Latest Fragrance Reviews, Updated Daily

    Showing 631 to 660 of 717.
    rynegne's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Calling All Angels by April Aromatics

    Good, but not great. Has nothing on NK Incense. Natural, sure...but not worth the money if I am to be honest. Labdanum, incense and vanilla with some light woods.

    08th February, 2015

    flathorn's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Sballo by Bruno Acampora

    How is it possible to make Sballo in this day of oakmoss restrictions? Though it isn't listed as an ingredient, this fragrance has such an immediate dense, dark, rough oakmossy note, it took my breath away. True to the real deal, Sballo turned darker as it aged, lasting a good long while, that glorious ashy dark dry down of oakmoss. It was heaven to smell. I am grateful. All chypreholics still mourning the loss of the great vintage chypres will enjoy sampling Sballo. It may fill a hole for you as it has done for me.
    I loved Fendi and Sballo has reminiscences of it though I don't have Fendi now for comparison. It brings to mind many other dark classic chypres, though the comparison matters little, except that it compares well to the memory of several I loved. What comes to mind are classic florals - rose, violet, orange blossom, geranium - embedded and glowing from a leathery oakmoss matrix; that feral roughness so different from animalics - oakmoss has a mind and is not driven by its hormones. That to me always made oakmoss in a fragrance more edgy. Oakmoss is never driven, it drives. If you've gone through the long slow chypre withdrawal, years in duration, as I have, this will be a pleasure to wear.
    It has a restrained smoulder, the thing which beguiles me about classic chypres - the way these ashy, kind of rough, dark fragrances with submerged florals seem more compellingly sexy than their flirtier floral counterparts, the difference between wearing a cashmere dress or a red rayon short dress in a bar. Sballo is refined, luxurious, cerebral, rich in notes, but tactful, which is a large component of tastefulness. I love the way classic chypres dress up and down so well and this one is no exception. Go for a walk on a raw October day in the forest, to a conference, on a date - it will do all of them well. It really is an admirable fragrance, chypre or not, but I especially recommend it for lovers of the classic chypres. I tried the oil - I heard the spray may be a little smoother.

    07th February, 2015 (Last Edited: 18th February, 2015)

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Cathedral by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

    A superb incense blend. I am most familiar with such blends, having frequented a number of monastic communities as guest and purchased same.

    The olibanum (frankincense), myrrh combination here is beautifully balanced and “true.” I also detect cedar, amber and a cinnamon note. I like this far better than DSH's Adoration, which seemed to me like a not quite realized stop on the way to achieving perfection with Cathedral.

    Cathedral is dry, yet warm, and most appealing for both sexes. Quite a fine and subtle olfactory achievement.

    07th February, 2015 (Last Edited: 17th February, 2015)

    montagne's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    Saat Safa by Al Rehab

    'Saat Safa' in Arabic means something like "the hour of clarity" or "the lucid hour". Something like that.

    And, indeed, there is some veritas to be had with this vino.

    I don't get a big barnyard oud from this at all. I get a beautifully balanced white-flowered mossy patchouli, with a translucence as befits the name.

    After 10 hours or so a splendid mellow vetiver evolves, and dominates the wake.

    To understand everything is to forgive everything, it has been said. Wearing this fragrance, I feel myself sprinkled with a little bit of that enlightening dust.

    07th February, 2015 (Last Edited: 08th February, 2015)

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Santal Wood by Montale

    Really just a "an idea" of sandalwood (in the depth of background). As well as previously pointed out by other reviewers Montale Saltal Wood is a dynamic-sporty (barely) woody (and more properly musky-balmy-spicy) aroma with an initial calonic-salty-citric-aromatic vibe, a typical violet/woods mastering (vaguely powdery and sweeter) central accord and a final boring synthetic (somewhat) transparent soapiness enriched by green fresh elements and diaphanous (somewhat gingery-cardamomish in style) resins. Along dry down the calonic/ozonic metallic vibe disappears leaving place to a soapy-spicy-musky fluidity (vaguely a la Bvlgari Pour Homme Blv but a tad less soapy-spicy and "bombastic"). Not a disaster (a pleasant one on the contrary) but basically a mediocre/conventional aroma with "neither art nor part", over all something surely unworthy the price. For such a type of fragrances I better recommend Canali Men (for a more distinguished and less soapy-spicy solution), Soprani Solo, L'Erbolario Corteccia or (in case you wanna dare with greens containing the soapy spices) Trussardi Action Uomo.

