Latest Fragrance Reviews, Updated Daily

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    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Manakara by Indult

    Manakara opens with a bold, thick, nearly headache-inducing gourmand accord with a powerful, sweetish aldehydic-boozy heart. I can’t recall what this reminds me exactly, but I am sure I ate a cake once which contained something exactly tasting like this (I mean, smelling...). Shortly though, Manakara smells of creamy, resinous, slightly honey boozy-fruity stuff with an almondy aftertaste and a gentle, silky, powdery breeze smelling of rose petals. Nothing juvenile or “teen”, though: rather an “adult”, carnal, complex, even somehow “naughty” gourmand, all played on warm, deep and sensual notes. Litchi, I don’t get the note, not at all; there’s indeed some fruity bitterness at the very heart of Manakara, but well drowned in a thick dark boozy accord - nothing fresh and zesty as you may expect. Not bad overall, surely not what you would expect reading the composition, but still a really classy and unexpectedly dark, lascivious gourmand scent, with a really peculiar powdery-fruity-boozy core. Kind of linear and therefore, given the almost-sickening boldness, kind of annoying soon... but rather interesting nonetheless.

    6,5-7/10

    07th April, 2015

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Old School Bench by MiN New York

    ... and again, as pretty much anything else I’ve tried so far from this brand, another uninspired variation on the same bunch of trendy aromachemicals. A metallic, plastic, heavily synthetic and terribly cheap blend smelling of, again, some of MiN’s apparent favourite clichés: “dry burning wood”, some vetiver, a nondescript cold gassy-ozonic whiff, made thicker and colder by a rather astringent boozy-aldehydic note. All rather dusty, transparent, somehow slightly rusty too. Cacao and patchouli are there too, and that’s the only interesting part for me, as they’re quite cleverly transfigured in a cold, dusty, mono-dimensional look – that’s interesting because they are deprived of their usual “roundness” and thickness, smelling like holograms of the real thing. A really cold sort of white & black representation of chocolate and patchouli. Another thing I admit I may appreciate is how the blend is built, as the result is extremely tight and densely mixed, and you need quite some time to “unravel” the nuances (an operation unworthy the effort, if you ask me). Dry woody-balsamic drydown with a hint of dusty sweetness, still with a massive plastic feel. Aside from the abovementioned couple of interesting features though, and I’m sure this is my problem, I can’t help finding this overall a barely decent albeit rather boring and uninteresting fragrance loaded with “contemporary niche” clichés plenty of other brands have already and quite more creatively exploited in the last 15 years (burning-woody stuff, booziness, cold airiness, “arty contrasts”...). I get there’s room for everyone, but $ 240 for 75 ml of this?

    4,5-5/10

    07th April, 2015

    landshark321's avatar

    United States United States

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    A*Men Ultra Zest by Thierry Mugler

    A surprising direction for the Thierry Mugler A*Men line, Ultra Zest essentially couples an orange-dominant opening and middle with the usual A*Men base of vanilla, coffee, and most of all, patchouli. I liken this pairing to an orange creamsicle mixed with patchouli and a little (less than usual) coffee, still maintaining the A*Men identity but still being on its own citrus island among its harder-hitting brethren.

    The mixture of citrus and the heavy A*Men base notes render Ultra Zest neither a traditional warm weather fragrance, nor, as with essentially the entire A*Men line, a cold weather fragrances. That the base is so heavy puts it in an awkward limbo. If it were lighter, one could reach for it year-round, but as heavy as it is, I would have limited occasion (perhaps a winter day) to opt for this. And while the scent is almost intriguing in an academic sense, I have little practical desire to wear or smell it all day. The grouping of notes is simply too odd, even for a member of an A*Men line that ended up being so revolutionary for this uniqueness.

    Ultra Zest does at least approximate the usual projection and longevity (10+ hours) of the A*Men line, though it's not quite as strong as the other entries in the line. Still, not one I could reach for, let alone buy.

    6 out of 10

    07th April, 2015

    A forest's avatar



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    Dunhill Icon by Dunhill

    I am all the more hard on this fragrance that i had to really hunt it in Paris to finally smell it.

    Well, a total meh. After having read glorious reviews in GQ or on the web, i finally discover a very shy and almost feminine scent, all Orange blossom and honey-ish that wasn't at all what i expected.

    It reminded me of L'artisan Seville à l'aube (though they may not be that close) probably due to that orange blossom presence. I didn't like this one and neither do i like Icon.

