Latest Fragrance Reviews, Updated Daily

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    Francolino's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Tom Ford Noir by Tom Ford

    disappointing, low sillage and low duration.. Armani Eau de la Nuit revisited!

    13 August, 2014

    ClaireV's avatar

    Ireland Ireland

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    White Flowers by Creed

    This is beautiful and very natural-smelling. The opening is a crisp slice of green apple dropped into lemon water, followed quickly by a heart of white jasmine petals. The jasmine here is pure and non-indolic, a daytime version of jasmine rather than the night-flowering, sultry stuff. For a while, the central accord feels fresh and almost waxy in texture. It is so realistic that you can almost visualize the creamy white jasmine blossoms surrounded by their green, waxy leaves. The waxy feel fades off, revealing a more bog-standard jasmine accord (more lush than before), but it's still all very nice. The dry down is a white, inoffensive musk. It's a lovely perfume. Nothing exceptional, mind you, and certainly not original. But for a fresh, natural-smelling, feminine jasmine for the daytime hours, I guess this can't be beat.

    I have only smelled a few Creed perfumes - this, Virgin Island Water, and Jardins d'Amalfi - but all of them have had this signature running through them that I feel I could recognize if I were to smell one blind. I would categorize this signature as very fresh, watery, and natural-smelling, but also rather simple, linear, and weak in terms of projection and longevity. But I can definitely see the appeal of Creed to a large segment of the population (general population, as well as the fragrance community) - they smell classy, they are quite delicate and beautiful, and above all, they are safe rather than challenging.

    13 August, 2014

    ClaireV's avatar

    Ireland Ireland

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    Mazzolari Lui by Mazzolari

    Mazzolari Lui is crazy sexy good. Yes, ok, technically it’s a men’s perfume (“Lui” means “Him” in Italian) and if you read the often hilarious reviews for this here on Basenotes and on Fragrantica, you will see an awful lot of male reviewers using words such as “virile”, “masculine” and “testosterone” which is akin to putting up big, neon signs reading, “Wimmen Folk Turn Back Now!” and pissing around it to demarcate the territory.

    One review in particular here on Basenotes had me ordering a sample Mazzolari Lui straight away. Written by a guy called Montagne, it opens with possibly the best first sentence ever written about a perfume:

    “Jesus, Dad”, gasps my daughter, hoarsely. “You smell like a bum’s nut-sack,” adding, perhaps superfluously: “and not in a good way.”

    Oh Montagne, whoever you are, you had me at “nut-sack”. After all, all of the perfumes I love the best, such as Parfumerie Generale’s L’Ombre Fauve, Maison Francis Kurkdjian’s Absolue Pour Le Soir, and Serge Lutens’ Muscs Khoublai Khan, have (mostly) men writing reviews about them that reference:

    a. the smell of a man’s sweaty nether regions, pee, poo, testicles, and/or;

    b. the fact they would absolutely not, under any circumstances, like to smell this on a woman.

    For me personally, that is just like waving a red flag in front of a bull. Half the stuff I do is on a dare already, so why should perfume be any different? It makes me wonder though – what is it about these big musky, castoreum-laden fumes that indicate they are for men only? And while we are on the subject, was there a board meeting back in biblical times that decided that violets and primroses were not to be worn by men? It’s not a facetious question. I would actually like to know.

    Me, I try not to limit myself by all these (seemingly rather arbitrary) gender classifications. I love and wear Dior Homme Intense, Hermes Bel Ami, and Caron’s Le Troisieme Homme. I have worn Bvlgari Black since I was a teenager, even though every time I have gone to pick it up in the shop, a saleslady with a panicked look on her face would rush over and say, “MODOM! That is a MAN’s perfume!” I also used to wear Lalique’s Encre Noir, until the Iso E Super in it started to give me headaches.

    But back to the matter at hand: does Mazzolari’s Lui actually smell like a bum’s nut-sack or not? Well, it’s been a while since I’ve smelled one*, but no – no it does not. It is much nicer. It is a fantastically dirty leather-and-patchouli fragrance that makes you feel like you are rolling around with someone you shouldn't be on a fur coat that has been rubbed down with civet oil. The opening blast is ferocious and pungent, with a smell half way between the sourness of clothes folded away damp and sweaty horse leather. The civet makes it utterly filthy from beginning to end, but despite the predictably massive longevity, the sillage does a surprising dip down to a skin scent after the initial blast. The castoreum in the base gives it a rounded, sensual feel.

