Latest Fragrance Reviews, Updated Daily

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    Way Off Scenter's avatar

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    Rubj Parfum Extrait by Vero Profumo

    Genre: Floral

    I’ll hand it to Vero Kern: she keeps you on your toes with complex, novel, and adventurous compositions. She has a knack for taking familiar notes – lavender, neroli, birch tar – and making them the pillars of peculiarly disorienting accords. There’s also much, much more going on in her perfumes than those three-note pyramids at Lucky Scent let on! I have a hard time knowing what to make of Rubj’s opening gestures. Pepper? Fruit syrup? Moroccan preserved lemons? White flowers? It’s all too much, too incongruous, and moving much too rapidly for me to sort out without an olfactory freeze-frame option.

    Indolic orange blossom and jasmine eventually emerge as the recognizable focus of Rubj’s structure, supported by a very potent vegetal/animalic (ambrette seed?) musk and rendered profoundly strange and compelling by a persistent illusion of those uniquely salty-sour Moroccan lemons. What started as an intensely sweet scent becomes at once bittersweet and tantalizingly tart with age. (Not unlike some people I know.)

    Like both of the other Vero Kern scents, Rubj is potent (parfum strength), with bold projection and ample sillage. It also lasts and lasts…and lasts. When it finally begins to dry down, Rubj settles into an amber and musk skin scent that radiates resinous-animalic warmth for several hours longer. A fascinating scent with a unique profile, and well worth sampling, even if you don't intend to purchase.

    01st July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

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    Royal Water by Creed

    Genre: Citrus

    For some reason the name has me thinking of Windsor family urine samples, but that’s not quite fair to this perfectly pleasant, if undistinguished, herbaceous eau de Cologne-style fragrance. The lemony opening steers just clear of furniture polish, thanks to hints of basil and rosemary, then drives off into the sunset, leaving in its wake an attenuated version of the typical Creed “millésime” drydown. This sort of thing is done far better – and at much less expense – in scents like Monsieur Balmain or Annick Goutal’s Eau du Sud, so I wouldn’t waste my money on this.

    01st July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

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    Royal English Leather by Creed

    Genre: Leather

    A rich and somewhat sweet leather of great depth and presence, yet also very civilized. My wife describes it as “clean riding tack,” and I won’t disagree. Royal English Leather doesn’t seem to develop too much on me, but why should I complain, since the accords it holds are so appealing? Deservedly a classic among leather scents, right beside Eau d’Hermes and Chanel's Cuir de Russie.

    01st July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

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    Royal Bain de Caron / Royal Bain de Champagne by Caron

    Genre: Oriental

    Royal Bain de Caron is a bright, citrus-laden oriental scent built over a sweet and intensely powdery vanilla and amber base. The creamy texture of its citrus accord reminds me for some reason of Shalimar, and I suppose that if you peeled away the civet, the smoke, and the spices from Shalimar, you’d wind up with something like Royal Bain de Caron. All of which is a roundabout way of saying that Royal Bain de Caron is a stripped down version of the classical oriental fragrance structure.

    In its apparent simplicity and the “tutti frutti” nature of its citrus accord, Royal Bain de Caron seems surprisingly modern for a 1920s composition. I recall reading somewhere that Royal Bain de Caron was reformulated in the 1990s, and I have to say it smells like it. I can’t deny that it’s buoyant and cheerful, rare qualities among oriental fragrances, but Royal Bain de Caron also smells thin and bare to me, like an orchestral theme played on an electric keyboard. Whether you enjoy this scent depends on what you want out of an oriental fragrance. If it’s sweet powder and good cheer you’re after, Royal Bain de Caron has plenty, but for the exotic spices, sultry atmosphere, and mysterious depths an oriental fragrance can conjure, you’ll have to look elsewhere.

