Latest Fragrance Reviews, Updated Daily

    Showing 271 to 300 of 665.
    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Sunflowers by Elizabeth Arden

    Innocuous enough, pleasant green floral from Arden.

    It does have a plastic under scent that can give it a "cheap" feeling. I am most reminded of Arden's other paean to the fields, Blue Grass, which it resembles.

    Nothing at all special, and therefore highly affordable.

    Top notes: Lemon, Rosewood, Neroli, Mandarin
    Middle notes: Cyclamen, Muguet, Rose, Jasmine, Orris
    Base notes: Cedar, Musk, Amber, Moss

    Nothing to go out of your way for.

    10th July, 2014

    Jenna's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    Si Lolita Eau de Minuit by Lolita Lempicka

    Two words- "intensely intoxicating", is how a stranger described this scent, with his wife chiming in, "It's okay, he's not wrong, it is." I rarely fail to have someone comment on this fragrance when I wear it and up until this, I never thought strangers routinely commented on someone's fragrance, despite stories to the contrary.

    This is my signature fragrance, I absolutely love it. I was a fan of Lolita Lempicka's namesake fragrance but this, this beats that out by far. I first fell in love with the original version of this fragrance, Si Lolita, but it doesn't hold a candle to this version.

    Si Lolita Eau de Minuit contains my favorite fragrance notes, all perfectly combined. Sweet pea, pink pepper, elemi, patchouli (light), with a touch of vanilla that is just barely there.
    What I would describe as a wonderful, just can't get enough, animalic scent.

    Does fragrance get any better than pepper, elemi and vanilla?
    I think not, save for perhaps one with a great note of vetiver.

    10th July, 2014

    tempest moon's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Mugler Cologne by Thierry Mugler

    Theirry Mugler's Cologne is a modern, decidedly futuristic take on a classic recipe. His inspiration was the scent of a Moroccan soap he came across whilst on holiday.

    I'll be honest, this does indeed smell exactly like soap (no surprise)! When I smell this I am reminded of an exclusively made luxury soap bar in a hotel bathroom. I find it very refreshing and uplifting.

    I basically get a very sweet, green citrus vibe, coupled with a heavy dose of clean, white musk. I think I also get a faint hint of Vetiver, although it isn't listed. It's not a bitter at all to my nose (unlike other types of Eau de Cologne's). Instead it's very smooth, and not in any way sharp smelling or overpowering.

    I don't think I really have anything bad to say about this. I do get the slight "synthetic" feel which others have mentioned, but even then it still achieves it's goal of smelling clean, fresh and inoffensive. This is the one I reach for when I don't want to smell "complicated", just clean and ready for the day ahead.

    Well done to M. Mugler for coming up with this. His aim here was to create a perfume "for people who don't like the smell of perfume". It's simple and does that job very well. It's a modern, fresh take on what is (in my opinion) a very old and conventional formula, which has been repeated too many times. This doesn't feel like it belongs with the rest of them. Completely fresh, unisex and modern as ever. I like it.

    10th July, 2014

    SnowStorm's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    Gucci Guilty pour Homme by Gucci

    The scent is pleasant but doesn't have good longevity or projection. The notes are very static (it doesn't change over time). I don't dislike it but dont' pick it as a frag very often. Glad I only got the little travel version.

    10th July, 2014

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Eden by Cacharel

    This is not subtle!

    It is so many things to so many reviewers, but the one thing it is not is subtle.

    Old-fashioned strong and long-lasting (the Lutens type of strength), this is for me a sweet, cold, minty green, fruity floral. That's its problem, it tries to be too many things at once.

    It is original. I will give it that. Barbara Herman thought it a "big gourmand oriental." She noted a sour plastic herbal note that for her predominated. I do not find this note, lucky for me.

    I put this in the scent type usually referred derogatorily as "old lady," over-powering, sweet, floral onslaught - "you can smell her from the lobby when she's still in her taxi at the curb."

    Herman's note file is different from Basenotes:

    Top: Bergamot, Lemon, Mandarin, Peach, Tarragon, Neroli
    Middle: Tuberose, Jasmine, Muguet, Rose, Ylang Ylang, Orris
    Base: Cedar, Patchouli, Sandalwood, Musk, Moss, Vanilla, Tonka, Amber

    Turin called it "wet cashmere" and gave it 4 stars, typing it as "sweet green."

