Latest Fragrance Reviews, Updated Daily

    Showing 331 to 360 of 668.
    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Wall Street by Bond No. 9

    Genre: Aquatic

    The initial resemblance to Creed's Silver Mountain Water is pretty explicit - even shocking. True, Wall Street is a bit less sweet, and the pronounced cucumber top note makes it the more blatantly aquatic of the pair...but the accusations of plagiarism are still hard to ignore.

    The Bond scent doesn't distinguish itself too much from Silver Mountain Water as it ages, either, despite a different list of middle and base notes. Nor is the drydown any improvement on the original. Next to the Creed's ambergris reconstruction Wall Street's synthetic wood drydown smells harsh and bitter. I'm not impressed.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Voyage by Nautica

    Genre: Fougère

    Five minutes into testing Nautica’s Voyage, and I was fully expecting to nod off. Blue liquid? Check. Aquatic top notes? Check. Fresh fougère structure? Check. But before my head had a chance to fall forward and my eyelids droop, something interesting happened. Where most aquatic fougères hum along through a Calone and woody amber midsection, Voyage veers off into an aggressively sweet tropical fruit and floral accord that could have come right out of a contemporary women’s fruity floral. What’s become tiresome in women’s fragrances is a novelty in the realm of men’s scents, and I perked up unexpectedly when it arose. At its heart Voyage smells remarkably like a pineapple-passion fruit juice blend that’s served at my favorite resort on Maui. It’s impossible to take seriously, but it’s undeniably bright, happy, and at the same time strangely luxurious. I can’t shake the beach and palm trees imagery, and so can’t see wearing Voyage on anything other than a hot summer day or an island vacation. (In that respect I guess the name is apt.)

    Voyage’s drydown sadly reverts back to standard “clean,” with blatantly chemical synthetic woods, laundry detergent, and a too-generous helping of Calone for base notes. Had it gone to a warm musk with quality woods, or even a synthetic ambergris, it would have been a better end. Yet even with its disappointing exit, Voyage is far more interesting than most scents in this genre, and if you have to have an aquatic fougère fragrance, this one is at least worth investigating.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Voleur de Roses by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    Genre: Leather
    Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The opening accord of dry, yeasty rose and patchouli is exquisite. Then, after I've worn it for five or ten minutes, the patchouli and rose mutate into…cannabis smoke. That’s right: it doesn't smell like a head shop - it smells like my brother-in-law's bong!

    When the drydown arrives, two or three hours later, it's a lovely arrangement of woods, but what Voleur de Roses does in the middle is beyond my tolerance. I won't appear in public smelling like I've just smoked a whole pound of weed.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Vol de Nuit by Guerlain

    Genre: Woody Oriental

    Vol de Nuit is an odd experience for me, especially in light of other Guerlain classics like Mitsouko, Shalimar, and Apres l’Ondee. I love the sharp galbanum laden opening, and the transition to plush, semi-sweet iris and vanilla is a delightful surprise. The drydown of lingering vanilla with dark spices is a treat as well. What’s so funny, you ask? The whole thing zips by in less than half an hour on my skin. And that’s in pure parfum concentration! Am I anosmic to most of Vol de Nuit’s development, or is this time lapse perfumery? I don’t suppose I’ll ever know.

    Ephemeral as it is, I give Vol de Nuit a thumbs up because, like a rainbow or a butterfly, it’s beautiful while it lasts.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Vitriol d'Oeillet by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    Genre: Floral

    If, like me, the name “Vitriol d’Oeillet” had you dreaming of a transgressive floral successor to the brilliant Tubéreuse Criminelle, dream on. This isn’t all that vitriolic, and it’s not even much of an oeillet. In all fairness, I’m not sure how you’d do a convincing carnation soliflore with the current restrictions on eugenol. (The distinctively medicinal aromachemical common to cloves and carnation reconstructions.)

