Latest Fragrance Reviews, Updated Daily

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    flathorn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Palermo by Byredo

    Pretty nice, but not good enough to buy. I was hoping this might make a good travel fragrance, but on me, it didn't produce a fragrance with much chops. There was a nice pettigrain and slightly bitter grapefruit expression that lingered on the skin for hours which ended with pale wooded florals. It was a nice mild skin scent after a few hours, but I just wanted a little more. On my skin some of the notes didn't quite emerge, so the fragrance ended up feeling incomplete and lacking.

    09th April, 2015 (Last Edited: 19th April, 2015)

    flathorn's avatar

    United States United States

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    Light Blue Escape to Panarea by Dolce & Gabbana

    Escape To Panarea is a light juicy pear fragrance, one of two Light Blue feminine travel/spa fragrances. It's not too bad, and that's saying a lot because it really skirts the edge of frivolous fruity floral. It's breezy, doesn't get too sugary, is kind of full and voluptuous in a spa sort of way. It has a light musky fruity background that's kind of soft and yummy. So yeah, everything I should dislike but this fragrance keeps it all within bounds, so I kind of like it. I haven't tried it next to Montale's Wild Pears - both of them are decidedly pear - but this one is softer and fluffier. I'd like to try them side by side. It lasts around 3-4 hours. As I mentioned in Light Blue Dreaming in Portofino, I tried these next to the Dior Cruise Collection line, and the Diors were more sophisticated and interesting.

    09th April, 2015 (Last Edited: 10th April, 2015)

    rogalal's avatar

    United States United States

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    Green Irish Tweed by Creed

    After all these years, I still just don't "get" Green Irish Tweed. What is it supposed to smell like? A bucket of melted plastic at the beach? Lemon juice mixed with shea butter? Weird-smelling leaves dipped in metal?

    Whatever it is, it's much richer and substantial than pretty much any other aquatic, though I've never thought it smelled particularly good or understood how people smell this and think it smells "classy". I don't hate it, but I don't particularly like it either.

    I keep waiting to have an "a-ha" moment where something falls into place and I realize how brilliant Green Irish Tweed is, but it's just not happening. Oh well.

    09th April, 2015

    alfarom's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Hatria by Angela Ciampagna

    A good way to realize a fragrance is exceptionally good is when it involves a good amount of notes you're generally not very keen to, and it's still able to completely catch your interest. This is Hatria for me. I'm definitely not a rose-oud combo fan but this composition is so serious that's basically impossible to overlook.

    So, it's a saffrony-rose on top. Very arabic in feel, thick, dark and kind of unpolished and yet completely devoided of the challenging aspect that certain similarly themed fragrances can often show. It's a butch, rich opening but it's immediately joined by a hint of burnt-caramel that tames it a bit while providing some roundness and, paradoxically, even more body. A woody base remarks its presence right away with a leathery-oudy bone-structure and vetiver facets (probably the nagarmotha). It's far removed from the usual dry-woody stuff we're used to when it comes to westerner iterations of oud. The fragrance feels deep and dark yet somewhat smooth, airy and weightless while maintaining a certain thickness throughout. It's bold but not heavy-handed, with an insane lasting-power while being completely able to not result exhausting.

    So classy and masterfully executed to have absolutely nothing to envy to the biggest *hits* in its genre. Seriously, very solid stuff.

    09th April, 2015

    alfarom's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Aer by Angela Ciampagna

    What really compels me about most of the fragrances in the Ciampagna's range, is the level of competence these people transmit. Aer makes no exception.

    A summery take on vetiver loaded with hyper-realistic and never overly synth citruses (a great grapefruit note here), greens and subtle smoky notes. Think about an hypothetical mash up between Roucel's Kenzoair (the anisic, slightly sweet aspect of the vetiver), the smoky-minty facets of Harmatan Noir by Parfumerie Generale and the transparency of some of the most successful latest Hermes. Yes, Aer is all of the above but it also has that subtle twist that makes all the compositions by Angela Ciampagna, something that stand on their own. That certain twist you would expect from, say, Etat Libre D'Orange or even from one of the *easiest* Comme Des Garcons.

    A favortie.