    The thing I like most about it is the minty green coldness of it. It's refreshing on a hot day, but a little bit goes a long way, as you can well imagine.

    I can't give it a thumbs up, because it is just too overdone for my tastes, but it is certainly well done for its type of sweet over the top floral melange.

    10th July, 2014

    ClaireV's avatar

    Ireland Ireland

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Hanbury by Maria Candida Gentile

    It opens up on a startling note of pink bubblegum, which is apparently due to the calycanthus in this composition. Calycanthus, or so-called "sweetshrub" in laymen's terms, is an insignificant shrubby plant with attractive purple flowers whose smell is halfway between grape/strawberry (hence the bubblegum effect) and a light, fruity red wine. Although I am not a fan of bubblegum notes in general, I have to say that it adds a juvenile, happy-go-lucky air that is quite in character with the cheerful, sunny nature of this scent as a whole.

    The heart of the perfume puts the wearer straight into the gardens after which it is named - a very lush and natural setting by the rocky cliffs near the Costa Azzurra. The blend of green-tinged neroli, bitter orange and creamy sweet orange feels voluptuous without the slight sleaziness I often pick up in other orange blossom-centered scents. It is not indolic in the slightest, making it a versatile wear even in the hottest of climates. It does veer towards the edge of extreme sweetness at times, but I find that there is something here - the lime? mimosa? - always ready to pull it back before it crosses the line. There is a slight pinch of bitterness running through it that cuts the natural soapiness of orange blossoms in just the right way. Very natural-smelling, refined, and balanced.

    10th July, 2014

    jplaura02's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    Gianfranco Ferré for Man by Gianfranco Ferré

    A real surprise. Unlike many of the monster scents of the 1980's in that it never is too strong or pungent. From the opening citrus notes, it changes to a floral that is unique and then finishes with a an oakmoss and vetiver, supported by a beautiful sandalwood. I paid 20 dollars for 4.2 ounces of this amazing scent on ebay! Love it beyond words! It has to be the bargain of my lifetime. Only hope Ferre never stops making it. Truly sophisticated and unlike any of the other 65 fragrances that I own. A supreme masterpiece!

    10th July, 2014

    rbaker's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    Boss Nuit pour Femme by Hugo Boss

    A synthetic and dull sweety peachy opening with a generic floral drydown that leads into a laboratory-wood base. Not unpleasant but dull with really with little merit, including a shortevity of less than three hours on my skin.

    10th July, 2014

    Sly2scents's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Lumière Noire pour Homme by Maison Francis Kurkdjian

    Nothing special jumps out at me for this fragrance. I found this dull and boring a little cinnamon a generous dosage of spices for some strange reason I don't pick up the patchouli. On the upside it does last on my skin.

    10th July, 2014

    rbaker's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    XXX Large by Etienne Aigner

    The opening blast I get is that if lemon, a hint of bergamot and touch of a deeper, amber and lavender background. The drydown is characterised initially by floral impressions, a bit like geranium, but increasing taking a salty, ozonic and maritime turn that prevails until the end, although it is pushed into the background by an emerging synthetic wood note in the base. This is not a very exciting scent, it is pedestrian so to speak, but quite solidly made and not bad overall. Acceptable silage and limited projection are combined with a good longevity of about seven hours. On the border between neutral and positive scores, its comparative generic nature tilts it towards neutral overall.

    10th July, 2014

    bFlay's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    One Man Show by Jacques Bogart

    I love Jacques Bogart fragrances and trust the name. This though is "just alright". One Man Show is very green, but not fresh and crisp. This presents more of a vegetal/herbal quality. Secondary notes of roses and woods are muddled beneath the herbaceous top notes. Eventually (an hour or so into wear) a more pronounced woodsy/cedar and nutmeg accord sort of floats up and out adding interest. Lasts 5-7 hours on skin and clothes.