    Well at least it's not very expensive and the bottle is nice (though less in real than in picture) but nothing i really cared for.

    07th April, 2015

    Kaern's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Dior Homme Eau for Men by Christian Dior

    Apart from a hint of the original, this is your basic fresh summery citrus offering from Dior. The iris is muted imo.

    It's perfectly wearable and lasts a very long time, but it disappointly crashes into the unoriginal and predictable woody finish.

    It's a bit flat really, which isn't ideal for a summer scent and a little lazy.

    I will wear occasionally though

    07th April, 2015

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

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    Private Collection - Cuir d'Iris by Parfumerie Generale

    I love leathers and I love iris. The name of this scent seemed to be a perfect come hither promise of fulfillment in these two areas. The best iris around is of course Lutens' Iris Silver Mist with its abundance of orris butter, which creates the impression of a soft Italian leather in glove, jacket or purse.

    Cuir d'Iris has a smoky harshness to it (the Oud, Patchouli, and Cedarwood), which reminds one of coal tar. It is not warm, sweet and enveloping as a great leather needs to be. It balances a line between a rough, uncured leather and uncured tobacco leaves. The use of the iris is very restrained but constantly present. A warm leather requires some violet in its make-up, but that is not present here.

    Some of the early "cuir de russie" scents from the late 1890s and the early 1900s had this harsh, smoky, uncured effect, which made sense in those days of unhygienic body odors permeating society on all levels. This doesn't work for me, but it's a perfectly fine scent for those who want their leather this strong.

    07th April, 2015

    rbaker's avatar



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    Tubereuse 3 L’Animale by Histoires de Parfums

    Now there is tuberose ever present in this scent, convincing and quite natural, but it are the variations of accompaniments that makes this a particularly interesting creation. At first fruity-fresh with bergamot and a lychee-kumquat background. Green and herbal components are emerging in the drydown, with impressions of jasmine and autumn fields being conjured up. The base - no surprise here - adds woodsy notes, but an added tobacco sidekick gives the later phases a nice twist.

    This then is a tuberose that keeps my interest awake throughout. Sillage is moderate, the projection good, and I get six hours of longevity. A Histoire worthy of being more than history only.

    07th April, 2015

    Bal a Versailles's avatar



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    Histoire d'Eau by Mauboussin

    Ms Rochambeau finds a hybrid of Mauboussin original and Cuir Amethyste. Perhaps that is what led to Histoire D'Eau Amethyste. It doesn't matter now as Topaze is discontinued and Cuir Amethyste has priced itself off the planet. ( I have two back up bottles of CA)
    Histoire D'Eau Amethyste languishes at the discounters and Christine Nagel, who was Michel Almairac's protege (he of Cuir Amethyste) is now at Hermes. So Histoire is very much in play here, a story of water indeed. I love them all, except HDE Amethyste, which I don't know at all. It's all very Scicilian isn't it? Speak Softly love

    07th April, 2015

    hedonist222's avatar



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    Cologne Indélébile by Editions de Parfums Frederic Malle


    A big juicy orange flower note.

    Very fresh (not very citric really) smelling.

    It's not bad, but where's the Editions de Parfums flare?

    07th April, 2015

    subhuman85's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    L'Homme Libre by Yves Saint Laurent

    Rather more enjoyable than I expected, L'Homme Libre is a flanker to the original L'Homme, a generic sweet-woody masculine in a sea full of them (and a bestseller, natch). I expected Libre to be something similar, but was struck by its relative dryness when compared to the original and its first flanker, La Nuit de L'Homme...and, indeed, most of the recent offerings on the men's fragrance counter. Libre also has a crisp violet leaf note that calls to mind Dior Fahrenheit, a classic masculine fragrance that I did not expect to see referenced in a modern-day scent aimed at a much younger crowd than the Dior classic. The grey, steely, oh-so-urban vibe given off by the violet leaf, pepper, and citrus notes, combined with a smoothed-over patchouli/leather drydown, indeed almost makes Libre a more convincing modern-day Fahrenheit update than Dior's recent Fahrenheit Absolute and Fahrenheit Parfum. Yes, I'm surprised, too. I have no great affection for any of YSL's recent offerings, least of all the snooze-worthy L'Homme, but try as I might I just can't find anything truly wrong with Libre, and there's quite a bit here that I like. Good sillage and lasting power, "business casual" in tone, and blissfully bereft of sugar, screeching woods, or syrupy musk. I'll take it.