    01st July, 2014

    Way Off Scenter's avatar

    United States United States

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    Royal Aoud by Montale

    Genre: Woods

    Of the Montales I've tried so far (Aoud Ambre, Attar, Royal Aoud, Black Aoud, Aoud Lime, and Steam Aoud) Royal Aoud is the only one that goes on positively understated. In fact, it makes the others seem downright histrionic in their entrances. It also strikes me as both the most complex and the least direct of the lot.

    This scent has a powdery-sweet foundation that tempers the medicinal and astringent aspects of the oudh. The listed fruit and citrus notes are very coy at first, but surface more completely during the development, where they serve to round out the heady note of rose. Eventually, a vanilla/tonka bean note slides in to add a bit of extra sweetness.

    The oudh and the rose retreat during the drydown, leaving a pleasant, but not all that distinguished powdery-woody accord. On my skin, Royal Aoud does not have the stupendous (24 hr) tenacity of Black Aoud, but its development is not so glacially slow, either. (Black Aoud's drydown is so slow and extended that I didn't even realize it was happening the first few times I wore the stuff.)

    Among the Montale's I see Royal Aoud, Black Aoud, and Attar as quite closely related, though differing in general character. Black Aoud, which is my current favorite, is bold, brash, maybe even brutal, in its directness and simplicity. (Imagine that! A "brutal" rose. Now there's a good name for a scent.)

    Attar seems the sweetest of the three, with some mysterious accords and a drydown that goes in its own direction. I find Royal Aoud the easiest to wear of the three, as well as the "prettiest". Funny though: it's relative sophistication blunts it in comparison with its siblings, leaving it the most conventional of the three, and because of that, less distinguished. I prefer the olfactory challenge of Black Aoud.

    01st July, 2014

    Anosmia Amnesia's avatar



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    Égoïste / L'Égoïste by Chanel

    I had a weird experience: I tried Guerlain Mouchoir de Monsieur in the morning. I wasn't crazy about it. Then in the afternoon, I tried Egoiste, which I like so much that I have a current bottle and a vintage bottle from eBay. I kept getting Rose-vanilla wafts of MdM all afternoon. I finally figured out that it was the Egoiste. Guerlainade and Egoiste are pretty similar! Apart from that chance combination, I don't think I ever would have made the connection.

    Coming back to trusty Basenotes, I see that JackTwist says the same thing, and he cites Luca Turin as also agreeing. So if you're curious about discontinued Guerlains, you can find out something about them by trying Egoiste.

    I personally like Egoiste much better. I think it's less dandified and more modern, while still being restrained and elegant.

    01st July, 2014

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Night Eau De Parfum by Victoria's Secret

    Synthetically fruity (plums more than apple), darkly velvety, "plastically organic", cromatically blue/violet, "ideally" woody, hurban techno-chic (New York more than Paris). Conceptually close to a "whichever" Cavalli Nero Assoluto (which is worst, more floral, gummy and unbalanced) whereof Night Eau de Parfum appears a fruitier and woodier version. Hints of orchid or violet in the industrial mix? A touch of final dark vanilla compacts the citric-salty/sweet molecules of this cosmetical fatigue. Anyway another designer "night out-for" artificial potion just to be noticed and not to be respectfully admired in quality and mystery. 5/5

    01st July, 2014

    RUDOLFO512's avatar

    United States United States

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    Gentlemen Only by Givenchy

    Gentlemen Only by Givenchy is a very nice fragrance. The combination of incense and vetiver is spectacular. Then the dry down is soft/spicy. It smells fresh, clean and masculine. It is perfect for the office or a dinner date. Elegant verses playful.

    01st July, 2014

    bartdino's avatar

    Switzerland Switzerland

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    Cedre Blanc by Creed

    Very nice and interesting cologne with a good staying power. Start a little spice fresh then you have floral smooth heart and stay with a fresh woody base with cedar, vetyver and maybe sandalwood. A little fresh powdery. Remind me my creed favourite Pure White Cologne with a woody base. Very beautiful composition, an allround cologne for me. Nice work Creed !