    10th July, 2014

    bFlay's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Vaniteck by Molinard

    Quite nice...and pleasingly peculiar! Vaniteck evokes thoughts of vanilla/sandalwood candles. Just a bit too intensely scented for most people to wear perhaps, but just as easily interpreted as "bold". Also could be a bit too chemical for personal wear, but sparingly applied, this is a unique treat. Projects nicely and dries down softly while lasting well over 7 hours.

    10th July, 2014

    sunny82's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Le Vetyver by Lubin

    I like this. It has a nice blast of green but smoky vetiver. I like that it has both elements. The middle notes were a bit heavy on the cedar for me. I like cedar but it really over powered the vetiver.
    Le Vetiver is the first scent that I have tried that illustrates what I understand to be a linear fragrance. About 5 minutes in, I am getting the spice notes. It's not my favorite vetiver, but it seems to be high quality and multidimensional.

    10th July, 2014

    tropicalstorm's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    Ungaro III by Ungaro

    Dark, flowery (without the sweetness) -in fact a good blend of spirits and aromatic flowers. The main notes are (bitter) rose with a whiff of lavender at the start mixed with vodka creating an interesting blend referred by some on here as "mysterious". Drydown is "mysterious" as well with a complex blend of flowers and a hint of wood and mild traces of spices.

    Interesting but not unique. Excessively eulogised by some fellow reviewers. I'd suggest that you try it on first- avoid blind buying this one.

    Longevity is a major issue on my skin and I note that I'm not the only one complaining.

    Anything I loved? Yes, the bottle!

    10th July, 2014

    FumeHood's avatar

    Brazil Brazil

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Explosions d’Emotions : Skin On Skin by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    Nice, but in the end this is Master D's Traversee du Bosphore, without the Apple. The realization of the leather/suede notes in both are very similar, as is their sweetness and boozy qualities. Other shared notes of Iris, Rose, and Musks are so paralleled that Skin on Skin ultimately ends up feeling redundant to me. This is not to detract from its qualities, however. Skin on Skin does last longer and is a safer unisex. It is a bit sweeter than Traversee, however, as Skin on Skin holds onto the sweetness throughout (while the Traversee actually sours... as in green apple... an hour into its evolution). SoS is a good addition for those looking for a boozy floral suede with incredible warmth, but will certainly be too sweet and powdery for many. Test first!

    10th July, 2014

    Izzie's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    Allure Homme Sport by Chanel

    I realize this is a masculine release, and it's not a particularly feminine-smelling fragrance. On most people, that is. I've smelled this on men and found it perfectly pleasant, citrusy and fresh and clean. Good. I'd recommend it to any man looking for a fresh all-round fragrance that's not going to offend anyone.
    But on my skin, this somehow turns into a pretty white musk/citrus floral. On me, it smells very feminine. And very good, so I like it. So, I'd also recommend it to any woman looking for a good fresh scent that doesn't smell like a fruit salad, if this does on your skin what it does on mine.

    10th July, 2014 (Last Edited: 09 July, 2014)

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Olympia Music Hall by Histoires de Parfums

    Olympia Music Hall is effectively like a tumultuous concert of diverse elements. Its perfume unveils by soon the suede and articulately performs with no reserves an Histoires de Parfums' s "trademark" main accord (which we can enjoy in to a similar way "dealing" with the darker Patroleum and Rosam), namely a sort of "vintage" evocative ambery-resinous leather accord surrounded by herbal, hesperidic, rosey and dusty-spicy patterns. I suppose the standout HdP's recurrent accord could possibly be centered (also in this case) over a stout amber/suede, dark patchouli, fundamental saffron, animalic patterns (civet and amber in particular), woodsy resins, vintage glorious bergamot and languid rose. A bunch of diverse further elements whirl around this main elusive and somewhat "stuffy" backbone (as going on in this case) and a "fizzy" lilac/freesia/peony presence provides for a while fresh-citric brightness. Dusty dry spices unfold by soon a turbulent molecular motion. I actually detect in here a sort of "chyprey" molecular (yes aerial) amber/suede which in Olympia sounds effectively brighter than in Petroleum, namely more properly floral (especially at the beginning), citric and musky with a touch of final powdery/resinous suede joined with chocolate (cocoa beans). In this case the opening is effectively almost sparkling, aldehydic, bright and dusty with its valzer of aqueous floral patterns, citrus and fresh spices overall by soon morphing towards the previous rosey-ambery typical animalic central accord (I detect civet) which in this case seems to "sound" less dark/woody/resinous and more floral-hesperidic despite the final bed of light frankincense and powdery chypre patterns. The frankincense amalgamates nicely with chocolate in order to produce a delicious smooth soapy (but slightly dirty due to a civet/licorice influence which I detect) dry down. Personally I like this variegated aroma, the fragrance is complex in evolution and multifaceted, I don't see problems with its wearability but have to admit I find it (as well as Rosam and Petroleum) more enjoyable for intimate wearings in the course of indoor cozy evening than for sociable nights out up in the naughty crowd.
    Ps: the dry down appears dark, resinous and musky-cocoa veined by have to say that (in comparison with Patroleum for instance) there is a more lifely (and "fluidy") citric/floral background still emerging from the dark-chypre "shadow".