    07th February, 2015 (Last Edited: 08th February, 2015)

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Louban by Montale

    Montale Louban is a pleasant scent, not more. At the beginning it seemed to be dealing with a traditional (and not particularly innovative) rose-oudh-patchouli-musk combo (with a touch of "oriental" hesperidic/earthy/medicinal) but in a while the striking violet leaves presence takes "influencing the scene" providing a more changeful, dark-mysterious and velvety wave enriching the soapy-rosey woodsiness (vaguely a la Nabeel Telaal). Of course I see points in common with the darker, more rosey and temperamental Black Aoud which anyway plays (especially at the beginning) a more stout/bold, arabic, bohemian and resinous type of game. I catch the typical "violet soap" undertone pairing the rose/hesperidic presence and it provides a more typically western touch of modern velvety mystery. The Louban's dry down is typically soapy/laundry and musky/botanic with spicy-rosey and earthy undertones but unfortunately it is nowadays too much close to more that several flowers/oudh combos to fully "hit the nail". Anyway a nice resinous floral alternative to dozens further "alternatives of the alternatives" out there.

    07th February, 2015 (Last Edited: 08th February, 2015)

    munch357's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Aigner No. 1 Oud by Etienne Aigner

    I'm not an oud expert, but this one smells rich and creamy. I like the way it smells on my skin, but the animalistic part lingers on my clothes which is going to get sometime to get used to smelling.

    07th February, 2015 (Last Edited: 08th February, 2015)

    Champs Elysee's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Narciso by Narciso Rodriguez

    There is something about this I am not keen on, slightly too bitter for me. I will persevere with it though.

    07th February, 2015

    sjg3839's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Lanvin L'Homme Sport by Lanvin

    Not a sport scent at all, it is a nice fragrance though. Starts off kind of citrus base and slightly green. The patchouli hangs around for a while, which makes the scent even better. Was lucky enough to get a tester bottle for $20.00. Best $20.00 I spent in a while on a fragrance. Projection and longevity are above average. Fantastic fragrance. 8/10

    07th February, 2015

    rogalal's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Hermèssence Osmanthe Yunnan by Hermès

    An interesting first minute-or-two of juicy mandarin, light peach, vodka, and fennel all very quickly settle into a dull smell that reminds me of a vaguely peppery sheet of blank paper, or possibly the vegetal smell of a flower without an odor.

    Besides a belabored metaphor or a modern art piece about the smell of unscented things, I don't see the point of this. The opening citrus is done better in Eau de Mandarin Ambre, and the odd peppery vegetal paper smell is fully fleshed out and better executed in Eau de Gentiane Blanche. The osmanthus is barely more than a wisp of peach. If this had been anything other than a Jean Claude Ellena, I wouldn't have spent so long trying to convince myself to like it.