    07th April, 2015

    missylee's avatar

    Australia Australia

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    Dior Addict by Christian Dior

    Reminds me of Kenzo Amour - less gourmand, more floral

    07th April, 2015

    Calvin's avatar



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    A*Men Pure Malt by Thierry Mugler

    First off, this does not smell of malt wiskey. Rather, to pin down the boozy note, consider a nice rum spiked eggnog. It is perhaps the most delicious of the gourmand-oriented scents. While I have to give it a thumbs up, at the end of the day it likely should not rank higher than it progenitor, A-Men. It lacks the tarry sharp notes of A-Men as a counterpoint to the gourmand richness. Pure Malt certainly is not one dimensional without it, but nor is it as iconoclastically multidimensional as A-Men. Some don't like that tarry note, but something is necessary to cut the fat of these high-calorie offerings.

    07th April, 2015

    NickZee's avatar

    Australia Australia

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    Brut by Fabergé

    The current special reserve EDC formulation is an anise bomb. Think of amped up ouzo supported by florals notes and tonka. For the first 15 minutes the volume is turned to 11, but then there is a sudden decline in projection. The anise tones down enough to allow the lavender and supporting florals and tonka to create a nice scent which can be detected by the wearer for a couple of hours. But the strong opening blast of anise is never overcome, and led me to tire of the fragrance quickly despite other notes lending a helping hand.

    The sprayer on my bottle is the worst I have encountered. It looks low quality, the pump action is poor and substance ineffective. I guess Brut started out as a splash and we should be thankful for any spray were given.

    Overall I suggest people stay away from this one. Plenty of invigorating lavender fragrnces out there that won't burn your nostrils. The anise is just too much. Unfortunately this is one frag that should have been discontinued long ago.

    07th April, 2015

    Perfumed Librarian's avatar

    United States United States

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    La Panthère by Cartier

    I was so disappointed in this after being given a sample by a sales associate who seemed to be genuinely excited about it. It was consistently sharp and synthetic and never deviated from that. In a way it reminded me of White Diamonds, although not as cloying/enveloping. Couldn't wait to wash it off.

    07th April, 2015

    RCavs's avatar

    Brazil Brazil

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    Kouros Eau de Sport by Yves Saint Laurent

    Best Kouros flanker ever! As said before, It's a tamed version, smoother, domesticated and for that reason, easier to love. It's in no way a sport fragrance. All Kouros DNA is right there, just more polite, in smaller quantities, I dare to say, better blended. It's a pittty It was discontinued. 5 out of 5 stars!

    07th April, 2015

    flathorn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Kelly Calèche by Hermès

    It's hard to find really great, inoffensive, go-everywhere fragrances. The ones that become your go-to scent. Kelly Caleche has the potential, yet it ended up being too 'meh' for me. I just don't care enough to put much effort into it. It actually came across on me first as a lightly floral green tea fragrance, which was kind of nice, but it needed to go somewhere from there. As it aged I was really looking for the soft leather, but it never kicked in with any distinction. If it had it would have added that extra level of interest I was looking for. I've tried it several times over the years, so I feel comfortable in concluding it doesn't blossom to its full capacity on my skin, and when you're talking fragrances like this, they really need to be all they can be on your skin.

    06th April, 2015 (Last Edited: 19th April, 2015)

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Genghis Khan by Marc de la Morandiere

    A first blast on skin and a marvellous spicy flashback of my youth jumps arrogantly on mind. Look around at the listed notes guys and compare at once those to all the ones listed around by Basenotes and Fragrantica under the great Romeo Gigli by Romeo Gigli; many many elements expressly in common (bergamot, citrus, cloves, aromatic herbs, rosemary, amber, patchouli, sandalwood, resins etc). I detect furthermore a common note of tobacco and a touch of animalic (civet??), both the elements not listed for Marc de la Morandiere Gengis Khan while present in Gigli. I detect more in general also a common foundation of resinous (ambery-incensey) oakmoss, ginger, sweet spices, undiscernible fruity patterns and amber-vanilla. Either the scents are tremendously spicy, resinous, exotic, animalic and musky. Basically the two fragrances are really close each other, being Gigli far more floral, sparkling, revolutionary (despite seems having been issued one year later) and complex while Genghis Khan seeming more mossy-resinous, woodsy and typically coniferous. Anyway both the juices are woodsy/resinous spicy-oriental with plenty of nuances (based on a common foundation of resinous oakmoss, oriental patterns and richly spicy tobacco/tonka) despite Romeo Gigli stands out incomparably. Anyway Genghis Khan (Gengis Khan) performs a powerfully earthy undetone (prickling under my nose) which I appreciate a lot along the way. Another juice jumping far more timidly on mind is Boss Elements (because of the fruity-floral spiciness rooted over a woodsy foundation) but Elements is more properly woodsy aromatic and floral while Gengis Khan and Gigli deflect towards a resinous spicy-exotic "orientalism" more daring and visceral. A further floral-spicy-oriental jumping endly on mind (with its ambery/mossy/coconutty/suede-tobacco veined resinous dry down) is also the great Moschino Pour Homme, more properly powerhouse in structure, leathery and benzoinic. An extremely sensual fragrance with a classic articulated structure (with many "powerhouse" nuances of course) and an exotic hyper spicy modernism.