    It’s really hot. I mean, it is hella sexy. It is an Austen Powers sort of perfume. It reminds me most of L’Ombre Fauve, with its furry animal sensuality, but Mazzolari’s Lui is far more patch-heavy, dense and unctuous. And whereas L’Ombre Fauve is really just a riff on the dirty parts of amber, musk, and patchouli all joined up at the seams, Lui is a far messier, wilder thing altogether – an explosive cocktail of the unstable elements of pissy leather and patchouli and civet. Everything here is quite rough and disjointed. But in a good way.

    I would highly recommend this one to the ladies out there who love a nice bit of skank. Any woman who appreciates the filthiness of Jean Desprez’ Bal a Versailles, MFK’s Absolue Pour Le Soir, Masque Fragrance’s Montecristo, or even the cute, furry little L’Ombre Fauve would get a kick out of this. Ignore all the “for men only” signs posted all around the Internet. If you are the kind of woman who wears perfumes to please herself alone, and not men, then this one is really worth looking into. I find it an intoxicating, almost fiercely private pleasure. I wear it for myself alone. I have worn it for the past five nights running, and one whole weekend, and as someone who has hundreds of samples I really want to try, that surely says a lot.

    *It was a cold night outside Termini bus station in Rome. Woke up to find a vagrant gently grinding his crotch into my face. It was a mercifully brief encounter but I did get a tantalizing whiff of what Montagne’s daughter seems to have experienced in full.

    13 August, 2014

    stephend's avatar



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    L'Air du Desert Marocain by Tauer

    One of my very favourite fragrances. I swoon with the cedar on the dry down. It stays with me all day and more. It's very hard to find a fragrance that lasts so long. What does Mr Tauer add? Same goes for Lonestar Memories.
    I like Lonestar Memories but it's a more difficult fragrance. I can't just wear it anywhere. Whereas L'air du desert is a sumptuous friend that I don't worry about inflicting on others.

    13 August, 2014

    Casiquire's avatar



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    Invasion Barbare / SB by MDCI

    WOW. This may just be my favorite scent so far. The top notes didn't really impress me and I wasn't expecting much out of the bottle, but about an hour later I sniffed my wrist and was just intoxicated. I agree that the name is misleading, it's not dirty or barbaric, but it is as delicious as a clean smell can get. It's sweet but still masculine, and it smells refined but rather young to my nose. Maybe I'm wrong about that, it's just my opinion. I just see young guys (like myself) with a lot of money (unlike myself) wearing this and feeling all cocky, yet the smell is good enough to be a work of art as far as I'm concerned. Add to that the fact that eleven hours after applying it was time for me to shower and the smell was still going--though of course it was a bit close by that time, but it was still wafting from my clothing. My skin does tend to hold scents for a pretty long time but this was something else, it would have lasted several more hours if I didn't have to shower. Just amazing, wish there were more buying options at lower prices but sometimes you have to pay for the good stuff.

    13 August, 2014

    Casiquire's avatar



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    Jicky by Guerlain

    I really wanted to like this one, but something was just off for me. There is a note in here similar to anise, and I wish it was smoothed out by the lavender but it actually ends up making the lavender itself smell sharp and spicy. Odd considering there's only one other review even mentioning anise, but I strongly agree with that one--all I smell is spicy anise and tonka. It lasts a nice long while on my skin but I didn't get any of that creamy lemon I read about or any of the woodiness. I didn't notice the civet right at first at all but it did come out a tiny bit later in the day and it was very intriguing but unfortunately it didn't really improve the smell itself. I do appreciate this smell for what it is, though! And I have a laugh reading how many people call this a "simple" smell, and then proceed to give a description that's COMPLETELY DIFFERENT from everyone else's description. Clearly this is a smell that's heavily dependent on the formulation and the specific skin type and fluctuates wildly. I like that in a smell! And I like the quality too. It's just not the smell for me.