    What Lutens delivers is not so much an angry carnation as a spicy-woody rose. That’s not a bad thing in itself; in fact it puts Vitriol d’Oeillet in the august company of Caron’s brilliant Parfum Sacré, Amouage Lyric Man/Woman, Czech & Speake’s No. 88, and Frédéric Malle’s Noir Epices. Vitriol d’Oeillet shares with most of these its notes of clove and black pepper, but its profile seems somehow less distinctive than any of them. It has neither the reckless intensity of Noir Epices, the exotic opulence of Parfum Sacré, nor the oudh and incense fueled mystery of the Amouage or Czech & Speake.

    For a perfume house that made its reputation on bold, supersaturated compositions, Vitriol d’Oeillet smells oddly subdued. Indeed, the recent series of conventional – even apologetic – compositions, from Nuit de Cellophane and Bas de Soie to L’Eau Serge Lutens, leaves me wondering what’s become of the outfit that gave us Muscs Koublaï Khän, Ambre Sultan, Tubéreuse Criminelle, and La Myrrhe? This scent is pleasant and competent, but hardly likely to inspire passion, much less controversy. Meanwhile, for a convincing carnation soliflore, vitriolic or not, I’d aim for Comme des Garçons’ Series 2 Red: Carnation.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Visit by Azzaro

    Genre: Woody Oriental

    Very nice nutmeg and citrus top notes are partly obscured by an opening burst of chemical noise, but warm resins, woods, and an animalic musk quickly fill in the olfactory space beneath the persistent nutmeg. The result is a spicy, semi-sweet woody oriental construct resting on an amber foundation. Once it’s settled in, Visit is a smooth, comfortable fragrance whose enveloping warmth belies its blue color. I was not surprised to learn that Visit was composed by Annick Ménardo, as it bears stylistic fingerprints familiar from her earlier masculine orientals such as Jaïpur Homme and Body Kouros. Visit is a plainer, simpler scent than either predecessor, sporting neither Jaïpur’s sweet powdery heliotrope nor the licorice and gourmand elements of Body Kouros.

    Visit doesn’t evolve all that much with wear. Instead, it holds a steady, linear course for several hours before its central structure gives way. The drydown that follows is mostly cedar and musk with lingering sweet amber and perhaps a hint of opoponax. Is Visit terribly original? No. But it it’s an enjoyable, well executed fragrance that’s neither crass nor entirely drab, which is more than can be said of most mass market men’s scents of the past decade. It feels solid, straightforward, and balanced, and I imagine it would be very easy to live with.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Virgilio by Diptyque

    Genre: Green

    Virgilio breeds either adamant supporters or indignant detractors, with few responses in between. I fall in the former camp, and hold Virgilio alongside Eau Lente as one of my favorites from this house. In fact, while available, Virgilio was one of my favorite green fragrances.

    The first thing I notice in Virgilio is a very fresh cut grass note, with just a touch of sharp citrus and some subdued florals. It's a vibrant, verdant opening that evokes a moist early spring breeze. The citrus note grows stronger and sharper as it goes, until it threatens to overwhelm the scent completely. Just before it can, honey, hay, and a minty-sweet basil note move in and blend into a refreshing sweet herbal heart. The heart accord is familiar and evocative to me, but I can't easily pin down the associations. Could it be chervil in a garden? Or perhaps a blend of parsley and tarragon? At any rate, the accord is potent and naturalistic. Once it settles in it continues without much more development, as do so many Diptyque fragrances. When the drydown arrives it presents soft honey and woods that persist for a few hours. This was an icon among green fragrances, and I still lament its demise.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Visa by Robert Piguet