    07th February, 2015

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Jako by Lagerfeld

    Well this is a peculiar scent indeed. Deceptively simple, to say the least, and easily dismissable as just another synthetic designer (as if these were both negative points per se, by the way...). Basically Jako is a sort of plummy-citrus-soapy-woody (sandalwood) scent with a really clean look and a filthier musky-leather undertone, like a guy living a double life. Spicy notes and sweet nuances are there, mostly coming from tonka and vanilla, but they’re tamed down enough; more than sweet, Jako appears rather powdery to me, with a general slight smokiness, perfectly blended with all the brighter stuff – citrus, sandalwood, plum. The opening shows a juicy fruity accord which however vanishes quite quickly, at least partially, leading Jako to woodier and more “greyish” territories. It may sound a bit messy, but it’s just complex (more than it may seem), while smelling perfectly nice, clean, modern and fairly understated. Basically it smells like a martian hybrid between something like Jaipur Homme (for the spicy powderiness), the citrus-tart milkiness à la Kenzo Jungle Homme, and a couple of Lang’s, notably Cuiron for the plummy-leather stuff, and Eau de Cologne for the clean aseptic muskiness. All with that late-‘90s feel – a bit synthetic, a bit tacky, but in a good way. Somewhere at the crossroad lies Jako, with a couple of differences: it’s more subtle than all of those, and it has a couple of more peculiar nuances – something medicinal for instance, like cough syrup, and a slight, weird moldy feel underneath the rest. Overall I find Jako much interesting, quite pleasant to wear (regardless of its "interest"), fairly modern and really easy to pull off - you can forget about its complexity and stuff and just enjoy a clean, bright, discreet scent. The sweet-powdery notes make it undoubtedly a bit feminine, but in my opinion Jako remains overall actually quite androgynous and even a bit aloof – like a futuristic “robot dandy” if you want. Also, with some nice darker shades; the musk, the leather. It’s close to skin as I said, but you feel its understated radiance for many hours. The main flaw for me is the drydown, which is kind of boring and a little disappointing (light, short-lived and a bit “sweaty”).

    7/10

    07th February, 2015

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Patchouli Precieux / Patchouli Antique by Les Néréides

    Simple, austere, honest: in one word, good. Patchouli Antique is a totally good and respectable patchouli scent containing basically nothing more and nothing less than what a patchouli fan would want, with all its nuances: from earthy-rooty to balsamic, from stale-moldy to its dusty heart of cocoa-beans like notes. Pretty much nothing else except for a pleasant feel of warm, slightly sweet amber, mixed to a subtle and dusty musky note. Not too sweet, not too raw, just nice and cozy. Nothing really “antique” though, so don’t get fooled by the name: nothing decadent or nostalgic like in LM Parfums’ Patchouli Bohème or Parfumerie Générale’s Intrigant Patchouli. Still a totally good perfume, simple, rich, solid, probably not groundbreaking but an unpretentious, everyday gem for all patchouli lovers. It costs pennies, so grab one if you like this note. The longevity is a bit weak, though, but for the price and the concentration it’s fine.

    7-7,5/10

    07th February, 2015

    vitorscpaiva's avatar

    Brazil Brazil

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Dior Homme Parfum by Christian Dior

    Got a sample and I'm trying the 2nd time today. It seems to me the iris note is less dominant comparing to the EDT and EDP.. Leather, along with sandalwood dominates the fragrance. I can detect a soapy rose smoothing the fragrance, and a touch of oud making it a bit daring. This is a sumptuous and luxurious scent, much more mature then EDT and EDP. Sillage is huge, even tought it easily causes olfactory fatigue to the wearer.

    07th February, 2015

    FumeHood's avatar

    Brazil Brazil

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Ruh Al Oudh Attar by Amouage

    Not for the faint of heart, Ruh al Oudh is (was) a special edition attar (released alongside Ruh al Ward - a death-by-rose oil) and it is a scent that attempts to get to the heart of the Oud matter without much added frippery. I have never smelled the pure version of Amouage's Silver Oudh pure (a supposedly cleaner and brighter take on our that I am told makes up a happy fraction of their most lauded attar: Homage), or the luxury-priced Oud al Khaloud, so I cannot compare Ruh Al Oudh with other attars that are marketed as the closest thing to pure oud oil that Amouage has produced.

    The most interesting facet of the oil is its density. I own several Amoauge attars and none come anywhere near the deep chocolate color or incredible viscocity of this oil. So much so, in fact, that it is a bit difficult to apply it lightly; the drop size is easily 2-3 times what you get from the same glass wand when dipped in Homage, Tribute, Molook, etc. It hits the skin thick and oily is so dense that the brown color can be seen even when gently spread over my arm.

