and smelling salts to clear their head. Awful Awful frag! YUK!

    14th April, 2015

    kinkajou45's avatar



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    Iris Poudre by Editions de Parfums Frederic Malle

    I love this perfume. It's long lasting and (on me) fresh, but very sensual. I don't know that I'd recommend it for those who enjoy the more "modern" fragrances despite its recent creation date. To me Iris Poudre is closer to the traditional/antique scents.


    14th April, 2015

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Lavs by Unum

    After such accurate and passionate reviews previously appointed by my two talented friends (and highly generous master-reviewers) Alfarom and Colin Maillard is not properly easy to add further interesting elements or digressions in order to describe the qualities of this amazing new Unum's fragrance. My expectations (absolutely at the end not disappointed) were therefore so high and I was furthermore intrigued first of all considering the original (far away from the olfactory market and the self-care/beauty/aesthetics universe) provenience, utilization and nature of the L.A.V.S "liquids" (as well as yet specified, applied in order to perfume tabernacles and to gently "moisturize" sacramental garments and vestments supplied by the atelier L.A.V.S to the ecclesial and episcopal/papal ambience) but also according with my particular predilection for everything smelling resinous, incensey, holy/sacramental and somewhat connected with anything spiritual, gothic, mystic and ghostly (and last but not least considered the artistic Filippo Sorcinelli's cooperation with Cererie Terenzi and with the immensely talented "and spiritual" perfumer/traveller Paolo Terenzi). So, what we are going to experience is inevitably a "really liturgical/sacramental" potion with a tremendously incisive evocative power (especially for people grown up in the middle of a "southern" Catholic culture with its resurrections, liturgies and catechisms). The opening is stunning and you get immediately back a dreamy child with a white vest and a candle in the hands. The impact is bewildering despite I have yet experienced on skin dozens of high quality frankincense centered concoctions. What strikes me immediately along the Lavs's top notes is the "liquid-rosey-soapy-vaguely medicinal" consistency and (at once) the really oily lucid stickiness on skin (but not yet on the olfactory sphere). I mean, the soapy-incensey aroma is immensely realistic but substantially bright, dry, fresh, aqueous and aerial. I'm of course sure all this aqueous (ostensibly chamomile-driven) piquant brightness (lightness) is mainly provided by the interaction of fresh spices (cardamom in particular), elemi, soapy-medicinal cloves and aromatic elements (coriander in particular). I detect a peppery molecular storminess (almost fizzy and somewhat freshly soapy all around..., Heeley Cardinal jumps on mind more than CdG Avignon and most of all more than Jovoy La Liturgie des Heures in this phase). In a while a more "sticky" density (moderately appointed anyway) exhaling from a stout ambergris/labdanum/opoponax accord starts "restraining" (actually barely thickening) the aroma which gets morphing towards a slightly more densely incensey and resinous sort of dimension actually closer to scents a la Santi Burgas Loence, Jovoy La Liturgie des Heures and partially La Via del Profumo Mecca Balsam. The central stage is surprisingly the most "compact" of the whole development since, after this more properly musky/resinous/ambery stage, anyway the note of frankincense comes back to be central and fluidy, all the further elements being swirling around as mere accessorial "pics". Overall smells about Catholicism, midnight masses and Eucharist, all is hyper-realistic, all is properly true and melancholically childish, the note of frankincense is straight to the point (un-floral, un-gourmant, un-rooty, un-herbal, un-affected), spiritual, dense and smooth (never particularly smouldering or burning), basically far from the waxy/boise (resins from the forests) colder orthodox type of frankincense. I still detect a rosey-laundry-soapy background and this is the measure of how much the note of "un-treated/un-affected" frankincense is really central, being woods, musks, amber and impalpable floral notes just a "surrounding olfactory background". I can say at this point that Lavs is all about frankincense and fresh-liquid spices, a vivid, penetrating, crisp, aromatic piece of sacramental liquid with a surprisingly measured "implementation" of resins, woods and musks, namely a frankincense-oriented freshly/aromatic potion (while Loence -one of the last frankincense-based potions I've tried- was smooth, warm, balsams veined and suede-like velvety. Thumbs up with no hesitation.

    14th April, 2015

    Sakral's avatar



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    Let Me Play The Lion by LesNez

    To me this is a fantasy fragrance. A futuristic incense, with bright raspy wood, uplifting spice and i also get some kind of candy i can't put my finger on... A bit licouricy, but with a boozy tang.
    A densely mixed synthetic cocktail which is much more interesting than the sum of it's parts, i find it completely delicious.

    The sillage leaves some to be desired, but on the other hand i kind of like keeping it like a secret on my wrist which can entertain my imagination every now and then.

    14th April, 2015

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