    09th April, 2015

    alfarom's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Kanat by Angela Ciampagna

    Kanat is quite a nostalgic fragrance in my personal experience. I'm probably completely off here but upon application, I can't help it from being immediately teleported to when I was a kid in school and, more precisely, the smell of Coccoina. A kid-safe and extremely popular italian glue which had a fantastic and quite unmistakeable almondy smell. Now, given the notes disclosed, the only thing that could make me remotely think of almonds is probably acacia but it might still be kind of a stretch. Anyway, Coccoina and those days spent cutting images from magazines for doing collages. The warmth of mid-may sun, long days of light and a sense trepidation for the incoming vacations.

    Kanat is all of that for me. It's an evocation of my childhood.

    Beside Coccoina, I smell smooth florals, a hint of medicinal saffron and a soft white musky / vanillic base. Not a fragrance I'm crazy for but if you're drawn to light florals with a twist, give this a chance.

    As with most other fragrances in this line, Kanat never feels cheap or even rushed and it's pretty original too without going necessarily for the weird route.

    09th April, 2015

    Davem81's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Blu Mediterraneo Basil / Foglie di Basilico by Acqua di Parma

    Strong basil, some liquorice and a hint of mintiness. Simple yet rewarding. Very glad I managed to track this long-discontinued gem down!

    09th April, 2015

    odysseusm's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Silvan by Rouge Bunny Rouge

    This gets a neutral because (for me) it is just ok, not compelling.
    Citrus/pepper and wood/incense quickly appear, pretty much simultaneously. A bit smoky once in while, but only a bit. It is a pleasant woody-incense scent, though in my opinion not green in any sense. So the name "Silvan" refers to a woody forest, not a green forest. The scent is very mild and restrained -- light incense, light pepper. Nothing to offend here, but nothing particularly new or striking. A good, basic scent. And some may not want anything more powerful, so for those I say check it out.

    09th April, 2015

    drseid's avatar

    United States United States

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    Tendre Poison by Christian Dior

    *This is a review of the vintage original formula.

    Tendre Poison goes on with a very fresh, light rosewood and effervescent citric bergamot orange before moving to its heart. As the composition enters its early heart the rosewood recedes as a dusty rose joins fresh, green freesia in support of the emerging tuberose that takes control of the composition with a dry honeyed undertone. During the late dry-down the honeyed tuberose vacates revealing the relatively dry vanilla and slightly animalic musky co-starring tandem with subtle, dry sandalwood and slightly lemony vetiver support through the finish. Projection is excellent to near outstanding and longevity excellent at over 12 hours on skin.

    I am sure everyone reading this is sick of my constant praise for the great Edouard Flechier, but prepare yourself for more of it here. I must sound like a broken record when I say over and over again that this guy is the most consistently good living perfumer, but vintage Tendre Poison proves his winning streak continues. Unlike so many flankers that capitalize on prior successful masterpieces, only to prove nothing like them (and frequently are awful smelling), there is a definite link here to Flechier's masterpiece, vintage Poison. That said, the perfumer has taken the great Poison fragrance foundation and changed it, making vintage Tendre Poison more light, fresh and green than the original while maintaining all of its charms. Some, (not I), felt that vintage Poison was just too heavy and powerful for easy wear... My guess is those folks should be giving this one a sniff to see if it solves their issues with the original. No, vintage Tendre Poison doesn't wimp out and turn into Poison-lite, instead it freshens the composition through quite deft use of green freesia and a much less dense dry honeyed tuberose than one might expect. The end result is still quite potent, but a lot easier to wear daily. Even the musky dry vanilla focused late dry-down works extremely well with its hints of lemony vetiver and sandalwood peeping through from time-to-time to give it a bit of an edge. The composition from top-to-bottom is absolutely incredible smelling, and while I still prefer the original vintage Poison by a hair, vintage Tendre Poison has proved its near-equal, and that is saying something. I think it is safe to say I believe both compositions are mandatory additions to one's collection. The bottom line is the sadly discontinued vintage Tendre Poison sells for about $115 per 100ml bottle on the aftermarket and is worth every penny and then-some, earning a "near-masterpiece" rating of 4.5 stars out of 5 and an extremely strong recommendation to all. Bravo Mr. Flechier!

    09th April, 2015

    alfarom's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Ducalis by Angela Ciampagna

    Ducalis is the typical iteration of oud westerner style that relies on sharp dry woods and spices. Think about a slightly less aggressive Montale and you're there. Cedarwood, synth-musky-leather, norlimbanol (or any other similar woodyamber) *adorned* by subtle florals such as a rosy pattern and maybe some geranium and with an overall aquatic vibe. If you like Montale's style or certain Nasomattos, you might dig this one but for me, Ducalis is way too late to the party.