    Genre: Oriental

    Under review here is the 2007 release, composed by Aurélien Guichard. Guichard created Visa between his breakthrough opus Chinatown and his reformulation of Azzaro Couture. Between them these three scents establish a distinct personal style, but they also represent different facets of a single, extremely fertile idea: a hybrid between the lactonic chypre genre, (whose antecedents go as far back as Mitsouko,) and gourmand floral orientals in the modern mold of Angel. The lynchpin note is patchouli, which appears to bind the chypre and oriental components along a common axis in each of the three scents. Besides those patchouli sutures, evidence of common paternity includes boldly three-dimensional lactone-based fruit accords and vanillic base notes so emphatically powdery they cause a pleasant, if peculiar, sensation of ground chalk in the nostrils. Of the three sisters, Visa is the darkest, the spiciest, and the most oriental in its overall flavor. In many respects it may also be the most approachable and easy to wear of the three. It should find an especially receptive audience among those who enjoy the overall structure of Chinatown, but find it too intensely sweet or dissonant to wear with comfort.

    Visa’s top notes are among the most immediately captivating I’ve encountered in a long time. Lush fruit, orange blossom, vanilla, a flourish of aldehydes, a touch of smoky leather, and a subtly pungent animalic element (synthetic civet is my guess) play a grand harp glissando across the olfactory centers. The olfactory colors shift and merge into a soft, luxurious, and utterly seamless accord that simultaneously conjures brushed suede, caramelized spiced fruit, and tropical blossoms, all wrapped in Guichard’s trademark powdery vanilla. Patchouli is ever-present in the foundation, though it does not register strongly as an individual note. Instead it works alongside the quietly persistent animalic musk from the opening to imbue a sense of living warmth to the entire composition.

    Visa is potent without ever seeming crass or loud, and offers substantial sillage and longevity. The beautifully soft powdery/mossy vanillic drydown remains a joy for many hours after application. Fully worthy to stand beside its Bond No. 9 and Azzaro siblings, not to mention the outstanding recent reconstructions of Bandit and Baghari. (The latter again by Guichard.)

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Virgin Island Water by Creed

    Genre: Citrus

    Nice, but…

    Both my wife and I tried Virgin Island Water, and both came to the same conclusion: it’s very pretty, but it smells too much like suntan lotion to spend hundreds of dollars on. Coconut is the villain here. Well-integrated coconut can lend fragrances a certain creamy richness, as in Philosykos, Carnal Flower, or Dawn Spencer Hurwitz’s Bamboo. But when it’s prominent and isolated, as in Virgin Island Water, it quickly gets me thinking “Coppertone.” Maître Parfumeur et Gantier’s Bahiana is another tropical fruit blend that’s spiked with coconut, but I find its coconut in better balance, effectively blended with a rich base of gaiac and rosewood. If you’re looking for a tropical cocktail scent for the summer, I’d recommend Bahiana, Nicolaï’s Juste un Rêve, or even Fresh’s goofy Sugar Lychee over Virgin Island Water.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Violette Précieuse by Caron

    Genre: Floral

    This spicy-woody violet is bitter, chemical, and abrasive right from the start, qualifying immediately for my repulsive top notes hall of fame, right next to Carolina Herrera’s Chic, Montale’s Wood-Spices, and Délices de Cartier. Except for some welcome diminution, things don’t improve much with development: it still smells like burning Styrofoam, not like flowers. While perfume critics Tanya Sanchez and Luca Turin have opined eloquently that women ought not aspire to smell like flowers, I don’t think they should aspire to smell like Violette Précieuse, either.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Violetta by Penhaligon's

    Genre: Floral

    Don’t look for nuance or complexity in Violetta. It’s violets and violet leaves here, and not much else. When a scent is this straightforward in structure, its quality really needs to shine. Violetta’s opening is a touch chemical to my nose, and the unsupported powdery violet accord winds up smelling more like a candle than a perfume. Pretty, but I'd rather have it scenting my sock drawer than my person.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    "Vintage" Tabaróme by Creed