    13 August, 2014

    deadidol's avatar



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    Calling All Angels by April Aromatics

    Calling All Angels is a huge scent; a massive, sticky labdanum that takes Norma Kamali’s classic Incense and doctors it up with chewy honey-vanilla.

    So many all-natural perfumes suffer from serious commitment issues, oftentimes doing a runner within thirty minutes or so. But with Calling All Angels, it’s the wearer who needs to prepare him or herself for a marathon as this scent goes on big and stays that way for 12+ hours. It’s totally dominating, and takes some forethought and planning to wear.

    You get it all upfront: the smoldering Kamali-esque labdanum and myrrh alongside sticky gourmand notes that don’t read as sweet, per se, but certainly read as edible and chewy. These are flanked by sappy woods and elemi, and just a hint of bitterness sneaks through from the rose to render the overall effect as a wall of thick, goopy resins. It almost feels as if there’s a syrupy layer on your skin.

    After ten minutes or so, things turn down a notch and the scent settles into an impeccably balanced and fairly dry incense elegantly merged with honeyed notes to produce something that is perhaps best described as “toasted”—like a gourmet dessert that leans more savory than sweet. It’s relatively smoky, and there’s an unmistakable dispute between the gritty resins and the sweet notes. For the most part, this phase stays the same throughout the scent’s lifespan: resinous and sappy, a marginally dirty quasi-gourmand.

    I can’t state it more strongly: this is an exceptionally dense fragrance. It’s not cloying per se, but if any angels were to get some of this on their wings, you can guarantee that their aeronautic ability would be compromised and things would turn a bit Icarus. Although I tend to prefer my incense more liturgical, this is an impressive affair—and the fragrance that April Aromatics seems to be most known for these days. But just be warned: it’s a much darker scent than you might expect from a line that seems to embrace all things light and airy. It’s not as punishing as Norma Kamali, but it’s not exactly seraphic innocence either.

    13 August, 2014

    deadidol's avatar



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    Rosenlust by April Aromatics

    Not as massive a rose as you might expect, but one that’s all business from the get-go. The orris-ish base acts as a cushion, and it keeps the rose from being excessively powerful. This is more about soft petals than sour stems as much of the acidity than accompanies the “green” ottos has been tamed. There’s a touch of bitterness to keep things real, as it were, and that slight minty effect that’s detectable in geranium is also present, but both aspects are coddled by the balsamic influence of the base.

    I find it challenging to evaluate rose in perfume as it’s a note that I dislike and tend to steer away from. But I could say with some confidence that this isn’t a “drunk rose” fragrance, nor is it a particularly narcotic one either. It’s not dark, nor is it melodramatic. It’s not really blended with anything that steps on its toes, but it does feel spiced and sweetened. Uncomplicated and direct; warm and soft; there’s really very else little going on with this one—which to me, nudges it a bit closer to my own personal idea of hell. But for those looking for a soliflor rose that doesn’t mess around and is made from top-shelf ingredients, you’d be hard-pressed to outdo this one. Unfussy and honest is probably the best way I can describe it.

    13 August, 2014

    RC.'s avatar



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    L'Air du Desert Marocain by Tauer

    Love it. Stings your nose with a sharp smokiness that lasts a long time. I feel like a badass when I step out at night wearing it. Pair it with something a little edgy, stylish, even bohemian from your wardrobe and you're ready for the kill. Department store aquatics don't even stand a chance.

    13 August, 2014

    rbaker's avatar



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    Pear + Olive by Slumberhouse

    A delightful pear opening with a mildly boozy touch makes a fine start. Later, in the drydown, a delightfully gentle chamomile develops with hints of olive - the latter being an ephemeral background note on my skin in spite of its prominent position in the name. Floral elements, especially geranium, are another feature at this stage. He base sees the arrival of creamy woodsy impression, with hints of sandal. In spite its creaminess is is quite restrained. Adequate sillage, decent projection and very good longevity of seven hours - for warm spring days.

    13 August, 2014

    badnaam's avatar



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    Cerruti Image Harmony by Cerruti

    Very light and sophisticated smelling. Soothing and fresh at the same time. Not generic and synthetic in any sense, very good quality. Would be good for summer, spring or even fall. Average longevity and projection, however, for the price you can do a lot lot worse.