    01st July, 2014

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

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    Jil Sander No. 4 by Jil Sander

    This contains everything but the kitchen sink - there are even some notes that are not listed above - Mace, Pimento, Orris, Neroli and Carnation among them.

    To my nose this is an extremely heavy, extremely floral, very old fashioned melange that truly bring to mind the negative connotation of "old lady" perfume.

    There is nothing subtle about this one - it hangs in the air cloyingly. It can kill at forty paces on a warm day.

    Barbara Herman calls it a fruity floral. It is that, but overwhelmingly so.

    Even I could have come up with something like this if I'd just thrown together all the heavy florals in the laboratory. Not even cleverly or uniquely combined. Just a recreation of a very old and thankfully out of date formula.

    Unpleasant.

    01st July, 2014

    deadidol's avatar



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    Peety by O'Driù

    Slightly deceptive, Peety starts out on what appears to be a new path for O’Driu but then switches direction, heading instead toward more familiar aromatic territory.

    The initial application reminded me a little of L’Ombre Fauve’s patchouli muskiness placed over a series of balmy notes. Initially absent was the standard aromatic blast of herbs that dominate many of the scents from this line, replaced instead with a warm and inviting coumarin kind of feel—not quite vanilla, but sweeter than tonka or benzoin. And then as if from out of nowhere, hot spicy notes and herbal flourishes come striding in positioning Peety as back in familiar territory.

    While the herbs and spices start to take over, it retains some of its warmth, creating a bit of a juxtaposition. I picked up on some candied citrus upfront that reminded me a little of Bohemian Black’s herbal limoncello opening in which culinary spices and candied lemons converge. The spices are sharper and more “pink” here than in the Matriarch—more of a combination of clove, cinnamon, and pepper with a slightly sweaty cardamom lurking around as well. Subtle minty facets pop up, but I think this is perhaps residue from one of the floral notes. Once the scent has reoriented itself on this more traditional O’Driu aromatic path, it stays fairly linear and consistent throughout, wearing as quite cooling given the hot nature of some of the spices.

    I’ve smelled a lot of O’Driu perfumes, and this is really the first to embrace such amber-y characteristics, and it seems to work in the scents favor. While I’m personally a bit unsure about how successfully balmy notes function when placed against sharp, almost medicinal herbs, the scent stands out from the rest of the line. It’s still O’Driu—meaning that it’s kind of weird—but this one of the more accessible scents that I’ve smelled from the brand. Of course it’s no secret by now that you’re supposed to top this scent off, but I’ve opted to pass on this part of the process so that I can focus more intently on what’s already present. I think it’s a good scent overall—one of the better from the line, but a still a few notches away from something like Lalfeogrigio.

    01st July, 2014

    cocteautwinn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Gucci Flora : Glamorous Magnolia by Gucci

    I want to love this EDT, but after the dry down, there's barely a discernable note other than a vaguely green citrus base. I'm not impressed with this flanker. I may exchange it at Ulta.

    01st July, 2014

    deadidol's avatar



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    Or du Serail by Naomi Goodsir

    As a point of reference, I really enjoyed Bois d’Ascese but wasn’t very taken with Cuir Velours. A friend who’s quite into sweet and fruity scents had been raving about this one, so I was looking forward to taking it for a spin even though I knew it might not be to my taste. This is essentially a honeyed fruit and tobacco scent with a bit of musky cocoa peeking through. It takes some of the bigger commercial successes of what’s become a bit of a stale genre and casts them in a more grown up and articulate light while still retaining a degree of playfulness.

    At the outset, the honey and fruits are strong, bordering on a tad sickly, but they tame quite fast. The honey is dry—somewhat akin to Tobacco Vanille, and certainly less powdery than Back to Black. The tobacco note is exceptional—what appears to be the same kind of chord that’s been popping up lately in scents such as Tom Ford’s Tobacco Oud. It’s somewhat dusty, hyperreal, and extremely cozy. The fruits seem to lean more toward berry than the standard cherry that this genre leans upon too often, and I think I might even be detecting some strawberry, but it’s all very well rendered. Rather than juicy or tart, the fruits might be described as somewhere between stewed or candied—not overly sweet or syrupy, yet still gourmand. The whole effect is like pressing your nose into a bag of flavored tobacco.