    Genre: Leather

    Vintage Tabarome is one of those much-admired scents that I approach with a certain degree of trepidation. Its reputation looms so large that I fear disappointment. Having now worn it, I can't say that I like it, but I do admire it, and I certainly understand what all the fuss is about. Like some other early twentieth century landmarks, including Bandit, Knize Ten, and Tabac Blond, Tabarôme is utterly uncompromising. Nowhere does it bow to "prettiness." This is Churchills's cigar, smoked in a leather paneled gentlemen’s club. It's "dated," but that's not necessarily a pejorative. It's just that Tabarôme speaks of a particular time, milieu, and social class. I find it hard to wear myself - it makes me feel stuffy and even a bit dowdy, but I must admit the quality is there.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Patchouli by Lorenzo Villoresi

    Genre: Woods

    Lorenzo Villoresi’s Patchouli is a pretty straightforward interpretation of its title note, expressing more of the herb’s minty, astringent aspect than its earthy, quasi-animalic qualities. I don’t find much to analyze here, nor to I perceive much development as the scent wears. The patchouli becomes suggestive of pipe tobacco after an hour or so, but otherwise Villoresi’s Patchouli runs a linear course before it fades away. It’s appeal will depend entirely upon how you feel toward simple, relatively isolated patchouli. My own preference is for more complex treatments of this note, whether in the animalic vein of Parfumerie Générale’s Intrigant Patchouli or Parfums de Nicolaï’s crisp, aromatic Patchouli Homme.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Uomo by Lorenzo Villoresi

    Genre: Chypre

    Lorenzo Villoresi’s scents often open in unpromising cacophony, only to sort themselves out into pleasing accords after some time on the skin. Several that I know, including Teinte de Neige, Yerbamate, and Piper Nigrum, also settle onto a similar set of very powdery, sweet, vanillic base notes. Uomo bears neither of these hallmarks, but it does evince the same predilection for intense spices that Villoresi displays in Spezie, Incensi, and Piper Nigrum.

    Lorenzo Villoresi Uomo is a strongly aromatic, spicy citrus composition that straddles the line between eau de Cologne and chypre in much the same manner as Eau Sauvage and Chanel pour Monsieur, without smelling remotely like either. It begins with a very sharp citrus and pleasantly bitter petitgrain , then charges forward into an assertively “he-man” accord of lavender, conifer, sage, and spices. Uomo’s conifer note partakes of both juniper and juniper berry, and that juniper berry/gin facet serves as a bridge between the scent’s spice and aromatic components. In its scale and general style – even some specific ingredients – it harkens back to spicy aromatic fougères of the 1970s, particularly Azzaro pour Homme, but without the coumarin/tonka element of a fougère, Uomo’s moss, wood, and astringent patchouli base notes have the feel of a chypre.

    Uomo is neither restrained nor subtle, and on my skin it’s as tenacious as it is voluble. In this respect, too it seems like a stylistic throwback to an earlier era in male perfumery. Which I don’t in any way mean as disparagement. On the contrary, if you’re bored by bland, fresh mass market fougères and chemical aquatic fragrances, but still want something relatively bracing, Lorenzo Villoresi Uomo offers a robust, if not necessarily refined, alternative.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Donna by Lorenzo Villoresi

    Genre: Floral

    Lorenzo Villoresi’s scents often open in a state of disarray, with discordant top notes jostling one another in an awkward scramble toward a coherent central structure. Not so Donna, which launches on a simple arrangement of bright lemon and rose, and alters very little as it goes. Some sharp, waxy, aldehydes and mildly bitter green notes season Donna’s heart, but they are very much subordinate to the central rose. The rose in question is clean, crisp, and soapy, rather than fruity, liqueur-like, or indolic/animalic. Perhaps due to its stark presentation, its potency, and its aldehydic accompaniment, it’s unfortunately also a bit cold and chemical in character.

    Villoresi’s Donna is indeed both potent and lasting, and offers generous sillage even with modest application. It stays its linear course hour upon hour, fading more than evolving, with a drydown that’s really just a quieter expression of soapy smelling rose. Rose-lovers, male or female, may find much to like here, but the competition in this particular vein is formidable. For a crisp, literal, and straightforward rose, I’d sooner turn to Serge Lutens’s Sa Majesté la Rose. At a similar price and more readily available, the Lutens feels more nuanced, rounded and alive than Donna.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Vierges & Toreros by Etat Libre d'Orange

    August 2007:
    Vierges & Toreros starts out as a very sharp, smoky leather, sparked with just a touch of bitter citrus. Sweet white flower notes emerge very slowly - even tentatively - from the background. The tuberose does not really present itself as a distinct note. It is blended with what might be jasmine or orange blossoms in a single, seamless accord that drifts mysteriously behind the leather.