    06th April, 2015 (Last Edited: 07th April, 2015)

    clamnole's avatar

    United States United States

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    Polo Black by Ralph Lauren

    Sickeningly sweet mango and spice dominant fragrance with poor longevity. I generally like Ralph Lauren and find most of their fragrances well balanced. Black however, is less than the Polo standard. The mango wears me out way before the fragrance can die, which was about two hours tops.

    I can't imagine wearing this anywhere ever.

    06th April, 2015 (Last Edited: 07th April, 2015)

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Rose Oud by Nicolaï

    When I've read "Rose Oud" I was on the point to dismiss the sample ...."so boring"...I've thought, on the contrary guys this Nicolai's fragrance is really worthy. A really particular take on the rose-oud theme in which the main "argument" appears surprisingly bright, sparkling, organic and leafy-earthy-botanic with its satisfactory fresh accord of osmanthus, red fruits, aldehydes, fruity-exotic davana oil and lily of the valley. I detect a freshly green fruity-floral intensity (somewhat fluidy, citric and berrish) in the middle of a light amber-musk accord. Where is the oudh? Well, it is really magistrally calibrated, brightly aldehydic, powdery, elegant and slightly fruity, a perfect rendition for a carefree dynamic young lady full of dreams to pursue and goals to catch. I detect in the air a shadowy (saffron??), suede veined, neutral and "molecular" (powdery ambery and animalic) rose-oud accord which conjures me more than vaguely the simil accord yet enjoyed in Histoires de Parfums Rosam (but in a lighter and less resinous way). A pity for the faint longevity.

    06th April, 2015

    flathorn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Bal d'Afrique by Byredo

    Too variable for me to be willing to spend time or money on. Sometimes it hints at a lusciousness and sensuality that is attractive; other times it has borderline offnotes and doesn't hang together. But there is always a dark berry note I don't find especially pleasing as it always stands out and doesn't quite meld. I think I'm reacting to that berry note, which is one I'm fairly allergic to. It pretty much destroys any fragrance it's in for me. It's not listed, but then, how many notes are?

    06th April, 2015

    clamnole's avatar

    United States United States

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    Boston Ivy by D.S. & Durga

    From a sample.
    Really interesting fragrance. Wasn't sure that I liked it right away because the combination of the notes are unique to me and they seemed to work by themselves. Notes include a floral spice, dirty green vegetation and ocean salt. The floral is kind of clove like, and the dirty green vegetation and ocean salt seemed to drift back and forth. Almost like being on a green forested shore, with a peppery floral fragrant on the air, as a wave washes in the scent of ocean salt becomes dominant. As the wave washes back out, the green and floral spice take back over. Definately an earthy green vibe with this one. Sillage was average, but the scent stayed with me beyond 8 hours, which I absolutely loved. Not sure where I'd wear this, but it's captivating none the less.

    Truly unique fragrance that I want to try again and probably again. Thumbs Up.

    06th April, 2015

    daisyvision's avatar



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    Truth or Dare by Madonna

    I'm a little wary of celebrity scents in general, however, I decided to try Madonna's fragrances for a couple reasons. Though I haven't felt inclined to listen to her music or keep up with her in over a decade, I have a huge soft spot for this living style & music legend who influenced my adolescence so much. When I saw that she had a couple of her own fragrances, I instantly thought of her appreciation for vintage and classic movie stars/style, and I crossed my fingers hoping for that old school, classy Madonna to shine through.

    Boy, did she ever! Where do I even begin? I guess with a warning: You must love white florals to appreciate this gem. If you're the type who is sensitive to white florals, let the blindingly white bottle stand as a blatant indication of what's inside, and run far, far away!