    Potent, aggressive and extremely long lasting.

    Probably my least favorite in this otherwise fantastic range.

    09th April, 2015

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Electric Wood by Room 1015

    Another great composition from this surprisingly substantial new brand guys. Room 1015 is a dodgy (highly recommended) and "borderline" new olfactory project aesthetically embodied by its obscure founder, the mystic composer Dr Mike (musician and alchemical potions doctor at once). The initial Electric Wood's inebriating apparition is a wet explosion of angular citrus, misty iris, balmy-wet ambroxan, synthetic suede and soapy ("un-dry") sweet cedarwood (lacquered wood it seems from the descriptions). It seems to be dealing with the moody Dior Homme Parfum's cousin, slightly less chic, far less glamour but more lyric, enigmatic, woody and melodic. I feel a dark central suede/iris really spicy accord (nutmeg, cinnamon, saffron??) surrounded by woody and resinous-rubbery elements (probably hydrocarboresins and further). Immensely beautiful, immensely velvety (by soon an heady smooth rubber, mild powder and silky suede), immensely poetic as an obsessed wanderer of the metropolitan "liquid" night. It seems Dior Homme Parfum meets By Kilian Pure Oud in a sort of secret unmentionable visceral rendez-vous. All the elements seem combined in to a radically smooth chic amalgam, the woods are not heady, not so electric imo (apart along the first stage may be) but more properly velvety and powdery. I appreciate a lot the way in which we can experience on skin an aromatic combination of natural (the tribal deep soul of the Room 1015's people) and synthetical (the electronical/metallurgical dark side of the moon). Another juice for ghosts of the darkness.

    09th April, 2015

    Kain's avatar

    Iran Iran

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    A*Men Pure Wood by Thierry Mugler

    This is definitely something different from A*Men line. even though it does have a few elements from A*Men series but it's something different in my opinion.

    At the beginning I can smell a dry woody smell along with semi sweet and creamy vanilla and easy to detect caramel note. vanilla and caramel here are dry and only slightly sweet and they add just a delicious feeling to the scent!
    It's a dark and masculine scent for sure, but warm, sweet and sensual at the same time.

    In the mid I'm getting less woods and a little stronger creamy vanilla and caramel plus a sharp peppery note which is because of black pepper.

    In the base the smell is the same as mid but now pepper is almost gone and only thing that remains is a soft and very pleasing creamy woody smell that smell more like a creamy sandalwood to my nose.
    Quality of the notes is really good and you can detect and separate these notes easily.
    Projection is good (not great) and longevity is around 8 hours on the skin.
    I really like it!

    09th April, 2015

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Mood Indigo by Folie à Plusieurs

    Mood Indigo opens with a synthetic woody-peppery accord made thicker and “juicier” by green-floral notes and something slightly earthy-vegetable (pimento, I guess). Warmer, cozier sandalwood-incense-amber drydown, a bit more pleasant than the first stages. Several designer scents come to mind, pick any woody-peppery-amber scent somewhere between 2000 and today and mix it with anything from Comme des Garçon’s Incense series. Maybe just a tad sharper and more “minimalist” (i.e., plain) here. Buxton’s style at its best, where “Buxton’s style” means using the same three or four dry, cold synthetic woody-peppery-incense notes again, and again, and again. Anything the abovementioned Comme des Garçons or other “contemporary mainstream” brands could have accomplished 10 years ago, at a fraction of this price. Now, I admit I am really not the greatest fan of this kind of perfumes except for a few of them, so I may be particularly un-sensitive to this type of inspirations, but this really seems the epitome of boredom to me. It smells decent, but completely dull and mute. And kind of cheap too. An icy transparent blend which appears as interesting and charming as a cute, still kind of lame model whose career won’t probably go any further than posing for some Asos underwear pages.

    5/10

    09th April, 2015

    buyers_remorse's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Dunhill Edition by Dunhill

    Woodsy clean smell with citrus blast. With spiciness coming through with a hint of mint

    09th April, 2015

    jheppell's avatar



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    Rive Gauche pour Homme by Yves Saint Laurent

    It didn't take me long to fall in love with this. It's very masculine and so fresh and clean, yet at the same time creamy. This one is staying in my collection for a long time. Truly a superb scent.