    The white floral notes never actually dominate the fragrance, because as soon as they grow conspicuous a very strong blend of dry woods takes firm hold of the base. The floral notes move in and out of focus while the woods, smoke, and leather take on a rustic, campfire sort of character. Very late in the drydown the woods sort themselves out into something very much like cedar, which in combination with the remaining leather reminds me of a cedar chest filled with boots and shoes.

    It's an outstanding leather scent, but not as dramatic or original as I'd hoped for from the maker's description. Vierges & Toreros should appeal to those who enjoy Oud Cuir d'Arabie, Tabac Blond, and Lonestar Memories, but it doesn't displace any of them. Anybody looking for a "masculine" take on tuberose could just suck it in and risk the blatant green tuberose of Ropion's Carnal Flower from Frederic Malle.

    August 2009:
    As much as I love the concept of tuberose and leather, I've grown weary of Vierges & Toreros. Why? It's the drydown. The development ends on a scratchy synthetic cedar base note that's at once unpleasantly harsh and oppressively potent. So while I enjoy wearing Vierges & Toreros for the first hour or two, what follows is tedium, and then exasperation.

    09 July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Vie de Chateau Intense by Nicolaï

    Genre: Chypre

    The analogies are all drawn to Diorella and Eau Sauvage, but for me Vie de Chateau actually falls squarely between green chypres like Givenchy III or Y and the leather chypre of Guerlain’s magnificent Derby. I can see how the exquisitely rendered bergamot and herb top notes and the remarkably deft, light woody chypre foundation might fleetingly evoke vintage Dior, but Vie de Chateau has none of the overripe melon accents common to Diorella and Le Parfum de Thérèse, nor any of the Roudnitska trademark - a peculiar, savory, almost meaty quality – that those two share with his Eau Sauvage.

    No, no such traces of decay cast shadows, however pale, over Vie de Chateau’s glimmering surface. Instead, Nicolaï’s scent is a unambiguously happy, if still complex and understated composition. Its heart is a superbly balanced arrangement of sweet/tart fruit and crisp, stimulating green notes set against a warm, yet never heavy background of tobacco, discreet leather, moss and vetiver. Its green olfactory hue, springtime ambience, and overall texture align Vie de Chateau with the reissued Givenchy III, but Vie de Chateau differs in having less of an astringent edge on its herbaceous notes, in the added warmth of leather, and in the conspicuous use of spices. It’s the leather that can recall Derby and, at a greater distance, Bernard Chant’s Devin. Indeed, if you enjoy any of these great precedents, chances are you will enjoy Vie de Chateau as well. It’s not merely poised, sophisticated, and elegant, but genial and remarkably uplifting to boot. If you ask me, it’s Vie de Chateau, and not the more often praised New York, that represents Patricia de Nicolaï’s most satisfying scent for men.

    09 July, 2014

    Klaaon's avatar

    Singapore Singapore

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Armani Privé Myrrhe Impériale by Giorgio Armani

    As with the rest of the Arabian Night series, Myrrhe Imperial is a well-blended, quality scent. I agree with earlier posts that MI does not evolve as much throughout its 10-12 hours longevity, but it does leave me in a constant comforting cloud of alluring sweet myrrh, amber, saffron and deep woods.

    MI connotes sweetness, but not the saccharine, gourmand sort - rather it is a sophisticated sweetness reminiscent of Arabian luxury.