    The smell presentes the following, and all at once: damp mineral earth, a creamy lacquered veneer, and a good dose of barnyard. If Xerjoff's Zafar or Abdes Salaam's Oud Caravan made you uncomfortable in their "dirty" elements, I would stay far from Ruh al Oudh. As someone not so turned off by a little skank, I find this quite deep and sensual. It is not particularly smokey, but it and last for 24 hours with a consistent sweetness. It gets a thumbs up for being the closest to the pure oud oil samples I have , but Ruh al Oud is certainly not as engineered in the traditional perfume sense as other blends and does not seem to have top, mid, and base layers. For this reason it may not appear to those looking for the "pretty"

    I like to nab a drop in the evening and use it as a meditative scent, but have yet to have the courage to give this a full wear out in this city of 20 million and close contact. In fact, I have had most success with layering, especially with the sweet saffron of Asrar attar - another beauty but somewhat linear in its evolution. I find that the combo of dark out and the sweet baked nature of Asrar made for a really nice combo.

    Other combos (with the heavy ambergris blends or with the tobacco sparkle of Tribute) were less successful, as the Ruh al Oud detracts from their perfection and just made them turn sour and "muddy". However, it added a particularly nice depth to Homage, butching the florals up quite a bit without muting the sparkle - this was probably my favorite layering experiment. The combo presented something that I had failed to detect in either - a clear Berry note that seemed to replace the citrus top of Homage.

    The fact that I devote so much of a review to layering suggests that Ruh al Oud alone is, perhaps, just not enough. Fair enough, but it's the most straight-forward dark and sappy oud oil (and who knows how much oud is really in there) so it is a welcomed addition to the wardrobe for reference purposes. What I can say is that it smells so overwhelmingly natural, organic, REAL. Next to it, other oud blends and perfumes claiming that ingredient feel like synthetic imitations.

    07th February, 2015

    nosyneighbor's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    Divine Folie by Jean Patou

    This is what they mean by "perfume as art". Divine Folie was a statement on the cheap decadence of the party that was the Jazz Age leading up to the Great Crash. Opens with a sharp blast of ylang ylang over some muddled florals with a dash of eugenol and some kind of waxy oiliness reminiscent of waking up in your makeup. It's surprisingly lovely with a madeleine-like vanilla / iris combo, which I presume is where the rose, jasmine and neroli ended up. It lasts for a while, but it's a very close wear.

    07th February, 2015

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Fleurs d'Oranger by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

    If you love neroli, you will never find a more concentrated fragrance totally devoted to this most delicate of flowers than DSH's Fleurs d'Oranger.

    Two nerolis, sourced from Tunisia and Egypt, combine with sweet and bitter orange notes, orange flower absolute and float over beeswax, vetiver and ambergris.

    It's almost ethereal, with its high olfactory range, like a beautiful theme played in the violins and arcing upwards to hold in flight, hovering, the lark truly ascending.

    Beautiful, very feminine, quite subtle.

    07th February, 2015

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Piment et Chocolat by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

    An exceptional gourmand scent and one of the few truly successful re-creations of cocoa.

    The spiciness of adding red chiles to hot chocolate, a treat both for the nose and the palate, only came into mainstream knowledge with the successful film, CHOCOLAT (Juliette Binoche), and now we have an equivalent for the nose alone.

    Pimento, Chiles and Paprika float above Clove, Nutmeg and Cinnamon, resting on Cocoa Beans and Chocolate. It morphs into a dreamy, tobacco-like warmth that is irresistible

    Another triumph for DSH!

    07th February, 2015

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Le Smoking by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

    Complex and multi-layered, this is a truly daring scent.

    It steps outside the comfortable realm of pipe tobacco, warm, cherry/honey humidor – and strikes out for the cigarette no man’s (or woman’s) land, where more than one attempt to duplicate or improve the iconic Caron Tabac Blond has failed miserably.
    Le Smoking succeeds admirably.