    09th April, 2015

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Atramental by Room 1015

    An amazing and almost surreal composition is my first olfactory approach with this intriguing niche brand (a perfumed trip to be almost intended as an olfactory trait d'union between a darkly sinistral urban psychedelic dodgy rock/metal scene and an opposite, somewhat wild/tribal, olfactory-mental way of rural escape). Room 1015 Atramental combines a contemporary woody-aqueous minimalist urban sharp concept with an opposite almost tribal-sacramental resinous/leathery (and animalic) substance. This fragrance is finally and basically a really subtle and fluidy complex take on the leather theme (actually suderal or synthetic suede). The aroma starts with an hyper bizarre sort of opaque connection between silky suede, shadowy black pepper (really heady in this first stage), aqueous spices (plenty of cardamom a la Cartier Declaration), dry aqueous woods (Terre d'Hermes, 7 de Loewe and CdG Wonderwood and 2 man jump vaguely on mind) and "ideally" boozy mexican Mezcal (the genial mouldy landmark twist, an accord of saffron, cistus, synthetic suede and castoreum smelling about leather, mould, camphor, fur, woods, smoked rubber, dried caddis and frankincense). The final outcome is a "conceptual" metallurgical dry-misty suede accord extremely opaque (in black and white) metropolitan and piquant. This dry down is all about dusty-resinous (fir resins/frankincense/cistus) animalic "camoscio". I recommend this fragrance to all those struggling spirits (musical ghosts) of the metropolitan night waving between treacherous delirium, post-modern romanticism and exploration of the consciousness's fields. Big thumbs up.

    09th April, 2015

    alfarom's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Liquo by Angela Ciampagna

    Here's another (big) hit. Definitely on the darker side of the spectrum if compared to other deliveries from the same house, Liquo is a vibrating mix of dark salty licorice, anise and hay. Something that immediately made me think about artisanal italian licorice-based liquors / amari. The hay note is remarkable from the very early stages but it gets more dominant as the fragrance evolves towards the drydown during which it's joined by a moderately sweet and dry woody-tonka base with incensey undertones. Moody and kind of blue too but comfortingly so.

    Again, the rustic and the modern paired together, a rural villa renovated with modern finishings, it's the goth represented in full colors as opposed to just black, it's a fragrance aimed at smelling good and modern by skipping relying on *weird* notes and / or aromachemicals. As with most others Ciampagnas, fantastic presence and great longevity.

    Kudos.


    09th April, 2015

    rbaker's avatar



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    1725 Casanova by Histoires de Parfums

    The opening is a fresh blend of lemon, grapefruit and bergamot, followed by a lavender-centred drydown. Then a vanilla emerges that appears a bit too generic on my skin. The base changes into a wood-based impression, mainly consisting of sandalwood and cedar, again a tad dull.

    On my skin the performance is not great; sillage and projection are moderate and longevity five hours. 2.5/5

    09th April, 2015

    silverbullet's avatar

    United States United States

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    1861 by Xerjoff

    As you all know by now my reviews are not as wordy as I'd like them to be :)

    This is my first Xerjoff and am pleased to say that from top to base this fragrance is over the top. I not sure if anyone really has a signature scent, but this could well be one of mine.

    Superb!!

    09th April, 2015

    alfarom's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Nox by Angela Ciampagna

    Another aspect that's immediately noticeable while exploring this line, it's its diversity. Ciampagna's offerings cover several themes in perfumery and all of them with a very personal quote and style. Nox is what I would probably describe as a woody aromatic that relies on an original mix of notes.

    There's the hinoki's kind of cypress / dark green quality as the main player and it's paired to an ozonic mix of genderless white florals, other astringent / pungent green notes and a remarkable salty vibe (which is present in several other fragrances from this house). Other smooth woods and clean musky notes serve as a base. The overall result is pretty original and charming if not a tad *bizarre*. A light / transparent woody thing with a remarkably modern twist. Could easily be an hypothetical love child between an Hermessence and a Comme Des Garcons but with that certain italian / meditterranean je ne sais quoi which is typical of this firm.

    Nice but not amongst my favorites.

    09th April, 2015

    Wild Gardener's avatar

    France France

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    Balafre by Lancôme

    After an indecisive opening of soapy aromatics, coumarinic sweet, and sour wood perked up by a dash of resin, Balafré settles on a vaguely rustic sort of fougere style with a natural-porous texture.