    13 August, 2014

    jumpfrog's avatar



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    Bel Ami by Hermès

    I don't get all the positive reviews on this one. My wrist smells so oily/plasticky . Its so cloying too.

    13 August, 2014

    tempest moon's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Tabac Blond by Caron

    Words fail me...

    What an incredible masterpiece this is! Like gold or pearl necklaces, and dresses made from finest black velvet. This is a perfume which has to be not smelled but rather experienced!

    Tabac Blond (I'm reviewing the Eau de Parfum here) was released in 1919 (same time as the legendary Mitsouko by Guerlain) as a perfume for women who smoked! It was a revolutionary concept, and also a revolutionary perfume in many ways because firstly, it was the first time that leather had been used in a woman's perfume and secondly, this was one of the very first tobacco fragrances! I think it's more revolutionary than Mitsouko though.

    It's a hard one to explain but I'll try to. What you get is dry, soft tobacco, like the paper which lines a pack of cigarettes, rather than the cigarettes themselves. Spicy carnation dominates, along with a gorgeous leather-iris combination and a hint of animalic notes. Damp cedarwood and dry, dark vanilla mixed with creamy ylang-ylang complete the base.

    This is unlike anything I've tried in a very long time. When I smell this I get two images, elegant balls and women dressed in black with white gloves and cigarette holders, marble floored ball rooms and the golden aura from crystal chandeliers. The other image I get is the women of the 1920's, androgynous women (this was reportedly a favourite of Marlene Dietrich). I don't get "flapper" or "loose woman" out of this. I get "rich woman who smokes"... and yes it's a lot like the smell of makeup and tobacco but at the same time is so deep and luxurious that it really deserves a few tries to really see the elegance in it. It really gives of an aura of gold and black and luxury. I can't explain any better than that. If you can, please try and experience this. A legendary perfume.

    12 August, 2014

    Colin Maillard's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Rêve Opulent by Terry de Gunzburg

    Reve Opulent opens with a nice, fresh, zesty floral bouquet with crunchy green notes and some slight hints of candied-floral notes (like lentiscus), and a fruity accord which I thought was on the tropical side but I read it is a bit more "traditionally" plummy and peachy. Finally some Mediterranean vibe all over, I guess due do a herbal-spicy accord. Nice, clean, slightly soapy in a lively, spring-y way, less deep and interesting than it may appear, mostly because of an overall synthetic feel which brings it sadly closer to several designer fruity-floral scents. However, it is not that bad, proudly showing its botanical, graceful, lively and romantically refined personality. A bit boring, but it works.

    6,5/10

    12 August, 2014

    Darvant's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    Mahon Leather by Floris

    Floris Mahon Leather is one of the most distinguished soapy leather chypre I've experienced in my humble passionate career, so enjoyable in its extremely balanced, softly floral and discreetly barber-shop temperament. The leather touch is in here utterly Royal, gentle and neutral in its "Victorian" link with patchouli, laundry soap (musk/labdanum-balmy amber-powder-tonka-honey) and soft floral notes. I detect an hallmarking evanescent soap-like jasmine in the leathery balminess while iris, dry vetiver and saffron provide a general powdery dry fresh radiancy. A traditional hesperides/patchouli/soap/vetiver accord provides that sort of classic Etro-like aristocratic undertone. There is something warm and organic perfectly merged with the skin organic warmth. The final amalgam is a heavenly caress lingering on your skin as an otherworldly organic potion for hours. You can easily detect (especially in the first part of development) points in common with the more renowned Creed Royal English Leather (soapy leather, somewhat spicy-liquorous honey, oakmoss, hesperides, patchouli end more) but while the Creed's one is more stout, more properly leathery and laundry-honeyed-mossy Mahon Leather smells finally more ethereal, powdery floral, "ghostly", sophisticated and subtle. A wonderful example of measured and graceful traditional english class.
    P.S= Along the dry down's "long tail" the note of vetiver (an almost aqueous soft un-rooty vetiver) jumps on the stage with all its charge of fresh boise typical fluidity.