    It wears fantastically—warm, but not cloying—taking the genre to the next level. But what surprised me is that Duchaufour is behind this one as, frankly, I haven’t been that moved by anything he’s done for some time. This is thoughtful and expressive as opposed to predictable and trite (although I will add that the dry down is a lame, off-the-shelf amber). It’s not reinventing the wheel, but it’s certainly building upon what has come along before with some style of its own. Wide appeal is clearly part of this fragrance’s design, but not at the expense of taste; there’s no cheap gimmickry or paraphrasing of what came before. Although it’s not exactly to my taste, it is something I would wear on occasion during the colder months. For fans of tobacco-centric perfumes, honeyed fruit scents, and Naomi Goodsir’s other releases, this should be on your radar.

    01st July, 2014

    Taskphorce01's avatar

    United States United States

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    AnOther 13 by Le Labo

    Clean to the core....What does it smell like? Yes, the resemblance is there...of a brand new magazine taken out of the plastic and opened for the first time(That fresh smell of the magazine paper)... But, it is so much more than that. I use this fragrance so much in the warm weather because I never get bored with it. In general, I prefer iso e super and ambroxan and in this fragrance, both notes are pushed to the max. The cleanliness can be described as "sterile", metallic, salty sweet, velvety and smooth....NOT clean like laundry....or fresh cotton. This fragrance is very hard to dislike. Another 13 is one of my favorite offerings from this house aside from Gaiac 10.

    30th June, 2014 (Last Edited: 08 July, 2014)

    Taskphorce01's avatar

    United States United States

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    parfums*PARFUMS Series 6 Synthetic: Dry Clean by Comme des Garçons

    Fortunately, I was able to snag a bottle of this fragrance (which happened to be laying around in a C.D.G. shop...miraculously!?!?) with the help of a friend who lives half way across the globe. Imagine the smell of a freshly chlorinated indoor swimming pool, now think of Downy liquid fabric softener. Dissolvents, natural smells, synthetic chemicals (nail polish remover?) and the intermingling of these notes sounds scary but somehow it all works wonderfully. Incredibly CLEAN and super attractive. Such a shame that this is discontinued which makes my bottle even more precious :)

    30th June, 2014 (Last Edited: 03 July, 2014)

    Captain's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Rush by Gucci

    Reading through the reviews here I did not know what to expect at all. “Chewy peach” “plastic”? Read Tania Sanchez’ review uh okay. Sometimes you wonder what those two are actually sniffing. XD

    I’m not a fan of fruit especially over whelming, over ripe peach. But, all the reviews, even the not so favourable, point to the fact that it’s not your run of the mill boring peach!

    Okay, so, “lactonic” is indeed accurate. It’s very milky and smooth, it reminds me in some ways of Bottega Veneta, has the same smooth and milky quality. But, thankfully, I get no fruit in BV or Rush, not apricots or peaches. I get the claims of “plastic” in Rush as well and I think this is why I’m not going to rush (heh) out get a full bottle. Trying to think of where I would wear this fragrance…it’s not really me though I don't mind loud but this is just weird. But, I get it and love the initial blast the most, it gets more plastic-y as time goes on. I also love the bottle! Definitely needs to be tried, it’s almost impossible to explain.

    30th June, 2014 (Last Edited: 02 July, 2014)

    drseid's avatar

    United States United States

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    Rose L'Orange by April Aromatics

    Rose L'Orange skips any signs of top notes, moving immediately to its heart. During the heart the composition focuses on a strong dull orange and mandarin tandem with a soapy aldehyde-infused rose joining in prominent support. During the late dry-down the dull orange, mandarin and rose notes remain, now softened by moderately powdery vanilla in the base. Projection is average, as is longevity at 8-10 hours on skin.