    My sample is described as Aftershave on the box, and just in case there remains any doubt about who should wear it, underneath it says For Men. Being released in 1967 when the gender bending flower power movement was in full swing, Lancôme evidently wanted its male customers to feel no shame or embarrassment about wearing perfume/cologne/aftershave, even one that by todays standards seems a perfectly innocuous masculine in the barbershop tradition.

    Coming from a time of political tension between various Radical movements and 'the Man' who represented the establishment, perfume seemingly got caught between a demand by the young for less rigid social structures - and more flowers, and the desire of the producers to avoid alienating conventional male customers with anything less than Manly fragrances.

    The outcome was a compromise. Both Balafré and its exact contemporary Hai Karate with its violent misogynistic advertising, were neither testosterone fueled chest beaters nor perfumey floral affairs, but in the case of HK apparently a 'soft' barbershop style thing. Balafré - the name means Scarface in French, was despite its aggressive image also quite bland.

    The usual repertoire of typically male notes are claimed to be present: spice, wood, resins, green herbs, oakmoss and leather, but the leather effect is barely there and only resin and moss make any definite impact on the soapy barbershop motif. In fact, rather than being in your face, its quite shy and a bit confused and instead seems to want to slope off to the woods and find its Inner Man, which it does after two or three hours...

    Interesting only as a period piece.

    09th April, 2015

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Rosarium by Angela Ciampagna

    Rosarium is a balsamic incense-based scent (as the name suggests, with its “liturgical” reference) with overall a bit more complexity and color than many other niche incense scents; there’s a sweet-powdery floral accord comprising a hint of honey (quite dry and really subtle), jasmine and a dusty-buttery note of iris and carrot, and a nice, quite natural and almost raw woody base where you get both cedar (I mean “real” cedar) and vetiver. While many niche incenses smell quite synthetic, this one plays actually the “natural” card; incense itself is surely a bit artificial but here it’s surrounded by a really pleasant and compelling frame of earthy “nature” – carrot, flowers, woods, honey. All crafted in a quite subtle way, to keep incense as the main note. Somehow dusty, somehow gentle (flowers, powder), and overall much quiet, meditative, kind of gloomy as you would expect given the notes – but not overly dark, just more “churchy” with a feel of archaic rawness. Like the rest of this line, this scent as well evokes an intriguing feel of “Mediterranean gothic” which I find quite compelling and well played here as well. It’s still basically and incense scent and personally I am more than tired of this family, so don’t expect anything groundbreaking; but still, this is really nice..

    7-7,5/10

    09th April, 2015

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Hatria by Angela Ciampagna

    Hatria opens with a really compelling and thick rose-oud combo which smells finally slightly different from the usual clichés of these notes, so don’t think of Montale rose-ouds or similar stuff. Of course that’s the family, but Ciampagna made some efforts to do it in a slightly more personal way. It’s dark, classy and “juicy” as one may expect, but has also a salty, balsamic-herbal quality which definitely brings the blend closer to a Mediterreanean inspiration – something more unusual for such notes in my opinion. The notes are quite simple to get, they smell quality to me and are perfectly blended: rose, herbs, oud, a balmy-ambery sweet base accord with a great sandalwood note, and an overall warm breeze echoing vintage fougères (cloves, patchouli, musk...). The “caramel” note, luckily I almost don’t get it; more than an individual note, I think “caramel” here (whatever they used to build that) provides just a sort of dark, warm, slightly sticky thickness that perfectly gives “weight” to the composition. Another note which I don’t get is saffron, although I do feel a sort of dusty, spicy, “culinary” and Mediterranean feel. Most of all anyway Hatria is about rose, oud, patchouli, sweet-balsamic warmth. A sure “yes” for me overall: it smells deep and quality, and the composition – which is quite linear, though – is crafted in a way that it conveys a fascinating feel of warm abandon as you may experience in a sleepy desolated village in the deep South of Italy – kind of dusty, sweet, earthy, with a balmy feel of “suspension”. Lights and shades. Refined but with a nice “rural” feel.