    First a bitter blast of what seems to me a mix of patchouli, vetiver and actual cigarette smoke, it certainly grabs your attention. It then rounds these edges, removing the sharpness and adding a sophisticated, amberish warmth that nevertheless does not abandon the central cigarette smoke accord.

    Most creators in the past have gone for the obvious re-creation of the unburned cigarette tobacco, but Le Smoking revels in the actual smoke, rising from a lit cigarette.
    The effect is that of a nicely perfumed woman, sitting in a Mediterranean hotel lobby, smoking a very fine gauloise. If Audrey Hepburn were a smoker, it would be she, Givenchy hat and veil in place, waiting for Cary Grant to join her for a tisane.

    Unique and quite splendid!

    07th February, 2015

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Adoration (Milan) by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

    This begins rather harshly with an unpleasantly sharp turpentine/linseed oil/menthol burst that made me sad, thinking, oh, no, a DSH scent that I will not like at all.
    Patience, patience.

    Always wait until the dry down. The amber and rose calm the raw frankincense/myrrh blend that I was initially smelling and warm it considerably.

    Though a bit strong to my nose, it does quickly become eminently wearable, though it would seem more suited for men than women.

    Not for everyone, but definitely a must try for those loving incense based scents.

    07th February, 2015

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Amuse Bouche by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

    The initial burst of berries reminded me a great deal of Mugler’s Angel, that gourmand original that changed the map of scent, introducing center stage fruit salad to the list of perfume types.

    Then the warm, supporting notes of sandalwood and vanilla entered, rounding out the experience. I like this better than Angel. It is not “neon,” but buttery and cuddly.

    I am reminded of those Christmas scents in the air of clever shops that make you just want to buy and buy. This would be outstanding as a room refresher.

    One of DSH’s happiest scents.

    07th February, 2015

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Café Noir by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

    My nose immediately detects cinnamon and cedar, even though the latter does not seem to be part of the scent’s make up – I’m referring to the booklet that comes with The Passport To Paris collection.

    The coffee emerges slowly, still mixed with cinnamon.

    It somehow smells like Christmas morning to me – not a bad thing. Olfactory memories have a life of their own.

    A lovely, warm, gourmand.

    07th February, 2015

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Vers la Violette by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

    A violet leather? How unique. Why has no one thought of this before?

    Modern perfumery is after all only 130 years old – you’d think someone would have gone down that road.

    The amazing thing is that it totally works. At first, I was skeptical. I got a blast of green violet, but then just turpentine and wood for about five minutes. Then the heart settled in – light, dry violet and the subtlest of European leather scents, which arm in arm stroll down the aisle to the altar.

    Very unisex in its dryness. The orris works very well to support the violet. Hmmm – might an orris leather be next?

    Another triumph – so unique I am telling all my olfactory friends.

    07th February, 2015

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Passport à Paris by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

    A wonderful tribute to both Jicky and Fougere Royale.

    The scent combines lavender and patchouli as a pungent base (fougere) for the amber, vanilla Jicky overlay.

    This is a lovely balance of fougere and Jicky elements. The amber and the vanilla are standouts, floating delicately over the fougere base.

    07th February, 2015

    sjg3839's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    A*Men Ultra Zest by Thierry Mugler

    Ultra Zest still has that A*Men DNA on the drydown. Just had to get that out the way. The opening spray has a nice orange creamsicle vibe. A nice amount of spice and caramel in the midnotes give this a year round fragrance. 7.5/10

    07th February, 2015

    rogalal's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    L'Orpheline by Serge Lutens Les Salons du Palais Royal Shiseido

    Boring. Like a watercolor painting with brushstrokes so thin and limpid that their swirls of white actually just look like unpainted canvas.

    What does it smell like? Chemicals. Chemicals that vaguely bring to mind oak and lavendar, but in a pool of empty haze. It's sort of burnt in the base, and it goes through a stage where it smells like that cheap aquatic "woody amber" chemical.