    09 July, 2014

    baaghji's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Explosions d'Emotions : Onde Sensuelle by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    This one immediately reminded be of Jaipur by Boucheron. Not the same, but the opening with lots of bergamot and jasmine really brought Jaipur into my mind when I smelled it and I haven't had Jaipur on for over 10 years. There is no vanilla in this though, so it settles down to a floral with some little bit of spice and oud in the middle. I haven't given it time to test the dry down, but it seems to be moving to more amber and oud than floral as time passes. Seems like what I imagine is meant by an oriental floral.
    Since I am not big on florals I'm pretty neutral on this, but I think if you liked Jaipur, but maybe thought it was too much of a gourmand then you'll probably like this.

    09 July, 2014

    patsavouta's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    AB Spirit Silver by Lomani

    Lomani probably has some secrets for reminiscenting while lomani's pour homme was a (kinda cheap) reminiscent of Drakkar Noir.. This time for me that's a neat reminiscent of legendary Aventus by Creed (although aventus is a bit sweeter to me) : a nice, powerful and stable masculin scent although sillage and longevity are really poor for my skin.

    08 July, 2014 (Last Edited: 10th July, 2014)

    baaghji's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Vetiver Dance by Tauer

    This one reminded me of summers visiting relatives in India. The talcum powder that the men put on to combat the heat that was oppressive even at the start of the day. Right away there was powdery clean with some floral in the mix, but not overdone and cloying (I rarely like floral).

    In the mid the floral died away and the vetiver began to peak out underneath the powder bringing with it more earth...clean but with honest work outdoors underneath (freshly turned earth and trampled moss).

    The dry down saw the powder almost die away on my skin and a crisp vetiver came to the fore with a hint of spice. This to me was a piece with three themes, each distinct and with its own merits and memories brought forth.

    08 July, 2014

    baaghji's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Le Vetiver Itasca by Lubin

    I can definitely see why so many people like this fragrance, and it definitely seems to be great for evening wear.
    On my skin it started out very boozy for the first two hours, then moved on to an incense heavy and a little closer to the skin but still with good projection. The dry down seemed to almost completely drop the incense note and leave a clean, slightly sweet vetiver, but on me the projection has dropped to almost nothing.
    Heavy and sweet/boozy to start, with incense starting to kick in after some time at the bar or nightclub and then greener at the end of the night when everyone else has been sweating alcohol for an hour or two.

    08 July, 2014

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Bendelirious by Etat Libre d'Orange

    Weird "Pop" aroma guys. The Bendelirious's opening is like a fizzy boozy-sparkling (rhubarb-like) almost disturbing violet-cherry whiff by soon evolving towards a candied and synthetically musky (galaxolide) central stage surrounded by final soapy undertone. Really pungent, candied and fruity. Any trace of leather I frankly "retrace" on my skin while the dry down basically performs as a fruity-musky soap somewhat anonimous and vaguely powdery (in to a linear way). There is a vague earthyness from the vetiver for a while and a touch of soapy musk surrounding the deep cherry type of fruitiness combined with pale woods and a starring balmy vanilla (laundry-toilette type). Frankly I don't know what to think, just I find this aroma almost senseless and no way to be labelled. I would never purchase such a bath-foam like synthetic liquid but I see as could it appeal the "un-civilized" mass. Anyway chemical boredom and nothing else.

    08 July, 2014

    babsbendix's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Boucheron by Boucheron

    This review is for the current EDP.

    I really don't like the opening - strikes me as very harsh and bitter - though I've learned to wear one spray in warmer weather, where it quickly blooms into a soft, deep, billowing, powdery scent that manages to be elegant and approachable at the same time. The green bitterness I initially don't like proves to make the scent balanced and harmonious as it develops.

    For that reason, Boucheron has taken the place in my perfume wardrobe of two older scents that were favorites of mine before reformulation - Must de Cartier and Estee Lauder Private Collection. The counterpoint of bitter green notes, white floral, and vanilla or amber is just so divine and velvety when it's done well, and it's certainly done well here.