    09 July, 2014 (Last Edited: 10th July, 2014)

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Zino Davidoff by Davidoff

    Genre: Woody Oriental

    Zino Davidoff starts out with a very bold lavender and citrus accord that recalls old-school standards like Bois du Portugal, The Third Man, and even Jicky (without the civet). Some sweet spices and woods join in over the next few minutes, followed quickly by a very rich and rounded rose note. Settling into its heart, Zino Davidoff becomes a sweetened rose and wood scent, seasoned with geranium and resting on an oriental base of vanilla and smooth sandalwood.

    Zino Davidoff does not turn soapy as it dries down, as does Bois du Portugal, nor does it veer toward hyper-masculine leather in the manner of, say, Antaeus. It seems to me instead quite balanced - even classical - in its poised approach to the woody oriental genre. Granted, Zino Davidoff is potent, especially in its first few minutes, but it evolves into a versatile and wearable scent that's far less overwhelming than its oriental successors Opium, A*Men, Le Mâle, and Pi. These days Zino Davidoff is underused, under-rated, and deserving of a wider public.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Zeste Mandarine Pamplemousse by Creed

    Genre: Citrus

    Amiable, if unremarkable orange top notes quickly give way to a pallid grapefruit reconstruction. An admixture of cilantro renders the scent marginally interesting - at least until the soapy, sour floral drydown sets it. Unfortunately this occurs at the fifteen two twenty minute mark, from which point on Zeste Mandarine Pamplemousse is merely dull and mildly unpleasant. In this context, the fragrance’s lack of potency and longevity could be considered advantageous.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Zen (original / black) by Shiseido

    Genre: Floral

    Smelling Zen Classic for the first time is a revelation. I find it hard to fathom that this scent was released in 1964. Even now, nearly fifty years later, it smells not only utterly original, but absolutely contemporary. Sampling it blind, I’d have no trouble believing it the latest entry from Eau d’Italie, Frédéric Malle, or Parfumerie Générale – even a new addition to Chanel’s Les Exclusifs. Its arrival at so early a date resets my perspective on the history of fragrance.

    Zen Classic is built on an oddly austere dry rose accord, smoky, phenolic woods and resins, and a warm, faintly animalic musk. True to its name, Zen Classic strikes a perfect balance on several fronts: between the elegance of its rose and the animalic
    warmth of its musk; between the darkness of smoke and the subdued glow of labdanum; between the dry bitterness of woods and the sweetness of floral notes and resins; between power and transparency.

    While I smell no frankincense in Zen, its reliance upon woods, its predominantly dark tint, and its overall mood and texture align it more closely with contemporary incense-rose compositions like Paestum Rose and Cabaret than with Paris, Knowing, or the other huge fruity rose chypres of the intervening decades. It’s as if perfume evolution skipped ahead by nearly a half a century.

    With its exquisitely poised equilibrium, Zen Classic transcends not only time, but olfactory gender boundaries. I’d certainly have no problem wearing it in public, nor do I imagine would any male who’s comfortable with dandified “masculine” rose scents like Hammam Bouquet or Czech & Speake No. 88, most of which are far less subtle and refined Zen.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    parfums*PARFUMS Series 3 Incense: Zagorsk by Comme des Garçons

    Genre: Woody Oriental

    Zagorsk is one of the more distinctive offerings in the Comme des Garcons incense line. Along with the expected spices and frankincense, Zagorsk features an intense pine sap note that smells at once bright, stark, and chilly. When I think about it, Zagorsk is the “coldest” incense fragrance I’ve experienced. Dzongkha and Avignon may share its austerity, but their smoke lends each a warmth entirely lacking in Zagorsk.