    7,5-8/10

    09th April, 2015

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Ducalis by Angela Ciampagna

    As the rest of Ciampagna’s line, which is starting to look like one of the nicest surprises of 2015 so far for me, the “visual” inspiration and the ambiance are quite clear since the very first sniff: a sort of dark, provincial “austerity” somehow sitting between a feel of desolation and a raw, archaic, vibrant naturality. In “olfactive” language: dryness, thickness, earthiness, a palpable “artisanal” feel, an overall dark and meditative mood, but at the same a peaceful sense of quiet thanks to balsamic and aromatic spicy-herbal-floral notes - I guess evoking the “soothing power” of nature. Ducalis is particularly, elegantly dark and dry at first, yet with a warm heart, mostly focusing on a thick woody-floral blend with dark shades and spicy hints; as minutes pass though, it progressively unravels its beautifully intricate texture, which is quite more than you would expect at first. Sweet, velvety, slightly metallic flowers on warm, balmy but also dry and really austere woods: two main “axes” each comprising several facets that you get throughout the evolution. Flowers range to the threatening obscurity of rose and jasmine, to “whiter shades” of lily and cyclamen; the same for woods, which comprise nuances ranging from sandalwood (“juicy”, sweet, bright and cozy) to drier, shadier and “woodier” notes of rosewood and cedar, with some added weight thanks to cloves, leather, and nutmeg. A touch of amber and vanilla provide some sweet and warm “roundness”. Overall Ducalis may appeal fans of oud scents as well, as it shows some similar sort of “dark silky thickness”, just more complex and aromatic – not due to a single note (but indeed, woods, jasmine, nutmeg and leather do create a similar aroma). On the other hand, flowers are worked in a really peculiar way here, which kind of just uses “some” nuances of them; so despite you see many of them listed in the composition, I wouldn’t define this a “floral scent” – rather a woody scent with many interesting and complex nuances, this including flowers. Artisanal to the bone, totally fascinating and sophisticated but at the same time kind of raw and dark. Utterly enjoyable. Bravi!

    8/10

    09th April, 2015

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Liquo by Angela Ciampagna

    Holy grail stuff for any licorice-hay lover. Liquo opens with an extremely vibrant, realistic, darkish smell of licorice sticks, wet hay under a cloudy sky (think of the hay note in Heeley’s Cuir Pleine Fleur... just in 3-D full power), anise, a ton of dusty and sharp cumin, woody notes, with a gentle touch of lavender and powdery flowers. Mediterranean to the bone, a thick blend transporting you right into a small village’s fair, blending the smell of home-made, non-sweet – rather salty on the contrary – licorice and anise candies with earthy whiffs of barn smells from farms and fields – hay, woods, herbs. That’s it, and it’s terribly good for me. The notes smell raw and realistic, but the blend is extremely refined, crisp, “polished” in a good way; so don’t expect anything overly “hippie and artisanal”. It surely smells natural and almost organic to some extent, and surely shows an artisanal touch – especially that fantastic note of hay – but overall it’s all tamed down and mastered enough to appear as a proper work of high class perfumery. A win-win compromise, shortly: wild and sophisticated. Also, don’t expect any gourmand scent: too earthy and realistic for that. Quite dark too, or better say with a palpable sort of “rainy” feel... ever been to the countryside after a storm? That’s the smell. Peaceful, but almost unsettling, with a soothing, drier and dusty-smoky drydown. A velvety somber perfume managing to smell extremely elegant and enjoyable yet “uncivilised” and moody, with some “gothic” vibe underneath – a “rural” kind of gothic deeply rooted in the elusive quiet of the Mediterranean countryside. Great materials as far as I can tell. Solid and evocative.

    8,5/10

    09th April, 2015

    alfarom's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Rosarium by Angela Ciampagna

    Rosarium is probably my favorite release in this utterly compelling range. A smooth and highly comforting take on liturgical incense. There's something very familiar about this fragrance and yet, somehow, while bringing to mind of other similarly themed fragrances, there's still something incredibly unique about it.

    The incense is clean, waxy, white and with a crystal quality. It feels fragile in its beauty but never ephemeral. There's a sense of detachment that pervades Rosarium throughout its evolution but it's juxtaposed to something warm and comforting. In this context, it reminded me of L'Orpheline by Serge Lutens. Mind me though, the two are pretty different in smell but they share the same fragrance profile. Several shades of gray (I promise less than fifty) with a lilac dye thrown in the palette. They're both aloof and affable at the same time but while the Lutens feels somewhat like a Comme Des Garcons wannabe, the Ciampagna takes the rural / rustic route. There's the violet-incense combo of Maria Candida Gentile's Exultat, something to enhance the general grayness probably provided by the iris-cedarwood duo (Carthusia 1681) while the waxy incense give a remarkable sense of cleanliness.