    There is not much to write about Rose L'Orange. The notes indicated in the composition name definitely are present and drive its highly linear development -- what little there is of it. For an all-natural composition this one has a slightly artificial smelling bent to the dull orange, somewhat reminding me of unpleasant orange flavored children's medication. While the composition shares some similarities to this unpleasant childhood memory, Rose L'Orange really is not nearly as bad, and once you get to the late dry-down the powdery vanilla takes a bite out of the dull orange-led floral assault providing the best part of the development by far. The bottom line is the $225 per 30 ml bottle Rose L'Orange is a decent linear minimalist offering from April Aromatics that earns an "above average" 2.5 to 3 stars out of 5 rating. This is near immediately forgettable and even more-so when its relatively high price is taken into account. Pass.

    30th June, 2014

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    Ô Hira by Stéphane Humbert Lucas 777

    While the note breakdown for Stéphane Humbert Lucas 777's Ô Hira has been kept veiled, it's not too difficult to pull out the main player in this earthy, resinous blend: labdanum. The fragrance itself is quite sparse, inviting deep concentration on the resins at hand and instantly pegging Ô Hira as a high-brow, complicated affair. Pitched as an oriental, Ô Hira is really more of a reference labdanum and I’d even place it as a touchstone of dark, resinous perfumery. For all its simplicity, the materials are captivating and the scent might be described best as a showcase of sorts.

    There are really just a couple of things going on here. First, and most prominent, is the labdanum that dominates. It's pristine and three dimensional—chiseled down from the more unwieldy raw material into something polite and tasteful on its own. Much of the grit of labdanum’s bottom end and the shrill turpenic nuances of the top have been equalized, rendering the note as smooth and somewhat ghostly. I'm certain that there's ambergris in this—and quite a lot of it as well. This sits alongside the labdanum and can be identified by a subtle marine aspect—almost brine-like, but quite tame. It's rich and prominent, so either the perfume is using a generous amount of the good stuff, or there are some nifty new synths being deployed as to perhaps support a more holistic amount. When placed against the labdanum, it adds a musky sweetness that counters the resin perfectly.

    Apparently, there's fossilized amber in this, but I don't pick up on much of it if it's there. This material is essentially the resin of ancient conifers and is often known as a terpenoid. While rarely used in perfumery (and never used in commercial perfumery), fossilized amber bears no resemblance to the warm fantasy note common in oriental perfumes. Yet it's a material that's readily available for about $200 per ounce and is best described as smoky, leathery, and a bit rubbery too. I have a small amount of this material myself and it's far from pleasant, but it's certainly evocative. Really, the only other perceptible items are some other resins (myrrh, styrax, perhaps) and some spices (mainly cinnamon, from what I can gather). It's all intertwined and really does require some analytical sniffing to make out the individual components.

    Consequently, Ô Hira wears like a clean, refined labdanum with turpenic undertones. It's both subtly sweet and subtly smoky with trace amounts of sappy green too, but much of this comes from the labdanum itself. These facets are incredibly delicate and hard to detect, reaffirming that the scent is more of a meditation than a fully-fledged perfume. Also, there are sour and bitter aspects that conjure up the kind of feeling you get when you lick a battery or perhaps a copper penny. It's ever so slightly metallic, bringing up, for me, images of metal gates covered in creeping ivy and branches, or perhaps those beautiful deco wrought iron entrances to the Paris subway. It doesn't transition much, but it does seem to smooth over any residual harshness from the resins, spending the remainder of its life as a smooth, crystalline labdanum. It's engaging and beautiful, but it's really not a traditional amber oriental and there's not a lot to it.

    This retails for $825 for a 50ml bottle. Is it worth it? Well, that's relative, but I'd harbor that even though it does use a few exceptional materials, this pricing is outlandish. While not quite as obnoxiously priced (per ml) as another recent oriental Dead of Night, Ô Hira just doesn't offer enough to warrant its price tag. This is a really a scent for those who adore resins and have the patience to spend some time getting to know them a little more. It's a very good representation of labdanum, but even at half the current retail, it'd already be an imposition.