    If Zagorsk’s stony, frigid incense appeals to you, then you’re in luck, since this is a staunchly linear fragrance that pumps out its heart accord steadily for hours. Zagorsk projects moderately from the skin, and doesn’t leave huge clouds of sillage behind it, both traits that make it a versatile wear for men or women. After a few wearings and some reflection, I’ve found Zagorsk distinguished offering in a crowded field, and would recommended a sample to anyone seeking a unique twist on the incense theme.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Yuzu Man by Caron

    Genre: Citrus

    Yuzu Man’ssweet citrus and basil opening recalls Annick Goutal’s Eau du Sud, and while the notes are less full and natural, they’re still refreshingly pleasant. Unfortunately, with a few minutes’ wear the basil retreats, and the citrus reveals a shrill and unpleasantly chemical powdered Kool Aid or hard candy aspect that grates on the nose. The intent may be “modern” and “refreshing,” but the effect is irritating, and far more in keeping with liquid hand soap than a fine fragrance. The underpinnings for the citrus are a dry, thin wood accord and a touch of clean musk, neither of which do anything to elevate the wearing experience. It pains me to say it, but Yuzu Man emphatically terminates the remarkable winning streak that had run unbroken through Caron’s masculine releases, all the way from Pour un Homme in 1934 to L’Anarchiste in 2000. I suppose nothing lasts forever…

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Yuzu Ab Irato 09 by Parfumerie Generale

    Genre: Citrus

    Yuzu Ab Irato probably wants to be a dry citrus chypre in the mold of Cristalle or Chanel pour Monsieur, but it doesn’t quite manage to cohere. The tart citrus and aromatic notes up top are arresting, but the citrus doesn’t last, leaving a bald aromatic heart that smells an awful lot like lavender scented hand soap. Things eventually do pick up: the mossy, dry green chypre base exposed during the drydown is impressive in the way it manages to be earthy, clean and pungent all at once.

    Sillage and projection are quite good for this type of light citrus fragrance, but longevity is not. Yuzu Ab Irato has the half life of an eau de Cologne, and is near undetectable after a couple of hours. Had the citrus accord persisted longer, or the mossy base emerged much sooner, I would have enjoyed this fragrance more. As it is, I like the opening and the drydown, but I think Yuzu Ab Irato spends too much time in between smelling like an upscale bath product.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    L'Homme by Yves Saint Laurent

    Genre:Woods

    L’Homme engages the nose with a sweet spiced bergamot accord that’s refreshingly smooth, balanced and natural. The spices move forward and differentiate as L’Homme develops, with bright ginger and a soft nutmeg at the head of the line. The fruity aspect of the opening bergamot remains in place for some time, but the gently rounded vetiver and tonka accord that spreads out beneath it enriches the scent’s midsection beyond mere eau de Cologne.

    The basil in the pyramid takes longer to emerge than I expected, and once it does it remains a well modulated accent on the bergamot rather than a bold, independent statement. This may be for the best, since basil expressed in isolation on my skin can leave me feeling like a well-dressed salad. (As in Maitre Parfumeur et Gantier’s intriguing but unwearable Baime.) The combination emanates a clean “fresh” vibe without employing any of the stereotypical “fresh” aquatic notes that are the current staple in men’s perfumery. L’Homme projects well from the skin without being distractingly potent. It also leaves a nicely judged cloud of light sillage in the air, so its presence remains felt in the wearer’s absence.