    12 August, 2014

    Captain's avatar

    Canada Canada

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    Sexy Amber by Michael Kors

    lol wut? I'll never understand some reviews. I've been chilling on reviewing here lately but after reading these dismissals I have to say, this is gorgeous. Like a much longer lasting Prada L'eau Ambree. It's more warm, less soapy and sooo long lasting. I wore it yesterday, haven't showered yet today and it's still quite noticeable - I love the longevity which is going on 12 hours now.

    As for the scent, it's a salty and slightly sweet amber, not that spicy concoction some ambers consist of. Slightly resinous, salty with an airy sandalwood dry down. It smells, quite frankly, like me only better.

    12 August, 2014

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

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    Inouï by Shiseido

    This is very green, but also a bit acidic (thyme and juniper) or medicinal, as Barbara Herman describes it. Pine lightens it as does the jasmine.

    I was not won over by Inoui, finding it interesting in its fruit/floral/herbal combination, but not memorable and not really that significant as a scent in and of itself.

    One experiences more the chemical than the natural in the ingredients.

    Not awful, but not good.

    12 August, 2014

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    Pulpería by Fueguia

    Fruity woody scent with a lot of character. The fruit is strong but unfamiliar, something like blackcurrant. The wood is also strong, cedar-amber, and dominates the base. I'd have preferred a greater reliance on natural cedarwood oil, but the overall effect is harmonious.

    12 August, 2014

    Francolino's avatar

    Italy Italy

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    New West for Him by Aramis

    a Californian summer afternoon riding on a highway!

    12 August, 2014

    ClaireV's avatar

    Ireland Ireland

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    Fendi (original) by Fendi

    This came to my attention via a recent Basenotes article on the top ten discontinued fragrances for women. And of course, mention the words "discontinued" and "difficult to find" and I am off like a greyhound after a plastic bunny. After plonking down $10 for a mini on eBay, I sat back and awaited my prize with quite a bit of smugness at having secured such a rare prize. Well, turns out the only rare prize here is me, as in "prize idiot".

    Fendi is basically Coco with a bit of Italian flava thrown in. It is a rich, spicy floriental with a confusing array of sweet and bitter spices, and a well-trodden sandalwood and leather base. As with Coco, everything feels very crowded in, overly rich and perfumey. Worse of all, you can totally smell the 80s on this. It smells big and lacquered, like something one of those girls in the Addicted to Love video would wear, all scary red lips, clickety clackety high heels, and slicked back hair.

    Fendi is seductive alright, but putting it on is more like a terrifying statement of intent, as in "I am going to bed you tonight, young man, whether you like it or not" rather than a genuine, natural sexiness. I am sure that the women who love this see it as a romantic memento mori of what you leave your (toyboy) lover in the morning, sheets all tossed up and smeared with lipstick, expensive black underwear strewn across the floor, and all.....but all I can hear when I wear this is the slurp of naked buttock sliding off the bucket seat at the bar as a forty-something cougar in a leopard print mini skirt lurches towards a group of terrified but horny teenage boys in the corner. I say this not to mock, but to convey the sense of anxiety that wearing Fendi gives me - anxiety that I could some day BE this woman if I ever leave my husband and have to enter the dating scene again. The thought terrifies the bejesus out of me, and so does Fendi.

    12 August, 2014

    JackTwist's avatar

    United States United States

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    Fête by Molyneux

    Barbara Herman correctly describes this as a "fruity animalic chypre." Bringing together the sweetness of plum and peach and balancing it with the animalic trio of civet, cumin and leather, this becomes a come hither, but no further, scent that is both sophisticated and naughty at the same time, giving off sweetness, but promising a meeting in the hayfield later.

    Top notes: Caraway, Plum, Peach, Bergamot, Rosewood, Cumin
    Heart notes: Lilac, Orris, Jasmine, Ylang
    Base notes: Sandalwood, Benzoin, Vanilla, Oakmoss, Civet, Leather

    This is a unique and lovely scent. The bottle is a gorgeous and delicate tower. A great shame that something this fine is discontinued.