    30th June, 2014

    purplebird7's avatar

    United States United States

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    Rume by Slumberhouse

    Prunes. Fruitcake. Mincemeat pie. Rum. Candied citrus peel. This registers as gourmand. Red wine note, or fermented grapes. Honeyed labdanum. I like it, but I'm not falling hard for it.

    30th June, 2014

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Ambre Gris by Perris Monte Carlo

    The opening is quite dense and bold, a earthy-ambery dusty and somehow metallic concoction of animalic notes, amber (both ambroxan, more dry and austere, and a light sweet amber note). there is also a prominent salty note all over, which I guess being due to aromachemicals. The nuances floating around the central axe of amber: a chypre accord of rose, geranium, musk, benzoin, vanillin, quite linear, restrained, like "frozen" in a shop window. So far so "meh", but the drydown is more interesting, it loses a bit of (frankly disappointing) "artificiality" and settles on a really pleasant and enveloping accord of ultra-dusty vanilla, with an airy, rarefied, chalky amber accord on an elegant, white-rose powdery and softly woody sheet. The overall allure becomes more fascinating, an austere and dusty scent, romantic and powdery, nothing stunning but more complex and charming than the synthetic-salty ambroxan opening. Like many niche scents of today, it has an overall "lack of substance" and depth, it smells good with that particular sort of transparent "dustiness" of many contemporary scents, but somehow a bit pale, although I guess that may be an intentional stylistic choice. However a versatile, discreet, inoffensive, decently elegant scent, not really worth its cost but nice.

    6,5-7/10

    30th June, 2014

    purplebird7's avatar

    United States United States

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    Sana by Slumberhouse

    Lightly floral, salty, soapy, diffusive. As non-tactile as an electric current or ozone. This is a miss.

    30th June, 2014

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Marni by Marni

    Patchouli, flowers (rose and others), cumin, then lively, zesty and juicy fruity/citrus notes, discreet woods. A cozy and pleasant spring landscape, fresh, wet, tasty, incredibly pleasant and with an overall surprising good quality – surprising for me, as when approaching this I was ready for another boring, derivative designer scent, while instead it's a totally respectable floral-woody-incense scent with a good harmony of dense and invigorating notes. A bit artificial (that "contemporary" aldehydes metallic note) but somehow alive and bright, as alive and bright as other more renowned (and praised, and costly) scents, both designer and nice. As minutes pass it emerges a cedar-incense accord, synthetic as well but pleasant, which leads to a silky floral-woody long-lasting drydown, with no disappointments. A totally decent, even nice scent, well made, tasty, versatile, not that distinctive but honest and honestly priced.

    7/10

    30th June, 2014

    kumquat's avatar

    United States United States

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    French Cancan by Caron

    I must preface this review with a caveat; there are two versions of this juice. An American import and one made in France for sale only in Europe. I first sampled the American version in New York around 2006. It smelled like a strong amber and dead flowers. Then a year or so later, I discovered that only potable alcohol was used in European perfume- due to antiquated laws reaching back to Prohibition Era. While poisonous additives are added to the US imports and cheaper, harsher alcohol is used. This may sometimes affect the smell of the perfume. I got the idea to order 'French CanCan' based solely on the notes. I felt that it might be better than the sample I had had in New York.

    I was not disappointed! The French version is a creamy and rich floral in which each note seems to jump forward. Amber and sandalwood support rose, violet, Lily-of-the-valley and jasmine- and all nearly simultaneously. I used to think there was heliotrope here but it's not listed. This is just a glorious floral that's not too sweet. It's dignified, yet joyful. The oak moss is still lovely, too even with every body breathing down their necks- this is still a chypre. As you can tell, I'm a fan of the Parisian juice- parfum. I guess the overall effect is spicy- carnation like, but it's more violet and jasmine, too. And rose- don't forget the rose! I feel dizzy.