    The drydown is all about a super warm and enveloping vanillic-woody-incense base with vetiver keeping the general powderyness / sweetness perfectly in check. Cedarwood is never overdone so that the fragrance can keep a well rounded structure from top to bottom. As most others *Ciampagnas*, Rosarium is incredibly easy to like while being slightly twisted to preserve its subtle but very defined identity. Fantastic presence and extraordinary longevity.

    Well refined, easy to wear and completely addictive. A winner.


    09th April, 2015

    Kain's avatar

    Iran Iran

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    Sahara Noir by Tom Ford

    Whoever put this in women section was either stoned or drunk in the moment! this is definitely masculine.

    At the beginning I can smell a heavy resinous and spicy churchy frankincense with some woods and very dry ambery scent right beside it.
    After testing this I was completely shocked! I just looked at the bottle again to make sure if I'm testing from the right bottle!
    Yep, it says for women but there is no way a women wear something like this!
    The opening is a very dry, very bitter and heavy in resinous part type of scent and with adding some frankincense you have a completely masculine scent and one of those heavy and challenging ones! not one of these fluffy and safe men fragrances that we can see nowadays!

    As time passes scent is almost the same, only get smoother and slightly sweet plus some dry fruity notes in the background.
    Do not expect a warm and very sweet amber/vanilla type of scent from this. only dry resinous and spicy/woody frankincense all the way through.
    As a man I loved it but for women even man out there ..... do not blind buy this!!!!
    Projection is strong and longevity can pass 10 hours easily!

    09th April, 2015

    ucmaso's avatar



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    Eros by Versace

    If this was a song, Nick Jonas would be singing it. It's not challenging, it's not complex, it's extremely sweet, and it seems like teenage girls would like it. It's not a work of art but if you're looking for a loud, "clubby" scent this is a strong contender. I compared this to Spicebomb, 1 Million, and Pure Malt and chose this.

    09th April, 2015

    RickyDot's avatar



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    Insurrection II Pure by Reyane

    The difference between the initial application of Insurrection II Pure and Creed Aventus is somewhat striking. You can tell that Aventus is a higher quality fragrance, it is smooth and pleasant and slightly warm and smokey. Pure is colder, more metallic and the alcohol scent is somewhat strong.

    The beauty of Pure is entirely after it dries down and the several hours that follow. That's when you cannot tell the difference between Pure and Aventus at all. Is the projection there with Pure? Yes, and for several hours, too. When I left work 4.5 hours after spraying on Pure, I could smell it radiating off my skin as I got into my car and walked to the restaurant to get food, and then on the way back as I was getting out of my car walking back to the office five and a half hours later, it was still there, going pretty strong!

    So yes, you can tell right away that Aventus is a higher quality fragrance--it's not cloying and it doesn't feel rough and cold in your nose the way Pure can--but after a while, you will not notice and you will not care, and you will smell like you're wearing a two-hundred dollar fragrance. Except you paid a tenth of that.

    By the way, there is no such thing as "Insurrection Pure". The name of this should be displayed as "Insurrection II Pure" because that's what it is. Insurrection II is a line of fragrances, with Pure and Wild being different fragrances on that line. Hope this clears that up.

    Enjoy, my friends!

    Scent: 10
    Projection: 8
    Longevity: 7
    Saving $180: $180

    09th April, 2015

    JDaggett's avatar

    United States United States

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    Altitude by Swiss Army

    I've had a 20% full bottle kicking around since long before I recently got into frags. I dimly recall that it must have been something I snagged from a buddy who was moving, along with half a bottle of apple cider vinegar, leftover spices, partial bags of pasta, and other treasures from the giveaway box.

    I've not really worn it in the years since, only using it to occasionally spritz my closet. It never really smelled good to me, but I did not have a way to articulate or evaluate that. I never had anything to compare it to until getting into frags as a hobby several months ago.

    Now that I have a bit more of a nose, I can say that this is a dud. Smells to me very much like the $1.99 Suave For Men Active Sport body wash I kept in the shower at my old job, drying down to a more sophisticated Irish Spring note over time. I've literally spent more than 1000 nights of my life in the wilderness and summitted several dozen peaks, and this does not evoke any of that for me.

    On the plus side, it does project, and the bottle is pretty cool.

    09th April, 2015

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