    In a way, there's a certain artistry involved in making a perfume that broadcasts so weirdly, like a bubble of subtle scent that wraps around the wearer while the smell to the wearer himself feels so chemically-thinned and barely there. Anyway, I think this falls into the category of "thin woods", one of my least favorite perfume genres. I don't want to pay money to smell nondescript at best, and unscented at worst.

    07th February, 2015

    HAllen's avatar

    England England

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Vétiver Moloko by Ex Nihilo

    Just a quick review to say that I really like this house and I thought this was their best offering. I recently discovered them and the uniqueness to the brand is quite refreshing, with the ability to add notes to fragrances that you buy.

    I came away with a sample of this after toying with the entire line, which I think currently consists of about 8 fragrances.

    I thought the milk accord really softened this to a lovely creamy vetiver, but it still has a really beautiful rooty green-ness that shines in the opening.

    I'm very interested in how this house evolves. Good job, Ex Nihilo.

    07th February, 2015

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Caravan Spice by Dawn Spencer Hurwitz

    A richer, deeper, rounder version of DHS's own Indus.

    Here the oils are blended more heavily than with the Indus composition, the latter seemingly a blend of fresh ground spices. Here I get the feeling of the great perfumes from the 1940s – heavy, sophisticated, mature.

    Notes include: Amber, Cedarwood, Cardamom, Carnation, Coriander, Vanilla, Bulgarian Rose, Jasmine with Frankincnese, Myrrh, Parchouli and Oakmoss as base notes.

    Indus for the young, Caravan Spice for the mature. Both excellent ambers spice orientals.

    06th February, 2015 (Last Edited: 17th February, 2015)

    vipersinthefield's avatar



    Show all reviews

    rating


    English Leather Spiced by Dana

    If I had to guide Spiced by English Leather to someone I would veer it towards a fan of Jade East.A little bit of leather in the opening but it becomes very subtle maybe tied with a little musk.And there is that little bit of floral spice like you'd come across in Jade East.As another reviewer mentioned there is a baby powder familiarity that is the dominant note but it's backed with something a little muscular.It's an okay cologne from the MEM days.I never called it English Leather Spiced because you expect it's name to be a more dimensional yet still as strong English Leather scent.Some spice yes but an oriental fashioned scent.

    06th February, 2015 (Last Edited: 16th February, 2015)

    Wild Gardener's avatar

    France France

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Paul Smith London for Men by Paul Smith

    Not much to add to the excellent note descriptions provided by Way Off Centre and others, except to say I suspect the spiky texture in the top note is provided by pink pepper, eugenyl acetate and citral.

    There's a strong chemical feel to the profile. It includes a powerful melamine-like harsh woody-plastic note that persists almost from the start, and continues relentlessly into the depths. I should admit I'm hypernosmic to this material as well as finding it repulsive, and when it's part of a formula, that perfume effectively becomes unwearable for me. (Anyone who knows what it is please PM)

    This could have been just another face in the crowd of fresh woody masculines, but thanks to Antoine
    Lie's skill it rose above the mediocrity we have come to expect of this genre, displaying an interesting evolution from spiky mandarin through violet leaf to creamy wood.

    Way too synthetic, but an interesting frag and worth checking out if you find it, but not worth spending money on in my opinion.

    It could have been good, but with a formula that includes a molecule now used in bathroom cleaner, it smells just too cheap to be a contender.

    06th February, 2015 (Last Edited: 07th February, 2015)

    Yoha75's avatar

    Canada Canada

    Show all reviews

    rating


    Mont St Michel by Mont St Michel

    I came across this brand at a supermarket near my house in Montreal, Qc. They have 5 of their fragrances. I picked Ambree Authentique but the others was as much attractive to my nose. Good stuff for 11 can.$.

    06th February, 2015 (Last Edited: 07th February, 2015)

    Showing 631 to 660 of 717.




Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000