    30th June, 2014

    purplebird7's avatar

    United States United States

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    Sova by Slumberhouse

    Heavy, syrupy. Molasses. Lots of hay absolute is in this -- and that is a complex aroma. Fermented tobacco. Animalic, fecal or leather notes. Brown and oozing. It's pleasant because I like the smell of hay in the sun, but it's difficult because hay absolute is denser and sweeter than hay in real life -- drying in the air. This is moist, raisin-like, concentrated scent. I give it points for boldness, creative kudos for working with hay absolute, one of the most distinctive aromas in the world.

    30th June, 2014

    purplebird7's avatar

    United States United States

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    Mare by Slumberhouse

    Nix. Ghastly. Melon. Apple. Over-ripe tropical fruits plus the same "spoiled" or moldy note that I disliked in Pear + Olive. Sweet and rotten aroma. Fermenting compost pile of fruit. Why does no one else mention fruit? It's a sweet-tart fruit like mango or berries. It's powerful and watery like Calone. It's a melange of tart fruits left in the sun too long. Other people are calling this green. My definition of green is galbanum, tomato leaf, violet leaf, shiso, green tea, grass, cilantro, and some of the mints. This does not say "leaves" to me. Where are people finding notes for this? Regardless; whatever it is, it's not to my liking.

    30th June, 2014

    purplebird7's avatar

    United States United States

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    Baque by Slumberhouse

    This smells like part of Ore -- the hardwood mulch and resin that glows warmly-- without the edible caramel, chocolate, and booze. I find it soft and wearable. Fruit notes are faint, existing only as part of a flavored tobacco leaf. I'm pretty neutral on this, and I'd put it behind Ore, which takes a clear direction and has the feel of a "finished" product. I was surprised to find that Baque didn't predate Ore because it smells more like a prototype. Then again, deconstruction is an art form. So, think Ore-minus-gourmand, and you are well set to enjoy Baque.

    30th June, 2014

    Sly2scents's avatar

    United States United States

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    Herod by Parfums de Marly

    I like it but the price tag is a mountain for me. The notes from top to bottom is blended well although I have issues with the longevity on my skin which would also prevent me from purchasing a full bottle of this but a decant would be nice to have.

    30th June, 2014

    Taskphorce01's avatar

    United States United States

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    Blue Encens by Comme des Garçons

    This is one of the most gorgeous incense blends I've experienced and I'm also comparing to Amouage BUT BUT BUT.....it evaporates off of my skin in literally 1 hour.... It does evoke a cool, blue effect, and it is easily wearable in heat which is impressive. Very fresh, metallic, crisp incense is the best way I can describe it.... The sillage is about average. I wish it lasted longer and projected better. I say this.......if you love incense and you are a fan of Comme des Garcons.....this is a must try. I wouldn't have sold my bottle had this lasted longer but the performance was absolutely abysmal.

    30th June, 2014

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

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    L'Arte di Gucci by Gucci

    A great rose chypre.

    Barbara Herman finds it black, inky, animalic, and the dry down to be of a rosy leather.

    It ranks up there with the very best rose chypres, including Lalique's Perles, Brousseau's Coriandre, and Guerlain's Nahema.

    Top notes Bergamot, Coriander
    Middle notes: Rose, Jasmine, Geranium, Tuberose, Orris, Muguet
    Bast notes: Patchouli, Vetiver, Leather, Amber, Musk, Oakmoss

    It is for me the only Gucci scent that can be called great - dark, romantic, mysterious, long-lasting. For the mature woman on a winter night - opera, pearls, seduction.

    YES!

    If you love rose chypres, look no further for what may be the greatest of them all.

    30th June, 2014

    funhuntr's avatar

    Philippine Philippine

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    White Citrus by Bath and Body Works

    Tart and zesty, a great pick-me-up scent for hot days. A very easy wear.

    30th June, 2014

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