    Where L’Homme begins to lose me is in the early drydown, which settles into a fuzzy, overly sweetened, powdery cedar structure that is at once a bit cloying and thoughtlessly overexploited in mass market scents for men. I give Yves Saint Laurent credit for executing this formula with more taste and subtlety than usual, but it’s still a disappointingly commonplace gambit. All the more so given that no less than three highly talented noses worked on L’Homme’s composition. (Or is it that fragrances are like film scripts: multiple author credits mean a desperate patch-up job?) While the Flipo/Ropion/Wargnye team deserves points for their masterful use of basil and ginger – both tough to handle convincingly - I keep wanting more out of the scent’s final hours.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Ysatis by Givenchy

    Genre: Floral Oriental

    Ysatis is a hefty floral oriental fragrance built around a lush, sweetened tuberose note that dominates from the moment the liquid exits the bottle. It’s composed in the same general style as Boucheron, Giorgio, and Poison, though on less monumental scale. This relative (but only relative,) modesty makes Ysatis a lot easier to wear than some of its 1980s congeners, though I’d never call it subtle. Think large SUV vs. Panzer tank.

    Luca Turin and Tanya Sanchez compare Ysatis with Byzance, and while I perceive similarities, Ysatis is a heavier scent, and I think it smells positively stately next to the Rochas. An emphasis on white flowers and abundant soapy aldehydes may also account for the greater sense of occasion I feel when wearing Ysatis. I can see Byzance worn informally or at the office (as my wife frequently does), but Ysatis? Not so much. The aldehydes and the more conspicuous tuberose also leave Ysatis smelling more specifically “feminine” - at least within the Western cultural framework of gender associations and scent.

    The vanilla-seasoned drydown depends less on amber than on soapy floral notes and woods, further emphasizing the relatively starched, formal aspect of the scent while moderating the tuberose’s lascivious tendencies. Ysatis can smell harsh at times, but only moderately so, and it remains a viable alternative for anyone who wants a sweet tuberose scent with oriental base notes and a relatively serious demeanor.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Yohji Homme by Yohji Yamamoto

    Genre: Fougère

    2008:
    Yohji Homme has a fascinating bittersweet opening, alcoholic and aldehyde driven. I can't recall anything like it. It quickly evolves into a woody sweet accord with well-blended coffee and anise accents: a bit like a balsawood dowel soaked in coffee with sambuca.

    The woody notes grow more and more prominent and the coffee floats in and out until, inside of an hour, the whole thing just up and disappears on me. I suspect anosmia here, which is sad indeed, since by all reports what I’m missing is delightful. What I can perceive of Yohji Homme is very promising, but the quick exit leaves me unfulfilled.

    2010:
    My earlier experiences of Yohji Homme left me unsatisfied (see below), largely because I could not detect the scent after about an hour’s wear. I’ve recently had the opportunity to re-sample Yohji Homme from a new source, and am happy to report that this time I can smell the drydown. A good thing, too, because that drydown makes all the difference.

    I’ll echo the estimable pluran in his assertion that Yohji Homme is not quite the “gourmand” scent so many have described it as. While Rochas Man, Lolita Lempicka au Masculin, Body Kouros, and any number of the other scents that riff off of Yohji Homme’s coffee, anise, and rum accord set those notes atop a sweet, vanillic woody oriental foundation, Yohji Homme stands apart in its use of much cooler, drier fougère–style base notes. Yohji Homme’s genius lies in the internal contrast between its sweet, warm, foody notes and the brisk, refreshing aromatics of the fougère construct. Its uniformly sweet gourmand successors all miss the point and wind up smelling ponderous, two-dimensional, and cloying by comparison. Now I get it.


    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Yerbamate by Lorenzo Villoresi

    Genre: Green

    Given the polarized views that Yerbamate seems to generate here, I was hardly sure what to expect of it. As it happens, expectations were irrelevant: Yerbamate would have confounded them no matter what they'd been.

    Yerbamate goes on green and herbal, almost harsh, with just a hint of spicy sweetness in the background to keep the greens from getting out of hand. The herbal notes assimilate quickly, revealing some incense beneath. The tea and mate surface soon after, blending with the incense to create a very beautiful, yet austere accord that marks the heart of Yerbamate. The smoky note observed by some reviewers seems very faint to me - almost a soft shadow of the tea. The tea and mate volley back and forth between woods, incense and a very light powder in a long, slow drydown whose character changes, sometimes abruptly, until it finally fades.