    However, if you can appreciate intense white floral notes, you simply MUST try this one. The tuberose is relentless and booming, it wafts around you for hours. It may take several minutes for the more subtle notes to start shining through and lending a little bit of spice and creaminess. Madonna certainly succeeded in creating something "classical and timeless yet modern". Truly gorgeous and dangerously intoxicating. There's just one thing: I wouldn't suggest this for casual wear - I'll personally be reserving this for the times I need to feel a little more elegant or confident, say for classy dinner parties or higher-end restaurants.

    Lastly, this is one of the most powerful fragrances I've ever tried in terms of sillage and longevity. I didn't expect much for the price, but I was unbelievably stoked after my first spray.

    Breathless Mahoney, ahoy!

    06th April, 2015

    clamnole's avatar

    United States United States

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    Dior Homme Sport (2012) by Christian Dior

    Nothing terrible, but nothing special. Very different from the rest of the Dior Homme line, in that there is no floral, no iris, no powder dominating the fragrance. DHS is just a typical citrus on the top of woods and vetiver. There so many better versions of this everywhere. I would choose Dior's own Eau Sauvage over DHS, 100 out of 100 times.

    Dior is a great house, no doubt, but I just don't get the hype around the Homme line, and this one is average at it's very best.

    06th April, 2015

    clamnole's avatar

    United States United States

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    Uomo by Valentino

    I just don't care for this scent and I can't put my finger on why.

    First, the overall scent is way too strong for my liking. It's an odd floral note, perhaps mixed with some kind of inscense or something. Soft and powerful. Easily could be a unisex fragrance as the middle notes are elderly-feminine IMO. Comes in a feminine-elderly like bottle as well.

    06th April, 2015

    odysseusm's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    L'Eau du Caporal by L'Artisan Parfumeur

    I can compare the recent re-issue with the vintage version.

    NEW - Starts with good citrus note, quickly moves to herbal (like tarragon, marjoram) and minty notes. The mint is well done, not like toothpast or peppermint candy. Rather, it is green, leafy, with a hint of lemon zest and rather herbal in style. Cool, even a bit camphor-like, the latter could be from the lavender. Very refreshing. Hints of grassy vetiver and salty oakmoss appear. Dry (not sweet), substantial but not heavy, wears well. Has an intriguing, even haunting quality. The dry-down has a salty mossy note and retains the herbal mint. Overall, a very successful reformulation.

    VINTAGE - A bit greener at the beginning, and the lavender is stronger. The scent is more powerful at this point: a bit sweeter, denser, richer. Not as herbal-minty at first -- rounder and more full. The dry-down lands in a very similar place to the new version.

    So, I find that I appreciate both but actually prefer the new version. I like its dry, haunting, herbal quality.

    06th April, 2015

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Barrel by MiN New York

    Maybe it would have been better for me not to know that Julien Rasquinet composed MiN line, because nearly every scent I try from this brand smells to me like a rushed sketch of other fragrances Rasquinet composed for other brands. Like if MiN decided to produce a series of trials and incomplete versions the nose then developed for other clients. Barrel seems to me something halfway Bois d’ascèse and several boozy-fruity scents, basically the Bois just with a sweet fruity-floral note and a suede-amber base which provides a bit of warmth and “silkiness”. But basically that’s that, another variation on that futuristic, super-dry, kind of dark “incense-ash-woody” synthetic accord. Say, Naomi Goodsir’s Bois d’ascèse meets Naomi Goodsir’s Cuir Velours. With a bit of two Masque scents, Tango and Russian Tea (I know Rasquinet didn't compose all of these, eh!). Nothing more than just nice for me, with a quite cheap drydown (dry, synthetic, quite light and endlessly linear) which is fine, but utterly redundant if you already own some of the abovementioned scents. And *outrageously* priced for the quality and the creativity (both tending to the lower end here, in my opinion).

    6-6,5/10

    06th April, 2015

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Forbidden by House of Matriarch