    I hadn't grown into Boucheron yet when it launched, so can't compare the versions offhand, only know that I feel quite lucky to have it now as I've lost so many of my great ones, even my old vulgar orange blossom/green/vanilla favorite: the original Dior Addict.

    08 July, 2014

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Moustache by Rochas

    My review is based on the original vintage EDT version of this scent, which opens with a powerful, almost rusty (aldehydes) oak moss balsamic accord, blended with pungent, tasty herbs and spices, light citrus notes, perhaps also leather or dry tobacco. The opening is really dark and dusty, slightly metallic too, carrying a stout nostalgic and austere feel with a bold "urinous" civet note, which blends with an emerging accord of classic chypre masculine flowers (humid, shady notes of rose, carnation, lavender). As the flowers emerge, the scent evolves on a shady dark rose chypre wrapped in the same initial mossy-earthy, herbal-spicy and leathery notes, with musky skanky notes and a bright herbal-citrus breeze, slightly balsamic too. Oriental (some notes slightly remind me of Phileas), but also quite Western it its "restrained" elegance. In fact, overall there is nothing "raw" or "sensual", despite the animalic musky notes, it's rather a really restrained, austere, solid and noble scent, which kind of fits the era it was born – the late '40s. It carries a nondescript "grey", slightly humid feel which I can not describe better, but it feels like touching a, say, vintage 120s wool Prince of Wales piece of cloth, if that makes sense. Not that friendly and not for everyone, but undoubtedly charming it its nostalgic, monolithic gloominess.

    8/10

    08 July, 2014

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Armani Code / Black Code by Giorgio Armani

    Decent opening of citrus, bergamot, spices, aldehydes, on vanillin and soft woods. General – and generic – sharp cleanness, that kind of contemporary cheap "elegance" you smell in gyms, offices, downtown bars... not stinky, but terribly dull.

    5/10

    08 July, 2014

    odysseusm's avatar

    Canada Canada

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Orange Aoud by Montale

    A pretty, floral oud. Starts with delicate orange blossom with hints of leather. Quickly morphs into a light oud scent, framed by floral notes. A simple, light scent.

    08 July, 2014

    RUDOLFO512's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Zegna Uomo by Ermenegildo Zegna

    Zegna Uomo is a great summer scent. It opens very citrusy and dries down to a sweet violet. It smells fresh and clean. Perfect for the Florida heat and humidity, since these two factors make it project even more. I get 6-7 hours when I spray it on my clothes. I love it!!

    08 July, 2014

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Byblos (original) by Byblos

    A "happy, green, fruity floral," as Barbara Herman notes.

    The balance of succulent fruits with creamy flowers is what is most impressive in this scent. The base is a happy combination of vetiver, musk and orris, which grounds it, but still allows it to fly rapturously.

    Quite an original - and wonder of wonders, subtle. There is nothing loud or vulgar in this gem.

    Top notes: Bergamot, Mandarin, Cassis, Peach, Marigold, Raspberry
    Middle notes: Mimosa, Muguet, Rose, Orchid, Heliotrope, Lily, Violet
    Base notes: Orris, Musk, Vetiver

    Beware of the re-issue. Buy only the original in the distinctive squat blue bottle with the rose sculptured top. Proliferates on Ebay, thankfully.

    08 July, 2014

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Ô de Lancôme by Lancôme

    Citrus chypres are rather common in the world of scent, stretching from the 1920s (R&G's LE JADE) through the 1990s (Gres' HOMME DE GRES).

    O DE LANCOME is one of these with a light citrus burst that calms down to an oak moss, vetiver and labdanum chypre.

    They are all perfectly likable and very much like each other. One of the simplest formulas in the perfume world, but done well, the best type of summer scent imaginable.

    This one is as competent as the others. Thumbs up on its own merits, as it would be unfair to take it down a notch because of its lack of originality.

    Turin gives it three stars and names it a "fresh citrus," while Herman praises its "tart, green, herbal dry down."

    08 July, 2014

    Showing 331 to 360 of 668.