    12 August, 2014

    ClaireV's avatar

    Ireland Ireland

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    Cuir Fétiche by Maître Parfumeur et Gantier

    A wonderful surprise! It deserves more attention than the massive shrug it seems to have gotten around the Internet. It's a floral leather in the vein of Chanel's Cuir de Russie and Cuir de Lancome, but is far heavier on the birch tar than either of these, and therefore considerably smokier. The leather is also a little bit more butch, with the opening reminding me strongly of the cracked leather in Bandit. But this is a brief impression - as the scent progresses, the leather becomes this soft, supple handbag leather.

    What's important to mention here is that Cuir Fetiche, while not filthy, is not exactly the clean, sanitized thing reviewers seem to paint it as either. In fact, it contains a good deal of properly dirty animal pong. The dirtiness is coming from a powerful musk that runs up from behind the opening leather note, and totally dominates it from that point onwards.

    There is also quite a bit of filthiness coming from the florals, which, surprisingly for me, I can smell very, very distinctly as a very indolic jasmine and a fabulously fleshy ylang. Usually in these floral leathers, I can pick up a fuzzy outline of florals but can't really distinguish separate flowers in the mix - here I can. The florals are in clear focus here. Although I am not a big floral lover, the floral accords here are extremely enjoyable. The jasmine in particular smells like it is decaying straight off the vine and into my lap. The indoles in the jasmine act as a sort of bridge to the dirtiness of the musk, enclosing the leather accord in an aura of naughty naughty.

    I really like this one. It's probably a bit redundant in my fragrance wardrobe because I already own more Cuir de Russie than I could possibly use in a lifetime, as well as a bottle of Cuir de Lancome, and a decant of Cuir Pleine Fleur. But I do think it brings something new to the table - first of all, I am not sure I have seen a leather that derives its animalic pong from a dirty musk before, and I am pretty sure that I have never seen a leather accentuated with such delineated and realistic florals either. It smells both natural and naturalistic. Definitely worth considering if you are into the leather genre in particular, and easily unisex.

    12 August, 2014

    ClaireV's avatar

    Ireland Ireland

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    Bois d'Ombrie by Eau d'Italie

    Wow! Just incredible! True story: this was one of the first niche fragrances I ever tested. I fell in love with it, but I just wasn't sure enough of my own taste to take a chance on it. So I left it in the shop and took Borneo home with me instead. Two years later, and I ordered a sample of it to see if my tastes have changed. Well, clearly, since I bought Borneo and liked this one, my tastes run to the more masculine accords. Booze, cigars, tobacco, incense, musk, heavy patchouli - those notes just do it for me. And this is really good stuff.

    This one is a bit of a wild ride, though. It's quite unhinged and unbalanced. If you put too much on, it does smell like vinegar (as reported by other reviewers). The trick is to apply it in dabs, transferring it from the sprayer to your fingertips to your skin, if need be.

    The opening is boozy to the nth degree - and can be head-spinning if you sniff too deeply. It is a glass of Scottish whiskey, complete with the deepest and most realistic peat smoke note I have ever encountered. All I get is this smokey whiskey for the first hour, and it is fabulous. Although not as sugared as the rum note in Idole EDP or as sparkling as the champagne and vodka notes in Ambre Russe, there is something connecting all three - perhaps that leathery quality underpinning the booze, or the dark woods.

    The scent moves past the booze and arrives at the main point, which is a wonderful leather-vetiver-tobacco accord that is rich and very satisfying. At this stage, it is all very mens' club and Paisley slippers, which I enjoy very much. It's about this time, when the booze has burned off, that I begin to notice the very rooty (and carroty!) iris pushing through. It has an almost cheap, vegetal quality that seems at odds with the pipe-and-slippers mens' club balance of notes in the first half, but what I think the iris does is to float a balloon up through the heaviness of the main accord, flooding it with light and air. The scent burns out on this weird note, this odd combination of rooty iris and dark leather/tobacco, and reminds me quite intensely of Heeley's Iris de Nuit (or perhaps even Heeley's Cuir Pleine Fleur).