    Forbidden opens with a powerful blast of dark, thick floral-indolic notes (a truly overwhelming, ipnotic, migraine-inducing tuberose) with a subtle zesty feel and bitter, crunchy leafy nuances, as per Matriarch’s style. The notes are raw, bold, dark; the ambery powderiness, the “botanical” indolicness, the threatening astringent greenish accord, a really peculiar kind of decadent fruity-vegetable breeze (that mushroom note?) set a mood which makes me think of Lovecraft’s stories, that American Gothic heritage which seems behind other House of Matriarch scents – that, with a hippie approach. The mood is dark, breezy, quiet but gloomy and tense. A nice, clever and interesting take on a rather classic floral note, which smells opulent but definitely in a non-classic meaning; no French luxury “baroque” here, rather a cold, shady, earthy blend which smells at the same time much realistic and vibrant, but filtered through an oniric, kind of mesmerizing approach with a definite “narcotic” power – a subtle dark sweetness mixed with that “flower power” (hence my “hippie” reference). Shortly a hypothetical “hippie gothic”, if that ever existed. As for other House of Matriarch scents though, the persistence is a bit weak: the first minutes are incredibly sharp, bold and catchy, but it quickly tames down to a still nice, yet more “average”, quiet and uninteresting tone – not what I would expect for such a price. A nice vetiver note pops out on the drydown, still carrying a subtle dusty sweet feel. Nice, but really incomparable to the superb early phase. There’s some magic indeed in this fragrance, but you’ve to be quick enjoying it until it’s there... still a really good dark and lascivious floral-woody scent, quite an interesting stop for all tuberose’s fans, but unworthy the cost in my opinion.

    7-7,5/10

    06th April, 2015

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Bohemian Black by House of Matriarch

    Bohemian Black opens with a really peculiar blend reminding me of classic masculine warm citrus-floral-woody scents like Eau Sauvage or Caron’s Third Man, mixed with a thick, “round” and kind of nostalgic floral-aldehydic bouquet as in vintage chypres – say, Guerlain’s Chamade. This, with a sprinkle of modern creativity: a sort of sparkling boozy note (a boozy citrus, specifically), a sweet-resinous dark and warm choco note. That boozy note is supposed to evoke “limoncello” liquor, and – trust an Italian on this – it perfectly nails it: the smell in Bohemian Black is exactly that. A sweet, citric, thick and syrupy boozy aroma. I admire Christi Meshell’s work on this scent, which seems like a Rubik’s cube to recompose together: several different nuances, a sort of schizophrenic dark hybrid between an indolic-floral chypre, a pine-citrus barbershop fougère, a resinous gourmand, a fresh boozy scent. Joyful and summery on one side, somber and autumnal on the other. And a dozen of different tones singing together, from dusty warm resins to the citric booziness, through a classic jasmine-based floral accord and that “uncle’s aftershave” feel. Mad, if you ask me; but incredibly solid and really well put together, a really fun and clever “detournement” of several classic canons with a contemporary approach. A geometric kaleidoscope smelling refined and intriguing, extremely harmonic and pleasant despite the coexistence of so many different notes and inspirations. The main flaw? Just take a stopwatch with you when you spray this, ‘cause in a matter of some dozens of minutes it will be all gone. As much bizarre, colorful, interesting and bold at first, as then settling on a floral-woody, amber-patchouli drydown smelling quite plain, linear, almost openly cheap. Like many (too many!) niche scents, it “says it all” within the first hour, then a boring, weak drydown. Contrary to the inspiration which it seems to quote, since vintage chypres and fougères are often brilliant essays of how to master the drydown of a fragrance. Still nice overall, but too costly for being that cool for just one hour or so.

    7/10

    06th April, 2015

    Paul H's avatar

    South Korea South Korea

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    4711 Echt Kölnisch Wasser by 4711

    Good for after a shower and sleeping scent.

    06th April, 2015

    döfä91's avatar

    Finland Finland

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    Bleu de Chanel Eau de Parfum by Chanel

    This is much more thicker, deeper, smoother and softer variation of Bleu de Chanel than EDT, the most describing adjective is imo more SENSUAL - more quiet and lacks the sharp edges of the EDT . It's a very nice variation and can be worn at the same time with the EDT. I get more woodiness and amber than EDT and maybe some tonka (?) as well. The longevity is slightly better than in the EDT but projection and sillage are like typical for an EDP, toned down, this works closer to skin.
    The relation and idea between Bleu EDT and EDP is comparable with Allure Homme Sport EDT and AHS Eau Extreme.

    I like the idea of owning both EDT and EDP of this one, because they both smell really gorgeus but work in a different way - one can choose to wear whichever suits more to the specific time, place, situation and the mood of the wearer, or even wear they both at the same time - both receive full 5 stars for me and I count them to the masterpieces of Jaques Polge, the perfumer.

    The 150 ml bottle can be bought for about 100 euros, likewise Allure Homme Sport Eau Extreme. Any other bottle size is overpriced if you calculate the price/ML ratio, this applies to fragrances in general of course, but especially in Chanel ones.

    06th April, 2015

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