    This fragrance utterly transcends the typical green scent experience. It is complicated, surprising, and more than a little bit mysterious. I'm not sure why some find it so offensive. Maybe it's just baffling, or maybe it responds inconsistently with different skin types. At any rate, I encourage everyone to give it at least a try.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Yendi by Roberto Capucci

    Genre: Green

    I liked Yendi right from the start, but every time I put it on I got this nagging feeling I’d smelled its fruity-green floral accord somewhere before. On the third or fourth wearing it finally hit me: it smells an awful lot like Globe, an extinct masculine that Jean-Claude Elléna did for Rochas in the 1990s. I sampled the two side-by-side to check my sanity, and am happy to report that it’s not just my imagination. In its top notes and much of its heart Yendi is very close to Globe indeed! The two share a brilliantly balanced palette of sweetened green floral notes, bergamot, berries, and soft woods that paints a glowing spring landscape for the nostrils. While Globe sets its green floral accord over a fougère foundation, Yendi rests on a brisk, powdery floral chypre underpinning. The result is a happy green floral fragrance with all of the sophistication of Cristalle or Chanel No. 19, but none of the chilly hauteur.

    Yendi’s sillage and projection are both generous, an its lasting power is more than adequate. There are no seams, lumps, or rough spots anywhere in Yendi’s progression. Instead, it has a natural, inevitable quality about it I’ve found only among the most balanced and well-blended of fragrances. Were it offered today as a niche scent or part of an “exclusive” designer line, I’d wager Yendi would win converts among perfume lovers, but in 1974 it was perhaps not merely prescient, but ahead of its time. Eminently worth seeking out.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Yatagan by Caron

    Genre: Leather (Oriental, according to Edwards)
    Uncompromising. I can think of no better word for Yatagan. It concedes nothing to prettiness. Every element is honed sharp, just like the Turkish blade for which this scent is named.

    The opening is almost pure Artemisia absinthium, commonly called wormwood, and the base of the classic absinthe beverage. Having grown this herb for years, I can assure you that the note is dead accurate!

    At first you might conclude that Yatagan is purely linear, since the artemisia dominates completely for the first couple of hours. But after some time the pine and geranium slowly emerge in a new accord that becomes grounded on a firm leather base. A marvelously integrated touch of castoreum adds animal warmth and vitality to the mix. The whole composition softens slowly through its extended drydown, but never shows even a glimmer of sweetness.

    Yatagan is easy to over-apply, and can be hard to wear. You need to be self assured in the extreme to pull it off. Or do I have it backwards? Perhaps arming yourself with Yatagan channels self-respect and power.

    Yatagan may be far from pretty, but that doesn't mean it isn't beautiful: beautiful in the manner of a desolate landscape under a hot sun, and just as dangerous.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Y by Yves Saint Laurent

    Genre: Chypre

    You know there’s one serious floral chypre coming the minute Y’s crisp, dry, green rose and hyacinth top notes reach your nose. The central floral arrangement fills out with narcissus – also green – and a vetiver-patchouli accord that accentuates the woody aspects of both ingredients.

    Woody-green rose remains the dominant theme in a composition that’s more hard-edged, piercing, and emphatically floral than later genre entries Chamade and Givenchy III. In fact, I think Y is even more coldly aloof than Chanel No. 19. A sustained bugle call of bitter aldehydes accounts for much of this impression, but I pick up plenty of galbanum, too, whether the published pyramid acknowledges it or not. The iris isn’t obvious at all until the drydown, where it contributes to the much softer texture and warmer mood that emerge in the wake of the subsiding aldehydes and green floral notes.

    After two or three hours on the skin the ingredients and structural cues shared between Y, Givenchy III, and Chamade, along with No. 19, Silences, and Yendi, become increasingly obvious. But while the Givenchy, Chanel, and Guerlain all smell timeless today, Y smells of another time – and not necessarily it’s own. Perhaps it’s the unflinchingly serious demeanor, or maybe all those aldehydes, but Y feels more like 1954 than 1964 to me. It’s certainly “perfumey” in that classical manner that’s as likely to repel as appeal, depending on the wearer’s tastes. I prefer the shy smile of Chamade, the earthiness of Givenchy III, or the spring-tinted optimism of Yendi and Silences to Y’s poker faced expression, but I still credit Y for having very possibly paved the way for all of them.

    09 July, 2014

    Showing 271 to 300 of 665.