    I find the progression of this scent from smokey whiskey to leather and dry tobacco leaves and finally to a cool, carroty iris to be endlessly fascinating. It's a wild ride, alright, and most definitely not for everyone. It is kind of weird, and one or two of the notes smell a bit chemical (the pungent smoke at the start, the cheap little iris at the end), but I surprise myself by enjoying it all the same. I think that I walked away with the right scent two years ago, and would probably make the same decision today. But Bois d'Ombrie is wonderfully original and an exciting scent to wear.

    12 August, 2014

    rbaker's avatar



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    Kumquat Alhambra / Kumquat by Comptoir Sud Pacifique

    Bergamot and mandarin are the two main components I get in the opening, with the kumquat only faint in the background; in the base a whiff white musk is added. A very simple citrus-based affair. Performance is very good though, with decent silage and projection and over six hours of longevity. Nice in summer, albeit a tad unexciting.

    12 August, 2014

    Diamondflame's avatar

    Singapore Singapore

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    Givenchy III by Givenchy

    *** This review is of the original vintage ***

    Greener than the earlier reviewed Jolie Madame, Givenchy III opens with bergamot and galbanum. The central floral accord gets more noticeable with time but its sweet floralcy and intensity is held firmly in check by the deeply earthy-mossy base. The balance is immaculate, the structure holding its form remarkably well. I must agree with earlier suggestions that this is one helluva chypre that could be easily worn by either gender.

    12 August, 2014

    Diamondflame's avatar

    Singapore Singapore

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    By Man by Dolce & Gabbana

    A soapy lavender and herbaceous peppery start gives way to slightly leathery woods and ambery resins, with a slight gourmand touch that seems reminiscent of Penhaligon's Endymion. On skin By Man transitions swiftly across the phases and smells wonderfully aromatic but it is short-lived. Unfortunately, so was its run.

    12 August, 2014

    Diamondflame's avatar

    Singapore Singapore

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    Jolie Madame by Pierre Balmain

    **** This review is of the vintage. ****

    I am charmed if not smitten by this rather easy-going floral chypre from the '50s. Unlike Patou 1000, the florals are present without overwhelming, the civet modestly applied, blending in beautifully with the chypre's lightly mossy base. Like sun rays filtering through the foliage, there is a radiance that glows from within. Oh, to smell this on a woman!

    12 August, 2014

    Diamondflame's avatar

    Singapore Singapore

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    Montecristo by Masque

    Montecristo's opening is not something I particularly care for - it's like stumbling upon an old codger's smoking hideout in the attic, the air dusty and musty, with a warm tinge of sweetness redolent of stale cigar smoke and dry tobacco leaves. To my mind it has this raw yet cozy if somewhat unpolished quality that steers it away from 'sophisticated gentleman' right into 'grandpa' territory. Evocative composition it may be but not necessarily something I would want to wear.

    12 August, 2014

    Klaaon's avatar

    Singapore Singapore

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    Millésime Impérial by Creed

    The sweet salty floral acquatic notes in MI always remind me of a quiet moment by the seaside, with a breeze gently carassing... A moment of quiet solitude and peace.


    The quality here is unmistakable. And it's enjoyable when one gets to the classic Creed Milesimeb ambergris drydown.

    12 August, 2014

    tempest moon's avatar

    United Kingdom United Kingdom

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    Fleurs de Sel by Miller Harris

    Well, this is another triumph for Lynn Harris... A scent which evokes the outdoors (specifically a little town in Brittany called "Batz sur Mer" where Lynn Harris used to spend her childhood holidays). The name "Fleurs du Sel" relates to the process of collecting the top grains of salt from the salt making process. So the idea is to evoke a setting where people are sitting by the sea, in the midst of nature, making salt.

    What I get from this is a great mix between salt, earth and dry herbs. It's a very dry, aromatic fragrance. Herbs like sage, rosemary, thyme all dry and sprinkled with salt. There is also a floral backup to "soften" the whole composition. Even though this has salt and herbs, for some reason I find it very refreshing. It's incredibly well blended and softened by notes such as rose, iris and vetiver. It's not as harsh as you would think, and it has a great drydown of vetiver and sweet leather. A really great fragrance. It's not all about the salt (and to be honest I've tried much drier/saltier fragrances than this and this is quite soft and subtle in comparison).

    11th August, 2014

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